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January 11, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-11

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
TODA

Abp
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 73.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY ,1919.

PRICE THREE

WORD IS AWAITED
FROM WILSON TO,
END SHIP STRK

MASQUES PRODUCE
SUCCESSFUL PLAYl

RETURN
MAY

OF OVERSEtS
BE 1)ISCOIURA"ED
WARNING

ARMY
IS

FAMINE THREATENED
IN NEW Y0RK CITY
Ship Owners Cannot 7Iake Peace and
50,000 Men Are idle During
AdjustT Cent
(By Associated Press)
Washington, J3a. 10.-Further gov-
e nment action .o end the strike of
marine workers which has tied up
shipping in Nei' York harbor await-
ed word tonight from President Wil-
son in Paris.
Urgent reports on the situation,
suggesting that the President act to
prevent possible famine in the city
and disorganfzation of export move-
ment to the army overseas, were sent
to him by the department of labor
and executive officers of the White
House, after government representa-
tives in New York had failed to com-
pose the differences between the boat
owners , their employes. It was
said that Pr,)sident Wilson's person-
al influence \with the. workers was
counted on to induce a resumption of
work pending a settlement of the
questions on issue.
Blame for tfie present crisis ws
placed on the beat owners by the war
labor board in .a telegram to Gov-
ernor Edges replying to his request
that the. board make another effort to
adjust matters. 'Basil Stanley, joint
'chairman of the ' oard, asserted that
the marine oficers agreed to arbitrate
but that the boat owners consistently
refused and had abrogated , their
agreement thus plACing themselves in
"an untenable position."
The strike vote was taken after
the war labor board announced its
inability to effect a settlement with
the boat owners' association and plac-
ed all blame on the shoulders of the
employers.
51,000 Men ta# Be Idle
The Strike was called because pri-
vate boat owners refused to submit
the question of an eight-hour day to
arbitration by the war labor board.
In announcing the action taken,
Thomas L. Delahanty, president of
the marine' workers' affiliation, de-
clared "the strike will tie up every
ferry boat, steam lighter, towboat,
barge, deck scow and steam holster
in the. harbor," and "will automati-
cally throw out of work 42,000 long-
shoremen and 9,000 freight handlers."
He d!Cf-lared that only boats owned
by the federal government which
carry the sick and wounded from
transports to the base hospitals, and
boats plying between Manhattan
wharves and islands on which there
are hospitals would be exempted from
the strike order.
Delegates Come
For YConference
Nearly 50 delegates will attend a
state Y.'M. C. A. conference at Lane
hall Saturday and Sunday to discuss
the plan of training students for lead-
ership in the rebuilt world. The per-
sonnel will consist of Y. M. C. A. and
faculty representatives, religious work
leaders and students from the col-
leges of the state of Michigan. The
xaeetings which will be called to or-
der at 8 o'clock Saturday . morning
will a4journ 5 o'clock Sunday.
The '1irs of the discussion
groups will e Dr. C. D. Boyd, act-
ing state stude t secretary, Profes-
sor Greene, hea of the -department
of physics at Albion llege, Mr. D.
C. Hefley, religious wor-secretary of
the city Y. M. C. A.. an, -Mr. J. K

Ludwick, assistant instri 'ter and
sdident in the medical cl Ce of the
University.
A demonstration of dEeusional
Bible study by Mr. Lud Bk wil be
included in the talks. T ',is method
of Bible study has been aceefully
used in many of the large kcamps and

"The Kleptomaniac," a one act com-
edy, given by Masques at the Women's
league party yesterday afternoon was
enthusiastically received by a large
audience. The plot which was based
on the loss of a valuable purse was
interesting and the portrayal of the
characters 'involved was good. Gert-
rude Grow, '20, the tearful loser of
the purse, played the leading role suc-
cessfully.
After the play the audience ad-
journed to the parlors of the gymna-
ium to dance where refreshments
were served.
FRENCH ORG WS GIN,
TO APPEAR T FSTIVL
JOSEPH BONNET, WELL KNOWN
PLAYER, AWARDED MANY
HIGH PRIZES
Joseph Bonnet, French organist,
who played in one of last year's May
festival matinee concerts, will again
appear in Ann Arbor, Jan. 19.
Mr. Bonnet first began the study
of the organ under his- father, who
was an organist at St. Eulalie. At
14 he was appointed organist of St.
Nicholas and then of St. Michael's
church in his native town, where he
gave his first recital. Later he went
to Paris and immediately entered %4e
Conservatoire under the tuition of
Alexander Guilmant.
Awarded. High Prizes
After some years of study the first
prize for organ playing and improvi-
sation was awarded him unanimously
after a brilliant rendering of Liszt's
Fantasia, "Le Prophete." After ob-
taining the Alexander Guilmant prize,
Bonnet entered as candidate in the
open competition for the post of or-
ganist of St. Eustache, all the com-
petitors being first prize men of the
Paris Conservatoire. Th4 judges
unanimously awarded hm e palm.
Mr. Bonnet's repertoire includes the
whole of organ literature from Fres-
cobaldi, de Grigny, Scarlatti, and
Bach, to Cesar Franck.
Greatest Since Guilmant
Mr. H. T. Finck of the New York
Evenig Post criticizes Bonnet In the
following manner:
"Joseph Bonnet is not only an ar-
tist and virtuoso, but a scholar and
profound musician of the highest at-
tanments. Since the memorable
visit of Guilmant nothing has been
heard here to compare with the work
Bonnet is doing. His being in Amer-
ica at this time is most opportune and
is exerting an influence that is far-/
reaching."
MANDOLIN CLUB TO
START NEXT TERM
Plans for a Mandolin club for next
semester are being formulated. All
men except freshmen who can play
mandolins, guitars, banjos, violins,
'cellos or any of the plucked-string in-
struments are eligible.
Frank Tabor, '17, who was formerly
director of this organization has not
yet been released from the navy and
nothing definite can be down until a
new director is found. There will be
a try-out within the next week.
Nothing will be done with. the Fresh-
man Glee and Mandolin clubs until
next semester. If a sufficient number
wish them and a director can be found
steps may b taken to re-organize
these clubs.

MICHIGAN QINTET
DEFEATS OFFICERS
Weiss and Williams Star for Wol-
verines, Overcoming Superior of
Custer Team
SOLDIERS UNABLE TO LOCATE
BASKET; BOYD ONLY STAR
Michigan defeated the Camp Cus-
ter Officers team 25 to 12 ih a slow
game at Waterman gymnasium last
night. This was the opening of the
official Wolverine season and consti-
tuted the first home game of the year.
Poor passing and poor handling of
the ball made up the majority of
Michigan's offensive play. The Offi-
cers proved themselves far superior
to the Wolverines in the passing
game and only the good work of Wil-
liams and Weiss and the superior de-
fensive style of play used by Michi-
gan saved the victory from being a
defeat.
Start Game Well
The first half ending with the score
11 to 7 in favor of Coach Mitchell's
men. The Maize and 'Blue started the
game in good shape, scoring several
baskets before the Custer team found
themselves. Karpus opened the scor-
ing by tossing a free throw through
the hoop and followed it a few min-
utes later with a basket from the
field. Loring was fortunate in his
heaves towards the ring in this pe-
riod and succeeded in caging three
double counters. Towards the end
of the half, the soldiers began to lo-
cate the basket and slowly but surely
cut down the Wolverines' lead.
Work Better Last Half
After being subjected to a hard
talk from Coach Mitchell the team
returned to the game in the second
half and working a slight bit better.
Throughout the whole of the game
the individual players having the ball
could find no one to whom to throw
it. The team seemed to be suffersi
with' an attack of rheumatism and
did but little moving around. Weiss
in the final period managed to find
the basket twice, Williams three
times and Karpus once and these
added to four free throws made by
Reiss brought the total up to 25.
Boyd Stars for Soldiers
Partly because Michigan succeeded
in hanging on to the ball more than
the visitors and largely because of'
the good work of Williams on the de-
fense the Officers' score was held to
12. Neither could the soldiers lo-
(Continued on Page Six)
KIECKHEFER RETAINS THREE
CUSHION BILLIARD TITLE
Augie Kieckhefer, the Chicago
world's champion three cushion bil-
liard player, retained the title by de-
feating Pierre Maupome 150 to 141.
The breaks of the last block went to
Kieckhefer ,and as they came at the
beginning of the evening's play they
undoubtedly had a large psychologi-
cal effect on the challenger. The
score of the final block was 550 to
455. The high run was 5, Augie get-
ting one run of that number and Mau-
pome getting two.
E. Leahndorff, '16, Dies at Home
Word has been received at the Acacia
fraternity house of the death of Elmer
Leahndorff, '16, of Rogers City, Mich.
Mr. Leahndorff was a member of the
Acacia and Symphonia fraternities
and of the local Masonic orders. He
died from pneumonia while at his

home in Rogers City.
Ask $5,000 Pension for Mrs. Roosevelt
Washington, Jan. 10.-A pension of
$5,000, to be paid by the goVernment
to Mrs. Edith Carrow Roosevelt, wid-
ow of Colonel Roosevelt was propos-
ed in a bill introduced yesterday by
Representative Gallivan, of Massachu-
setts.

REGENTS INSTALL
NEW DEPARTMENT

Faculty Men
New

to Be Welcomed Back;
Retirement Plan
Approved

PROFESSOR ZOWSKI ON LEAVE
TO ATTEND PEACE CONFERENCE
A chair in public health nursing has
been authorized by the Board of Re-
gents at their meeting yesterday. Miss
Dora Barnes, of New York and Colum-
bia university, was appointed profess-
or of the department which will open
Feb. 17, the beginning of the second
semester.
Members of the University faculty
who have been serving their coun-
try in the various branches of the ser-
vice were extended a welcome to come
back and notified that their old poi-
tions are open for them.
Among those who have been in war
work and who were welcomed back
were Col. V. C. Vaughan, Col. A. L.
Lovell, Major Moses Gomberg, Major
Jesse Reeves, Major Walter Fishleigh,
Major Udo Wile, Major Peter Field,
Capt. D. L. Webster, Capt. U. B. Phil-
lips, Capt. A. H. Decker, and Lieut.
Charles Meyers.
Board Approves New Plan
The Regents placed their stamp of
approval upon the plan that was re-
cently suggested by Mr. Henry Pritch-
ett, president of the Carnegie Founda-
tion, to succeed the old system of a
retirement fund for teachers of the
associated colleges. According to the
president of the Carnegie Foundation
it would be impossible for that or-
ganization to continue the present sys-
tem for many more years without ser-
ious financial embarrassment, and so
a new plan is to be instituted in which
the Foundation, the .faculty member
who is to be aided, and the University
bear the burden of the expense. The
plan provides for -insurance "at cost
and a stipulated allowance upon re-
tiring, the amount to be tlecidd 'upon
between the teaher and the Founda-
tion.
The Carnegie Foundation will con-
tinue its present liberal system for
those who were teachers in the as-
sociated colleges on Nov. 17, 1915. The
new plan is to provide for those who
have become teachers since that date.
Professor Zowski Honored
An extension to the leave of ab-
sence of Prof. S. J. Zowski, of the
engineering faculty, was granted in
order" that' he may attend the peace
conference in Paris to which he has
been invited to act in an advisory ca-
pacity. Professor Zowski had intend-
ed to return to the university upon
the completion of the work which he
has been doing on the United States
board of inquiry, but he was strongly
urged to perform this mission and ac-
cepted.
The will of Miss Ruth Gentry, '90,
of Indianapolis, was read before the
Regents. She left $4,000 to the Uni-
versity for the establishment of a
scholarship or loan fund for women.'
Chinese to Meet Here
Permission was granted to the Mid-
Western Chinese Students' alliance
to use the University buildings for
the eight-day convention which they
are to hold in Ann Arbor, August,
1919.
The resignation of Prof. H. A. Glea-
son, director of the University bo-
tanical gardens, was accepted. He
will leave tq take up a similar posi-
tion at the New York botanical gar-
dens.l
A leave of absence was granted to
George H. Pomeroy, assistant pro-
fessor in electrical engineerinng.
Harold Collins, '18E, was appointed to
take his place. Another leave of ab-
sence was granted to Prof. H. E.
Riggs, of the engineering department,
during the second semester in order
that he may serve on the board of ar-
bitration that is to make an appraisal
of the property and stocks of the Cur-
tiss Airplane mpany of Buffalo.

UNION REFUNDS $3
TO LIFE MEMBERS
Union life members who are paying
for their memberships in yearly in-
stallments will be required to pay the
regular $10 installment this year, but
the $3.00 added to University entrance
fees will be refunded when the money
is turned over to. the Union by the
University.
The customary bills for the install-
ment have been sent out and by this
time have been. received by the ipen.
EATiNG PLACES.GiEN
INSPECTION BY DOCTORS'
FOUR UNSATISFACTORY; SEVEN
EXCELLENT, PRECAUTIONS
URGED
Of 34 restaurants, boarding houses,'
and soda fountains in the city exam-
ined by the University health service'
to ascertain sanitation conditions,
four were pronounced unsatisfactory'
and only seven were pronounced ex-l
cellent.
The report was based upon whether
dishes were thoroughly cleansed,1
napkins re-used, the hands of those
handling food washed frequently, an
whether employes having colds were
allowed to work.
Urge Greater Precautions ?
Health service authorities urge that
greater consideration be given this'
matter by all concerned and an-
nounce that a continued effort will be{
made to raise the standard of clean-3
liness of all places serving food or
drink They say that if persons using
these places would take moro pre-
cautions, the sick list would be con-
iderably diminished.
Gives Health Rep ert
The military authorities made an
investigation during November sim-
ilar to the one just conducted by the1
health service and ord41'ed some of
the proprietors to keel their places
of business cleaner. T.e places were
cleaned up at the t r.
For the month of December the
health service reports: 795 dispensary
calls, 129 new patients, 546 new di-
agnosis, 137 room calls, 60 hospital
refers, 26 hospital bed patients, and'
1 death.
D. L. GEORGE HEADS
BRITISH CABINET
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. 10.-The new British
cabinet will be headed by David
Lloyd .George as premier and first
lord of the treasury ,according to an
official statement issued tonight. Oth-
er members of the government will be:
Lord prevy seal and leader of the
house of commons, Andrew Bonar
Law.
President of the council and lead-
er in the house of lords, Earl Chur-
zon, of Kedleston.
Ministers without portfolio, George
N. Bonds and Sir Eric Geddes; lord
chancellor, Sir F. E. Smith; home
secretary, Edward Shortt; foreign
secretary, Arthur J. Balfour; secre-
tary of the colonies, Viscount Milnar;
secretary of war and air minister,
Winston Churchill; secretary for In-
dia, Edward Montagu; first lord of
the admiralty, Walter H. Long, and
secretary of agriculture, A. E.Pro-
thero.
NUMBER OF GERMAN COURSES

TO DEPEND ON POPULARITY
German courses -offered in the cat-
alogue will continue throughout the
year, but whether or not the number
will be increased next year will de-
pend on the demand for them. ' Only
a few were suspended, and these only
because of the waning popularity of
German, not on account of any re-
strictions put on the teaching of Ger-
man by the government or University
authorities.
LIEUT. F. K. HIRTH AWARDED
FRENCH HONOR AFTER DEATH
Lieut. Frederic Karl Hirth, '14E,
aviation observer, who was killed in
France July 16, 1918, received a
Croix de Guerre from the French
government for conspicuous bravery.
The medal was received on Christ-
mas day by his parents in Toledo.
Lieut.Hirth was a member of the- Phi

BRITISH GENERAL
PLA1NS FOR LEA~
TO PREVENTWARS
CABINET MEMBER DESCRIBES
POSSIBLE OPERATION OF IN-
TERNATIONAL ALLIANCE
PAMPHLET ISSUED TO
EXPLAIN PROPOSALS
Statesman Suggests World Control by
Entente Nations to Further
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. 10.-In a pamphlet
published today entitled "A League of
Nations, a Program for the Peace Con-
ference," General John Christian
Smutts, former member of the British
war cabinet, says it is necessary to
view a league of nations not only as a
possible means to prevent future wars,
but as a great organ for the orderly
and peaceful 1 fe of civilization and as
the foundation of a new international
system.
War Makes Fundamental Change
The war, he declared, has wrought
a fundamental change in the political
map of Europe. The Russian, Austri-
an, and Turkish empires already have
disappeared, while Germany "even it
she survives the storm of the coming
days will lose her subject races of
non-German blood."
"The only statesman-like course,"'
Geiberal Smutts continues, "is to make
the league of nations revisionary, iin
the broader sense, of the three em-
pires, Russia, Austria and Turkey,
whose people now are deficient in
self-government. The peace confer-
ence, therefore, should look upon the
formation of a league of nations as its
primary task and should look upon it-
self as the first meeting of the league,
Believes in No Annxations
"Regarding the setteient of affairs
in Russia, Austria, and Turkey, there
should be no annexations of any of
these territories and in the future the
principle of government with the con-
sent of the governed should be follow-
ed. Finland, Poland, Czecho-Slovakia
and Jugo-Slovia will probably be cap-
able of statehood and should be rec-
ognized as independent states from the
beginning."
Smutts Against Conscription
Regarding future prevention of war,
after expressing himself strongly
makes the following definite proposal:
"The peace treaty shall provide that
members of the league bind themselv-
es not to go to war with one another
-first, without previously submitting
the matter in dispute to the council
of the league; second, until there has
been an award by the council, and
third, not even then against a member
which complies with the award or rec-
ommendation made by the council."
Trance to Obtain
New Boarder Lines
(By Havas Agency)
Paris, Jan. 10.-President Wilson
before he returns to the United
States will reach an agreement with
Entente representatives as to certain
fundamentals, according to Gaulois.
These questions concern a new
boundary between France and Ger-
many, indemnities and reparations,

Balkan and near East matters.
The President has accepted an in-
vitation to attend a luncheon to be
given by the French senate between
Jan. 15 and Jan. 20. President Poin-
care, the foreign ambassadors here,
senators and members of the govern-
ment, will be among the guests.
Rear Admiral Grayson, the Presi-
dent's physician, is said to have or-
dered him to take a complete rest of
38 hours after his return from Italy.
The Matin says that the President
desires to visit the devastated re-
gions of France before the opening of
the peace conference and will make
the journey Saturday.
Washfenaw County Improves Roads
The county of Washtenaw spent
71,606.60 in the improvement and the
building of good roads during the year
of 1918. The county road commis-
sioners are planning an extensive
god roads program for the coming

LIEUT. L. E. BATTLES, '17L,
WOUNDED. RETURNS TO

US

Among those who recently return-
ed to the United States on the Bat-
tleship North Carolina, was Lieut.
Lloyd E. Battles, '17L, a member of
the Phi Alpha Delta fraternity. He
was twice wounded in service, once
by a piece of shrapnel which struck
P1 nin the right shoulder, and again
by a machine-gun bullet in the right
thigh. Lieut. Battles participated in
some of the hardest fighting of the
war. His home is in Baraboo, Wis.
Only 450 Women Register to Vote
Detroit, Jan. 10.-Only 450 women
have thus far registered for the spring
election, says City Clerk Lindsay. Al-
though there are '50,000 women who
might vote it is expected that no more
than 500 will have registered by Feb.

I f

SOCIAL

TONITE

- 7:30

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION

EVERYBODY WELCOME

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