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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHI
COOL AND CLOUD
TODAY

ER
-Y

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mmplp a tA61Fllj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SEBVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 70.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1919.

PRICE THREE

So A. IT C. OFFICE
APIDLYWNING
up ITS BUSINESS
TI
ThE ELEVEN MEN LEFT EXPECT
TO BE 1JSTERED OUT OF
SERVICE SOON
MAIL DECEMBER PAY;
LIBERTY BOND REFUNDS
Some Papers Delayed by the Failure
of Men to Turn in Their
Discharges
The S. A. T. C. unit in Ann Arbor
now consists of only seven officers
and four sergeants. Major Ralph H.
Durkee is still in command. The
other officers who are still stationed
here are: First Lieuts. Edward D.
Bolton, Guy N. Crawford and G. I.
Back; Second Lieuts. Norman J.
Merrill, Leo R. Walter, E. J. Stotter
and Walter E. Squire. Major Durkee
stated yesterday that probably all the
men who are here will be discharged
by next Saturday, as the work of
closing the post is now nearly at an
end. Major Durkee will stay to the
last, as it is necessary for him to
sign all the papers for the discharge
and payment of the others. He will
probably be discharged himself and
leave within 10 days.
Lieutenant Stotter has moved his
office from the old quartermasters'
building on State and Huron to the
new Union. Although most of the
equipment has been sent away there
are still some records to be made up.
Still Must Turn in Uniforms
Every day Major Durkee is in re-
ceipt of several inquiries from men
who were discharged from the S. A.
T. C. in regard to the keeping and
wearing of their uniforms. Although
it has been stated in some newspa-
pers that the men are to be allowed
to keep their uniforms, no such orders
have been received here; and the old
orders are still in force, namely, that
the discharged men may wear thei
uniforms for a period of four months,
at the end of which time they must be
turned in to the quartermaster at1
Chicago.
The temporary mess hall that was
at the south end of the new Union
is now entirely torn down. The few
men remaining here have their meals
in the new Union. .
Mall Discarges and Pay
The work of mailing to all Section
A men their discharges and pay for the1
month of December is being complet-
ed. While many of the men are wait-1
ing in Ann Arbor for the papers ar.d
money, the desired articles are beng
sent by registered mail to the men's
homes, to be relayed back to Ann
Arbor., Excepted from the number to
be paid thus far are about 50 men
who failed to turn in their discharg-
es when told to do so. They Will not{
be paid until they obey the instruc-
tions issued last month.
Pay Insurance to Washington
Most of the money was sent out last1
week as soon as it had arrived from
the Chicago headquarters, and men;
whose service records bear Ann Ar-I
bor addresses have already received;

their pay. Men who had subscribed}
and partly paid for Liberty bonds'
which they surrendered later, are re-
funded the money which was deduct-
ed from their pay in October and Nov-
ember. The entire amount of money
disbursed was in excess of $50,000,
Major Durkee stated yesterday. Pay-
ment for government insurance was
not deducted from the final pay; thist
must be paid by the men within 60
days to a Washington office.1
Company 13 Accounts Confused
The. only delay in the proceedings
is the slighting of the thirteenth
company, whose accounts were con-
fused in the Chicago offices through
no fault of the local authorities. The
men of the company may be paid
somewhat later than the others. A few
men of Section B will be paid as soon
as they can be 1 cated. Men who
know the whereabouts of any men who
have not handed in their discharges
are requested to report the fact to the

140

LIT STUDENTS
RE-ENTER SCHOOL

One hundred and forty students have
re-enrolled in the literary college dur-
ing the last two days. Of this num-
ber the majority are naval unit men
who were released the day before the
Christmas vacation. Five former stu-
dents, three new transfers from other
college's, and two new freshmen regis-
tered yesterdaY for the first time this
academic year.
Of the nunger of literary students
formerly enrolled in the S. A. T. C.,
more than 50 per cent have remained
in the University. It is expected that
a larger percentage of the naval unit
men will continue their studies here.
Dean John R. Effinger has received a
considerable number of letters from
students stating that they will return
at the opening of the second semester.
The letters were received from men
who are still in the camps and others
who have been recently discharged.
Fees for the naval unit men in this
college who were released during the
week of Dec. 16, are as follows: Forty-
six dollars and fifty cents for old non-
resident students and $32.75 for old
Michigan residents.
NO DEFINITE DTE SET
FOR PEACE CONGRESS
CENTRAL POWERS TO GAIN AN
ENTRANCE TO MEETING AS
PROBATIONERS
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 7.-There is yet no in-
dication when the general peace con-
ference will begin its session nor is it
clear what progress can be made be-
fore President Wilsoie returns to the
United States in the middle of Feb-
ruary.
The President is said to be hopeful
after his conferences in England and
Italy that enough progress has been
made on the general fundamental
agreement for a league of nations to
warrant his feeling that a definite
ground work has ben laid on which
the congress can proceed to build.
As far as it has been developed a
general scheme for aleague of nations
agrees with previous forecasts. It is
learned that the United States, Great
Britian, France, Italy and Japan will
form a nucleus and will declare that
the league will preserve the peace of
the world and justice to all., An arbi-
tral court will be created and it will
be backed by the combined force of
all.
The central powers and neutral na-
tions, it is added, will jbe taken in as
probationers as they demonstrate that
they are safe governing people anda
give evidence of good faith to abide
by the decisions of the league.
URGED AMERICANISM
IN LAST MESSAGE
(By Associated Press)
New York, Jan. 7.-In his last mes-
sage to the American people, Colonel
Roosevelt spoke for a continued and
determined fight for Americanism.
His address was read Sunday night
in the Hippodrome. Roosevelt said:
"There must be no sagging back In
the fight for Americanism just be-
cause the war is over. Any man who
says he is an American , but is some-
thitg else also, isn't an American at
all. We have room for but one flag,
the American flag, and this excludes
the red flag, We have room for but
one soul loyalty, and that is loyalty
to the American people."

Idaho Senate Indorses Dry Measure
Boise, Ia.. Jan. 7,--Ratification by a1
unanimous vote here this morning of
the national prohibition amendment1
was passed by the lower house of the
Idaho legislature sworn in yesterdayI
morning.
All organizations and fratern-
ities who have contracted for
spaCe in thu 1919 Michiganensian l
must pay for the same at once '
if they wish the copy to run.
Subscriptions will be received
at Room 1, Press 1'W'ding up to
the time the book goes to press,
when the price will be raised to
$3.00.1

PRESIDENT WILSON
HONORS ROOSEVELT
Asks Marshall to Attend Funeral in
His Place; Flags at Half
Mast
FACULTY MEN PAY TRIBUTE
TO LOST LEADER'S INFLUENCE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 7. - Vice-presi-
dent Marshall, acting as the personal
representative of President Wilson,
committees of the senate and house of
representatives of the state, war, and
navy departments left Washington to-
night for Oyster Bay to attend the fu-
neral tomorrow of Theodore Roose-
velt.
President Wilson, at Paris, sent a
personal cablegram to Mr. Marshall
today asking that he attend the fu-
neral today as the President's repre-
sentative. Late today the President
sent an official proclamation to the
American people, in which he paid
high tribute to Mr. Roosevelt and di-
rected that flags on all government
buildings be displayed at half staff for
30 days and that suitable military and
naval honors be rendered.
Many Ann Arbor people knew Col-
onel Roosevelt personally as he has
been here on several occasions. The
first visit was after he graduated from
Harvard, when he attended a meet-
ing of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity.
He gave a public address in Univer-
sity hall during his office as govern-
or of New York, and later attended a
luncheon and reception for the facul-
ty in Barbour gymnasium. His last
public appearance here was shortly
after he left the presidency when he
was passing through Ann Arbor on
the train. He stopped long enough to
address several thousand students on
the platform.
President Harry B. Hutchins said
yesterday:
"In the death of Colonel Roosevelt
the nation loses its most distinguished
citizen. His influence upon American
institutions has been great and will
be lastng. He made mistakes -- who
does not - but he was open-minded
and willing to acknowledge them.
Even those opposed to him politicallyj
recognize his real greatness and hiss
genuine Americanism. He will be
sadly missed. Although dead, he will
live in his work."
Dean Bates Calls Him Statesman
Dean Henry M. Bates said, "In Mr.
Roosevelt's death the country has lost
a man of great courage, originality
and ability. In the improvement of
our civil service, in the reorganiza- i
tion of the navy and the partial reor-
ganization of the army, in developing
the policy of the conservation of our
national public resources, and in vig-
orous and successful curbing of cor-
porate and trust control, Mr. Roose-
(Continued on Page Six)

RUSH COM ,PLETION
Of UNONBUILING
Meeting of Prominent Alumni Decides
To Complete Student Clubhouse
Quickly
CONFIDENT NEEDED FUNDS CAN
BE RAISED AMONG SUPPORTERS
The new Union building will be
finished by next fall. This was unan-
imously decided upon at a meeting of
36 Michigan alumni on December 28.
These men, whose classes range
from '63 up to.'08, came from various
parts of the country to attend the
meeting. Among them were: David
B. Heinemaji former Detroit food
administrator; Levi L. Barbour, who
instituted Barbour gymnasium; Col.
William B. Starrett, who let the con-
tracts for the first 16 national army
camps; Homer L. Heathe, secretary
of the Union; Capt. Charles A. Rie-
gelman of New York.
Show Importance of Union
After a tour of the building at 10
o'clock that morning Pres. Harry B.
Hutchins called the meeting to order
in the lounging room of the new
building. Remarks were made by a
numbr of the men concerning the
importance of the building to the
faculty, students,hand alumni of the
University, the history of its construc-
tion, the loan of $260,000 that the
Union received from the Michigan
State Board. This fitted the building
for the service that it rendered in
feeding 4,200 men, the largest body
of uniformed students in any univer-
sity or college in the United States.
The topic most earnestly discussed
was the need of more funds to com-
plete and furnish the building for the
needs of this year and the future.
Needs $300,000 to Complete
President Hutchins appointed Dav-
id E. Heineman, Harry C. Bulkley,
and Hiram S. Cody to audit the books
of the building committee. The lat-
ter committee stated that the present
cost of maintenance is $9,775 per
year, that is if neither the building
nor equipment is improvedupon. For
$162,080 the.building can be partially
completed and for $252,775 everything
can be completed except for the
swimming pool and bowling alleys.
Every man that was present at the
meeting believes that it is possible to
raise $301170, which will insure the
completon of the entire building.
Appoint Campaign Committee
The alumni decided that the friends
and alumni of the University may be
relied upon to furnish the necessary
funds. Dean Henry M. Bates is chair-
man of the campaign committee which
will be in charge of raising the addi-
tional money.
After luncheon there was further
discussion and the meeting adjourned
at 3:30 after an enthusiastic speech
by Lawrence Maxwell, '74. 1

BERLIN
FOR

PREPARES
SPARTACANS

(By Associated Press)
Berlin Jan. 6 (delayed).-A govern-
ment official has informed the corre-
spondent that the cabinet has rallied
all agencies to the support of law and
order and defense of the government.
"If the Spartacans attack us," said
the official, "they will find us pre-
pared. We have all the troops needed
to assert our authority. Naturally we
are anxious to avoid a conflict, but if
it comes it will not be of our choos-
ing."
The correspondent has been inform-
ed in competent quarters that the gov-
ernment is hurriedly mobilizing all de-
fensive forces. The Spartacans also
are arming and making the royal sta-
bles their headquarters. A spacious
apartment in the former chancellor's
palace has been equipped as a Re
Cross headquarters.
LAST OF NAVAL UNIT
LEAVES HERE SATRDA
ADMIRAL BERRY RETIRES TO PRI-
VATE LIFE; LIEUT. BOAK TO
TEACH
The naval unit of the University of
Michigan is no more. The unit ceased
to exist last Saturday when Rear-
Admiral Robert A. Berry, having com-
pleted his duties here, officially clos-
ed. the headquarters in the Sigma Chi
house and left the city.
All the men were either discharged
or given a furlough. The release pap-
ers were here for all the men in the
unit with the exception of six. These
men were given a furlough and their
release papers were sent to them at
their homes.
The officers who were in command
of the unit either Pave been discharg-
ed or have received orders to report
atGreat Lakes. Admiral Berry has
returned to his home in Birmingham,
Mich. After closing up all business
of the unit he left, having obtained his'
discharge from Washington.
Lieut. A. E. Boak, second in com-
mand, has resumed his duties as a
teacher in theUniversity. He is
assistant professor in the history de-
partment where he was instructing
before he joined the service.
All chief petty officers and company
commanders who were not regular
members of the University have re-
ceived orders to report for active duty
at Great Lakes, Ill. There they will
probably be put into the regular navy.
Lieut. Allen L. Porter, medical of-
ficer here, has also been ordered to re-
port at Great Lakes where he will take.
up work as a medical officer in the
regular navy.
Huns Sent Armas
To Blandit Villa
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 7. - Documentary
evidence intended to show that $280,-
000,000 worth of munitions shipped in
1915 to agents of Francisco Villa, the
Mexican bandit leader were paid for
by F. A. Sommerfeld now interned as
an enemy alien, was presented today
to the senate committee investigat-
ing German propaganda by Major L.
Humes, who is conducting the in-
quiry.
The munitions were brought from
the Western Cartridge Company at
Alton, Ill., according to the evidence,
and were paid for through the Missis-
sippi Valley Trust Company from
funds transferred from the Guarantee
Trust Company of New York City. The
first shipments were sent -to Louis

Goxiola, of El Paso Tex. who it was
alleged dealt 'with the bandit's broth-
er Hippilito Villa but later the ship-
ments were consigned direct to the
latter according to the evidence. Ma-
jor Humes told the committee he had
been unable to trace the source of the
funds which the Guarantee Trust
Company sent to the bank.
Theta Delta Chi Changes Residence
The Theta Delta Chi fraternity has
moved into its new temporary quart-
ers, the old Westminister house at 602
East Huron street. The Theta Delta
Chi house at 910 Cornwell Place has
been sold to the St. Joseph's hospital
for use--as a nurses' home. It is ex-
pected that the men, will occupy their
new home for the rest of the year.

YANKEE DEATH
AT ARCHANGEL
132,5SAS CABLE
CABLEGRAM STATES MORALE OF
THE TROOPS RANKS
HIGH
AMERICANS LACK FRESH
SUPPLY OF VEGETABLES
Soldiers Possess Sufficient Equipment
To Stand Rigors of Cold
Winter
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 7.-Total deaths
among the American expeditionary
forces in northern Russia to Jan. 4
were given as six officers and 126 men
in a cablegram received at the war
department today from Col. James A.
Ruggles, American military attache
with American forces at Archangel.
Colonel Ruggles said the equipment
of the troops was complete, the health
excellent and the morale very good,
Food conditions were described as
very good, the greatest defect being
lack of fresh vegetables.
Ruggles Answers U. S. Queries
Colonel's Ruggles' cablegram was
in reply to specific questions sent by
the war department as the result of
statements that troops in northern
Russia were inadequately equipped
for the rigors of the Russian winter.
"General health of American troops
in north Russia excellent," said the
message. "Living conditions best
available, in some cases primitive.
Would rate them from fair to very
good on the several fronts.
Food Conditions Good
"Food cbnditions are very good,
greatest defect owing to lack of frea
vegetables and limited supplies of
dried vegetables.
"Sufficient clothing supply and oth-
er supplies ample and excellent.
"General morale is unusually good."
NATION TO K E E P
RAILROAD CONTROL
T Washington, Jan. 7.-Extension of
government control and operation of
railroads from Jan. 1, 1924, as recom-
mended by Director General McAdoo
was proposed in an amendment to the
rail control act introduced by Chair-
man Sims of the house Inter-state
committee. An additional revolving
fund of $500,000,000,000 was proposed
by another amendment offered by
Representative Sims.
Railroad executives have decided to
recommend to congress a system of
unified private management of rail
lines with strong public control ex-
ercised by a secretary of transporta-
tion in the President's cabinet, and a
reorganized inter-state commerce com-
mission with regional divisions acting
as a court of last resort in rate dis-
putes.
This became known here today coin-
cidental with the disclosure of the in-
ter-state commerce commission's at-
titude that railroads should be return-
ed to private management "within a
reasonable period" to allow for prepa-
rations and re-adjustment, and under
"broadened, extended, and amplified
governmental regulaions."

ONLY ENGINEERS AND LITS
HAVE MADE J-HOP PLANS
Karl Velde, '20, chairman of the J-
Hop committee, stated yesterday that
no further plans for the hop had been
made. This is caused by the fact that
only the Engineers and Lits have ap-
pointed their committeemen. The oth-
er schools should do this as soon as
possible because no definite arrange-
rrients can be made until they do so,
he says.
MEN STUDENTS! NOTICEI
Every male student in the Un-
iversity who has not yet re-en-
rolled, is asked to do so immed-
iately. S. A. T. C. men are re-
quired to show their discharge
papers, the naval unit men their
releases.

FRESHMEN!

With the passing of the S. A. T. C.
from' Michigan, the freshmen once
more enter into their proper sphere.
While some of them may continue to
wear their uniforms, they are no long-'
er protected by virtue of membership
in the United States army.
Henceforth the class of 1922 will be
expected to live up to the traditions of
Michigan, and to make unnecessary
the stringent measures which upper-
classmen and sophomores areprepar-
ed to take 'in case of their failure to
do so. In order that the freshmen may
acquaint themselves with these tradi-
tions, The Daily publishes again the
following freshman rules and regula-
tions:
1. Wear your freshman cap or
toque at all times, except Sunday.
Your class identity cannot be con-
cealed by your not wearing your cap
or toque; nor is there any reason why
it should be hidden, for every Mich-
igan man was a freshman once. Up-
perclassmbn respect the freshman who
wears his class hat.
2. Discard all preparatory and high
school insignia. This includes high
school fraternity pins and football
sweaters.
3. Do not smoke a pipe on the cam-
pus. There will be plenty of numeral1
pipes when you are a junior; that is7
when they are to be used.

4. Do not sit on senior engineer
benches.
5. Always allow a man of higher
class to precede you through a door
or at a crossing. Don't walk four
abreast on a narrow sidewalk.
6. Attend all class neetings and
class functions and take part in all
class contests.
7. Learn "The Yellow and Blue"-
and other Michigan songs as quick-
ly as possible.
8. Speak to every male member
of your class whether you have been
introduced or not. Michigan has the
reputation of being the most demo-
cratic university in the country, and
you can uphold this tradition by liv-
ing up to this tradition.
9. Although the participation of
freshmen in campus activities is re-
stricted, avail yourself of every oppor-
tunity to enter into the life of the
University. University life includes
something more than dances and mov-
ies.
10. Remember that you are now a
Michigan man and that your first and
last allegiance is to Michigan. Do all
in your power for the good of Mich-
igan. If you know a good man who
is about to enter a university, talk
Michigan to him. Give your best to
Michigan and your returns will be. in
proportion.

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