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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 19, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, DECEMBI

FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday
gthe university year by the Board. in
of of Student Publications.
BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
nscredited to it or not otherwise credited
s paper and also the local news pub
herein.
:red at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
gan, as second class matter.
scriptions by carrier or mail, $3.so.
aces : Ann Arbor Press Building.
nes: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
nmunications not to exceed 300 words,
ned, the signature not. necessarily to ap-
n print, but as an evidence of faith, and
!s of events will be published in The
at thediscretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to the office.
igned comi unigations will receive no
eration. No manuscript will be re-
I unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
ents expressed in the communications.
:d C. Mighell.......Manliging Editor
d Makinson..........business Manager

Congress wants Germany to reim-
burse America for the cost of the war
As German resources have been dem-
onstrated to be far from infinite,
wouldn't it be a good idea to, reim-
burse Belgium and France first?
"Outdoor track to be uspi. by track
men."-Sport headline. The opera is
not the only affair which is evidently
to be for men only.
The French are surprised that Wil-
son can smile. But who wouldn't
smile to be the lion at the world's
greatest party?
And even if it does get cold no one
in Ann Arbor needs to suffer. Every-
body can gather 'round the University
coal pile.
The unusually fair weather we've
been having is undoubtedly due to the
fact that Goodfellows are getting to-
gether.
Take your uniform home anyway.1
Somebody must clean out the chimney
before Santa comes.
It only costs a dollar to belong to
the best club in the world-the Red
Cross.
UWA flC ITflDV IIITDIIC

PROCEEDS OF SALES
FILL COMFORT BAGS
One hundred fifty comfort bags
made by members of the army of wo-
men war workers of the University.
are now being filled with articles pur-
chased from the proceeds of the pie
sales, ice cream sales, and the campus
mixer. The bags will be dispatcheci
Friday in order that they may reach
their destination before Christmas.
A letter from Capt. G. N. Lund,
commanding officer of the Brooklyn
naval hospital, expresing appreciation
for the comfort bags was received by
Florence Fields, '20, chairman of the
war work committee of the Women's
league.
Captain Lund said in part: "We
shall be most happy to receive these
bags and will distribute them among
the patients who within our own judg-
ment are entitled to them. Please ac-
cept our sincere thanks and assur-
ances of appreciation of this generous
and patriotic offer and all the lofty3
sentiment it contains.'
FARM WORK MEDALS AWARDED
16 ANN ARBOR "HIGH" BOYS
United States medals were awarded
to 16 boys of the Ann Arbor high
school who worked on farms last
summer for not less than six weeks.
Thavwr bhrc of tho United

I

'tJ0f1rncuE I

I

,, t

All comfort bags should be finished
and turned in at Barbour gymnasium
today.

When you go home
Take with you a

The fancy dress party given annual-
ly by the Women's league will be held
in January. Girls are advised to look
up their costumes during the holi-
days.
Freshmen and juniors will practice
basketball at 5 o'clock this afternoon.
Christmas tree parties were given
last night at several of the sororities.
Each sorority had a little girl for the
guest of honor.

MICHICAN

CALENDAR

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ONLY 50c

WA H- S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

FOR LIBERTY

s R. Osius, Jr............City
erite Clark..............Night
iC. J. Martin........Telegraph
a A. Bernstein .......S... port
nt H. Riorden..........Military
as Guernsey............Women's
K. shlbert............Associate
. Davis ............Literary

Edtor
Edir
Edit".
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

and A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
S L. Abele......... Publication Manager
ild M. Major.... . Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
I Landis UPaul G Weber
ce W. Porter Philip Ringer
Dailey E. D. Flinternann
RE~PORTERS
aret Christie Herman Lustfield
Ellis Bowen Schumacher
Apel . Henry O'Brien
e.Crozier . Renaud Sherwood
D. Lane Marie 'rhorpe
M. D. Vincent

BUSINESS
rk B. Covell
vard Priehs, Jr.
R. Welsh

STAFF
Robert E. McKean
Clare W. Weir
Wmn. A. Leitzinger

EIURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1918.
Issue Editor-V. H. RMordepi
GET A GRIP WHILE YOU'RE
GONE
A vacation of 17 days, one of the
ngest Christmas recesses which
chigan students have ever had, be-
ns tomorrow night. The strain of

al conditions,

disorganizedI

work, and uncertainty has made a
good long holiday vital to the welfare
of everyone In the University; faculty
and students alike need it. Young
minds and bodies recover vitality
quickly under the influence of change
and recreation such as we will all
get diting the holidays 'at home, and
New Year's should find most of us as
right as tops and eager to come back
to a Michigan which will make almost
as fresh a start Jan. 7 as it ever has
made in October.
But recuperation in the sense of
absolute respite from thought was not
the only purpose for which this vaca-
tion was intended and may very well
be used. This is not an argument for
loading up the old suit-case with text-
books which will never be "cracked"
from one end of vacation to the other.
If you are well acquainted with your-
self and are reasonably sure that you
can hold to your purpose to make up
some work at home, that is one thing;
but, if as is most probable, you know
by experience how slim the chances
are of getting anything accomplished,
don't try it.
Just promise yourself one thing and
then stick to it. Some time before
coming back to Ann Arbor, take a
couple of hours off to think. First
consider your University life as a
whole, the friends and associations you
are making, the proportions of time
that you are putting into work and
play, the attitude you find yourself
getting into toward the world in gen-
eral, the ideals you have unconscious-
ly been forming this fall. Try to
chart the main currents which are
carrying you along. Then think about
your work itself, reflect on what you
are getting out of the courses you
are taking, what possibilities each one
contains for your self-development or
the attainment of your life-purpose.
If these appear small, face the ques-
tion as to whether the fault is yours,
the instructor's, or the nature of the
subject. Look at the problem of get-
ting more out of your work detached-
ly and as one which is perfectly solu-
ble. And almost invariably it is, for
honest and optimistic thought cannot
help but bring clear conclusions and
inspirations for action.
"Getting a grip" in this way will do
more toward straightening out what-
ever tangles await you, than gallons
of midnight oil burned while you might
be enjoying the best of holiday fun.
And it means a very small expenditure
of time and will-power, for what more
interesting subject for meditation can
be conceived than self-past, present,
and future? Try it and see how dif-
ficulties melt and disappear before the
poise which comes of knowing where
you're going as well as that you're on

lY U JdI UMIU1 I iey were me IeU s
States Boys Working Reserve. Hora-
" tio Earle, of Detroit, federal director
PROFESSOR DENIES RUMOR OF of this organization for Michigan,
MURDER OF JEWS BY POLES addressed the boys Tuesday when the
awards were made.
Ann Arbor, Dec. 17, 1918. On these medals is the government
Editor, The Michigan Daily:- seal, which has never been used for
In your account of the meeting of anything but war meals previous to
Jewish students in Lane hall, pub- this occasion.
lished in the issue of Dec. 14, you
state: "Thousands of Jews were re- Toledo Police Arrest Express Driver
cently massacred by Poles in Poland, One hundred dollars of the $236.88
and their American. kin are uniting which George Gumbrecht, driver for
to prevent the repetition of such atroc- the local office of the American Ex-
ities in the future." press company, took to Toledo with
In the interest of truth and propri- him was gone when the police of that
ety (not to use a stronger expres- city placed the man under arrest.
sion) I request you to print the fol- Chief of Police O'Brien brought the
lowing statement: prisoner back here yesterday morn-
All the allegations concerning the ing. Gumbrecht was placed on trial
murder of Jews in Poland have come before the police court, but was bound
from German sources and from a over to the circuit court. He was re-
Jewish agency in Stockholm. Their leased on $1,000 bail.
truth was immediately denied by the
temporary Polish government. Even Prince of Wales to Tour England
the Polish Jews of Cracow and War- London, Dec. 18.-King George has
saw protested against the reports, but ordered one of the latest British bat
unfortunately only a few American tle cruisers refitted to accommodate
papers printed these protests. The the Prince of Wales on a tour of the
two largest leagues of Polish socie- British dominions. It is his pur-
ties in this country issued a joint pose to express by this tour his deep
protest on Nov. 23, and requested the consciousness of the services Which
American and allied governments to the dominions have rendered during
appoint an international committee the war.
including Jews to investigate the
facts.dThe New York Tribune and You will always find satisfaction by
the Chicago Daily News several days adveritsing in the Daily.-Adv.
ago printed articles from their corre
spondents in Poland denying the
charges against the Poles and stating
that the occupation of Lemberg and
the attending massacres were aided
by criminals dressed in Austrian uni-
forms. More Poles were actually kill-
ed than Jews. Soon after Lemberg
was occupied by these bands by a
surprise attack, the Polish legions There
restored order, and immediately or-
ganized a local temporary govern- is never
ment, of which a prominent Jew, Lev- any "nag"
enberg, was appointed minister of or "drag" to
justice. It would not require the
acumen of a Professor Hobbs to scent
in this matter the traces of pro-Ger-
man propaganda, which unfortunate-
ly has found easy credence among the
American Jews. As a matter of fact,
Poland has not in its entire history "te iWSterdivwig
entertained anti-Semitic feeling; and
if it exists now it has been excited
by the insolent intrigues of Russian
and German Jews who have come in- It has that "feel"
to the country in recent years. Even that makes you M
now it is extremely slight as com- w
pared with anti-semitism in western want to go on
European countries, which have writing forever.
within their borders fewer Jews than
are found in the city of Warsawo
alone. The whole matter would bem
ridiculed and unworthy of serious3
attention, if the proverb were notm
true, "calumniare audacter, semper'
aliquid haerebit."
Very truly yours,
F. W. PAWLOWSKI.
Major Leaves Cornell $5,000,000 m
Mineola N. Y., Dec. 18.-Cornell / o
university is to be "humanized" to al
the extent of $5,000,000, according to at all
the will of Major W. D. Straight, stat$ers
young financier and diplomat. Major
Straight recently died of pneumonia
while in service. He leaves his for-
tune to his wife, providing for the
carrying out of certain "mutual agree- Jew elry "
ments" pertaining to the "humaniza-
tion" of Cornell university, his almaLeather
mater, and to the aiding of Ameni-G o
canization of immigrants.
We have a variety of
War Issues course at the University
of Pennsylvania will be continued as
"War Issues and Reconstruction."
Registration for the second term, to Phone 1160-R
begin Jan. 6, will take place Friday.

The following c sualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the Acerican Expeditionary Forc-
es: Killed in action, 85; died of
wounds, 58; died of accident and oth-
er causes, 13; died in airplane acci-
dent, 1; died of disease, 208; wound-
ed severely, 571; wounded, degree un-
determined 760; wounded slightly,
1,271; missing in action, 261. Total,
3,228.
French Hotel Owners Boycott Aliens
Paris, Dec. 18.-French hotel men
have decided to boycott alien enemies.
The general syndicate of hotel men
announce that for 10 years it will not
receive a native of an enemy coun-
try ®ather as a guest or an employe.
It is understood that this decision
will be adopted, by hotel men in all
Allied .countries.
Daily advertising is profitable.-Adv.

We make our own baked goods.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

i

TAKE

ONE

HOME

LYNDON, Photographer
719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
IBUY YOUR

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

Don't Forget Your Company Picture

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

U- m AT

SHEEHA N'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

--"-
.r...

your0
'Corona
6 Z r/y

'1r
in mmm+m
Vf

4 >;

Try -our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. main St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jacka
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Det oit Limited and Express Cars-7: o $.
+n-~ and hour-ly tcop :zo p. mn.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--8:48
a. 1n., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor,)
Local Cars East found-6 :oo a. m., ┬░44d
every two hours to 9 :05 p. M., 10:50 p. .
To Ypsilanti only, 1:45 p n, 22 1a n,
:10 a. i., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. n,, to
12: .. a .in
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. in.
Phone 1620.R

Although the ban has been raised on the
sale of typewriters for other than, war essen-
tial needs. 'it will be some time before orders
for new machines can be delivered.
I have on hand a few new Corona and
Hammond machines, also a fine stock of re-
built L. C. Smith, Underwood, Hammond and
tther high grade typewriters at PRE-WAR
prices. i typewriter makes a very desirable
as well as practical Christmas gift.

A
f

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

Liberty bonds will be accepted
given for payment if desired.

or time

I
{

O. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

1
3
{

L. ....... \.,.. ..., Z ' .r. .... + ""aw hi : S ai wwwwww+.'Hy, tii. t ."'

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings 'Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O. D. MORRILL

- Calendars
-Scrap Baooks

s

gifts and we are always glad to offer suggestions
it'Supply Store
x 11i 1S. University

Typewriters I y.
' Typewriting f
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Aroade Phone 17T1
First Floor

11

V

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