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December 19, 1918 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-19

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THE WEATHER
SNOWTOD RAIN

~Iaitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAYV AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 68. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS
r 1 -

ALUMNUS TO WRITE
1 .
1919 OPR;LYRIC
PROSPECTS GOOD
UNION SECURES HAINS, '09, AS
STUDENT MATERIAL IS
INCOMPLETE
MUSIC WRITERS MEET;
MATERIAL PROMISING
Director and Dancing Teacher Sought
By Those in Charge of
Production
Hamilton Donald Hains, '09, has con-
sented to write the book for the 1919
Michigan opera. The Union has for
some time been considering the ad-
visability of having a student write
this year's book. War conditions are
such that it was decided this is prac-
tically impossible.
Two books in the making were ac-
cepted last spring but the men writ-
ing them went into the service and
the books have not been completed.
Hains is a celebrated magazine
writer. He wrote the books for
"Michiganda" in 1908 and "Culture"
in 1909, judged by critic to be two
of the best operas tat the Union has
produced.
Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, chairman of
the opera, believes that the music
writers that met with him yesterday]
have considerable good material andj
sees no reason why the 1919 lyrics
should not equal, if not surpass, th'osei
of former years.
Several men of ability are being
considered for directors and a capa-
ble dancing teacher is sought. The
committee in charge believes thatt
with a good director, the snappy ly-
rics that are expected, and one of
Donald Hains' productions a banner3
opera is on the ticket for 1919.
WILSON SPEAKS l
OF BIG RECEPTION
(By Associated Perss)r
Paris, Dec. 18.- President Wilson
gave his impersonal impression to-
day at a meeting with the representa-
tives of the American press of his ex-
periences in France. At the sameI
time it was announced that the mem-E
bers of the commission would meet
daily. The President said: t
"I have been asked to say a fewc
words in regard to my reception here.
My reception was so tremendous that
I do not know what to say. I was de-..
lighted with it, but I was delighteda
with it for a reason that was not per-n
sonal.
"I was saying to several of ourb
French friends that I understood it be-v
cause I saw in the eyes of the crowde
just the feeling that I had for them,
and was aware that it was but a sort
of a reprisal feeling. That moved meF
very much, because that of course,
meant more than mere generous cordi-
ality on the part of these delightful
people. It meant a thoughtful back-n
ground to the thing which was very
welcome, and to come into that sortE
of feeling in this wonderfully beautiful
city, made a combination of emotionS
that would be experienced not more
than once in a life time. This is asv
well as I can put it on hand."a
MORE UNITS DESIGNATED BY o
PERSHING TO RETURN SOONt

Washington, Dec. 18. - Those unitse
which are designated for an earlyh
convoy home were made known to the
war department yesterday by Generalv
Pershing. They are the 27th engi-
neers, 346th field artillery, 153d, 482d,$
491st, 97th, and 102d aero squadrons,
also the 2d trench mortar battalion,
16th company of motor mechanics andn
British replacement draft No. 1, air3
service. Contrary to previous an-d
nouncement, the 82d division (ne- t
groes) will be held in France as a
reserve unit.
Officers Give Dinner-Dance at Uniond
The officers who are stationed in
Ann Arbor held a dinner on Tuesday t
evening at the new Union. It was
entirely a "get-together" affair as thed
plans for the dinner were only for-A
mulated during the day. Nearly all t
the officers were present, only a few t
being kept away to attend to neces- i

NAVAL UNIT MEN
MAY GO TOMORROW

It is not definitely known yet wheth
er the men in the naval unit here wil
be released tomorrow. If th dis
charge papers do not arrive all th
men will be given a furlough extend
ing over the entire Christmas vaca
tion.
The names of all those who passe
their physical examinations were sen
to the Great Lakes and the authori
ties here must wait for official notic
from there before they take any defi
nite action. The papers will be sen
here as soon as completed, but wheth
er- they come or not the men in th
unit can be sure of a Christmas a
home.
CANVAS CITY FOR RED
CROSSMEMBERSHIPS
SOLICITING OF 200 WORKERS
SATISFACTORY TO CHAIR-
MAN.
Ann Arbor's Christmas Roll Cal
began yesterday morning when ap-
proximately 200 workers under the di-
ection of "General" Charles Kyer and
his eight captains began a house tC
house canvas of the city. At the clos
Lf the day Mr. Kyer stated that they
were doing nicely. It is hoped by the
committee. that none will be over-
looked, but the work is so great that
it is possible that this may happen
and the public is asked in event of
this happening to get in touch with
one of the captains, or to call at the
Red Cross headquarters at 608 East
William street.
In order to retain membership in
the Red Cross it is necessary to make
a renewal and it is hoped that those
who joined before Sept. 1, of this
year will re-join promptly.
The work done during the war by
the Red Cross has not ended with
peace, for the demands upon it are as
urgent as ever and everyone's aid is
asked.
NAVY NEEDS 200,000 MEN
TO REPLACE DEMOBILIZED
Washington, Dec. 18. - Capt. H.
Laning, chief of the bureau of navi-
gation, announced yesterday that over
200,000 men must be recruited for
the navy next year to take the place
of men who enlisted for the war and
who are being demobilized.
After next July over 350,000 men
will be needed by the regular navy
and on shipping vessels. The regular
navy at present has 215,000 men and
165,000 of these enlisted since the war
began. More than 60 per cent of the
war recruits have asked for dis-
charges, Captain Laning said, and the
navy is honor bound to release them.
RETURN OF BATTLESHIPS FROM
OVERSEAS TO BE CELEBRATED
New York, Dec. 18. - Ten dread-
naughts and 20 destroyers of the
American naval fleet that operated in
European waters during the war are
expected to arrive in New York next
Sunday.
The great camouflaged warships
will be decorated with electric lights
and signs and it is expected that one
of the most spectacular pictures ever
seen in New York will be displayed
then. There will be a demonstration
every night of their stay in New York
harbor. Secretary of Navy Daniels
will arrive Monday in order to re-
view the ships.

8,000,000 Russians Die in World War
New York, Dec. 16.-Estimated Rus-
sian casualties in the world war at
nqt less than 8,000,000, of which
3,000,000 were injured, and 1,000,000'
;disabled for life, A. Back, director of
the Russian information bureau, de-
clared in an address before the for-
eign commerce club here today that
Russia's present political condition.is
d t( her exhaustion from war.
"She is lying in seas of blood and
tear_," he continued, "and further
nilliong of her people are facing
death, this time from starvation.
About 20.00 x,000 Russians will die
this winter unless the Allied coun-
tries render the unfortunate country
immediate help on a very generous
scale."

COUNCIL TO DECIDE
1-HOP LADERSHIP
Engineers Put Matter to Governing
Body of Campus Activities
Without Lits' Consent
HOGAN, MEMBER OF COUNCIL,
HEAD OF '19E COMMITTEE
The junior engineering class has
referred the question of whether the
engineers or the lits shall have charge
of the J-hop to the student council.
Charles T. Van Dusen, '19E, presi-
dent of the council, has called a meet-
ing for this afternoon to discuss the
subject.1
The engineering J-hop committee
was appointed yesterday. C. T. Hogan
was appointed chairman. The other
members are, Waldo G. Harbert, J. V.
Tracy, and Clayton Shoemacher. No
other business was transacted at the
class meeting.
Junior lits strenuously object to
the step which, the engineers have
taken in placing the matter of the
control of the J-hop before the stu-
dent council without their knowledge
of the fact.
Carl Johnson, president of the ju-
nior lit class, said last evening, "I
feel that the student council has act-
ed over hastily in bringing the mat-
ter to such a hasty decision. The hop
has beenNpostponed until a late date
in April, where it was formerly held
in February, and the momentous de-
cision is not needed at this time, or
until such a time when due consider-
ation can be given it. I believe, how-
ever, that the student council is the
proper body to decide such a matter,
providing that it acts unbiasedly, as it
should.
"The vote of Mr. Hogan can be
questioned on account of the fact that
he has also been elected chairman of
the committee which will represent
the engineers."
Prof. Louis A. Strauss said yester-
day that he felt the question of the
eontrol of the hop shouldsbe left to a
student body.
William A. Leitzinger, treasurer of
the junior lit class, said, "I think that
the precedent set forth by the author-
ities in control of intercollegiate ac-
tivities should be followed in this
case. They decided that because of
conditions brought about by the war,
participation in activities this past
year will have no bearing on the fu-
ture record of the participant.
"Neither the J-hop nor the soph
prom was held last yehr on account
of the war and for that reason I think
that the same action should be taken
in this case. Last 'year should be for-
gotten and the junior lits be allowed

HUNS FEAR NEW
ACTIONS Of POLES

German Socialists Indignant Over
Action on Part of Berlin
Government

No

GENERAL'STAFF OF POLAND
TO MOBILIZE 1,500,000 MEN
(By Associated Press)
Berne, Dec. 18.-According to dis-
patches here the Polish general staff
has called for mobilization of the
classes extending from 1883 to 1901.
It is said the mobilization will bring
1,500,000 men to the colors
Berlin, Dec. 18.-The Socialist news-
papers here express indignation over
the action of the Polish government in
ordering elections in the Polish parlia-
ment in the districts of Posen, Oppeln,
Beuthen, Kattowitz, Flatow, Danzig,
and Allenstein.
The papers say that this implies an-
nexation of great parts of German
eastern provinces in defiance of inter-
~national law, and they accuse the Poles
of nationalistic over-zeal and greed
for land.
Socialists Hate Hun Indifference
They declare that the Poles are at-
tempting to bring about an accom-
plished fact before the peace confer-
ence can meet. The papers condemn
the inactivity of the Berlin govern-
ment.
London, Dec. 18.-Unconfirmed re-
ports have reached London that Od-
essa, the great Russian seaport on the
Black Sea, has been occupied by the
forces of the Ukrainian leader, Pet-
lura, who is anti-German and a sep-
aratist.

to head the hop committee
spring."

this

ALLIES MAY SINK
HUN WAR SHIPS
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Dec. 18.-The American dele-
gates to the peace conference have re-
solved to advocate the sinking of the
enemy warships and resist a proposi-
tion to distribute them on the basis of
naval losses.
This announcement is made by those
in close touch with American repre-
sentatives, who, it is Added, feel that
such a position would result in a con-
tention and would materially support
President Wilson's contention that the
war was not based on aggression or
acquisition of property.
England, through Sir Eric Geddes,
first lord of the admiralty, had pre-
viously acquiesced to destroy the cap-
tured or surrendered warships, and it
is declared will continue to support
the United States, although it is ex-
pected that some of the lesser naval
powers may demand that the prizes be
distributed.
U. S. Legation Robbed by Germans
Washington, Dec. 18.-The Ameri-
can legation at Bucarest was found
to have been entered and robbed, ac-
cording to Vopicka, who returned here
from Joffy last Friday. Mr. Vopicka
reported to the state department that
goods valued at more than $100,000
were stolen from 22 trucks which had
been left at the legation by Ameri-
cans for safe keeping. The seal on
the doors was broken and the lega-
tion doors seriously damaged. Ger-
mans are believed to have been re-
sponsible.

:1
E
t
1
i
d
iC

Germans Refuse to Give Help
Belated dispatches from the Asso-
ciated Press correspondent at Odessa,
dated Dec. 10 and Dec. 11, report the
arrival of Petlura forces before Nik-
oliave, northwest of Odessa, Dec. 9.
The volunteer forces there retreated
and the Germans refused to interfere.
The banks there put their money on
board British destroyers in the Black
Sea and the city now is probably in
the hands of General Grigorieff, of the
Petlura forces.
Situation at Odessa Critical
The situation was reported to be ap-
proximately the same at Odessa, ex-
cept that Petlura himself was in
charge of the force marching on that
city. There is an abnormal popula-
tion in Odesso, of more than 1,200,000,
one-third of whom are refugees from
Great Russia.
The British naval and land forces in
Odessa have erected a defensive barb-
ed wire about the principal wharves.
They will protect the stores taken
from the Germans but otherwise, it is
said, will not interfere in the fighting
in Odessa.
PORTO RICAN FOOD
SCARCITY SERIOUS
San Juan, P. R., Dec. 18 (Corre-
spondence of the Associated Press).-
Many towns in the island are without
a single bag of rice and the shortage
in many localities has brought about
a condition- described by those in a
position to know as bordering on fam-
ine.
This food shortage is adding great-
ly to the seriousness of the influenza
epidemic and many deaths are attrib-
uted not so much to the disease itself
as to the complications brought about
by lack of food. ,
Shipments of rice from New Or-
leans and other Gulf ports which are
now from four to six weeks overdue
probably will bring some relief but
in the meantime the island authori-
ties anticipate much suffering and
hardship that at present they seem
powerless to -revent.
According to Albert E. Lee, federal
food commissioner and chairman of
the Porto Rico Food commission, the
question now is wholly one of trans-
portation and the commission has
considered the local situation so se-
rious that it has urged upon the Unit-
?d States shipping board the neces-
sity of immediate relief. Help has
been promised by the Shipping board
iut so far the local Food commission
has not been advised of the sailing of
any ships bringing rice.

BIG JACKIE SHOW
COMES NEXT WEEK
The Great Lakes Revue, which is
now on its way through Illinois to
Michigan, will appear in Ann Arbor
on Dec. 27, before completing its tour
at Detroit.
In every city where the sailors
have played the show houses were
filled. The big show has proved a
success on every occasion.
.The profits from the performances
will be given to the Navy Relief so-
ciety. In the smaller towns the per-
sonnel of the show gave a naval pa-
rade during the noon hour. The band
leads the procession with the cast of
the show following. Frequently they
stop and sing in the streets, much to
the delight of the crowds who assem-
ble to listen to such a rare treat.
The big cast which is now compos-'
ed of 110 men will follow the follow-
ing route commencing Wednesday at
South Bend and closing with an en-
gagement at Detroit starting Decem-
ber 29.
South Bend, two nights; Fort
Wayne, two nights; Grand Rapids,
three nights; Lansing, Battle Creek,
and Ann Arbor, one night each; and
Detroit from a week to 10 days.
ENGINEERING COURSES
WILL BE_INTENSIFIED
FRESHMAN ENROLLMENT OF 450
LARGEST IN RECORD OF
COLLEGE
In the midst of the work of regis-
tering what is expected to be the larg-
est freshman class ever enrolled in
the college of engineering, professors
of this school are laying plans for a
year of intensive work which will make
up entirely for the time lost by the
men while in the S. A. T. C. Of the
900 men of the army, 275 naval unit
and over 275 men of the engineering
reserve will form an unprecedented
class for which professors are already
preparing schedules of hard work to
offset time lost earlier in the year.
In the opinion of Professor J. E.
Emswiler, the 450 freshmen, whQ are
left from the S. A. T. C. and are
ready to continue their courses, will
form an excellent class fully up to thej
standard of the college. It is expect-
ed, however, that failures in the
courses will enormously outnumber]
those of other years and tend to bring
the size of the class almost down to]
normal. Present conditions have made
it impossible to handle the men witht
the existing laboratry facilities and1
many classes in chemistry and phys-]
ics have never had laboratory work.
More room may be given to these
classes after Christmas and larger
laboratories, which are needed, may
be installed this year. The difficultiesd
under which the school is laboringi
are being rapidly cleared away and
the work will be up to standard be-t
fore the end of the term.
One of the strongest indications of1
improved conditions is the interest
with which students and instructorst
are discussing the matter of holdingz
the usual engineering exhibit which
has not been given since May, 1916.
As in the past, all the work of the
school is to be demonstrated for the
public during the spring and there
will be shown exhibits covering al-
most every branch of modern engi-t
neering. The Engineering society hase
been first to take consideration of the
matter this year and will shortly placeI
it under consideration for the col-
lege. The work is to be handled by

a committee appointed from among
the various classes of the school.
RE-ENROLLMENT FIGURES
SHOW MARKED DECREASE
Total re-enrollments in the several
colleges of the University are con-]
tinually increasing, although the in-
formation shows that the number of
men who enrolled yesterday is not ast
large as that of the day before. It isf
expected that the numbers will grad-t
ually decrease from now until vaca-
tion, but that they will be larger dur-i
ing the first few days after the Christ-i
mas vacation.t
Some of the men recently discharg-
ed from the S. A. T. C. returned to
their homes immediately and will not
re-enroll until next month. To thiss
number will be added that of the stu-f
dents in the naval unit, who expectt
to receive their release the latter part c
of this week.1

POPEAPPEAS TO
PRESIDITTOAID1
ALL NEW NATINS
AMERICAN HEAD BELIEVES THAT
WORLD LEAGUE WOULD HELP
BRITISH
ENGLAND TO WELCOME
WILSON IN FORTNIGHT
Italian King on Way to Attend Peace
Conference to be Held at Ver-
sailles Next Month
(By Associated Press)
London, Dec. 18.-The Press asso-
ciation issues an official statement
that President Wilson is coming to
London earlier than is expected. The
date has not been definitely fixed but
he is expected with.in a fortnight.
Paris, Dec. 18.- The Papal letter
presented to President Wilson by
Cerretti, thePapal under secretary of
state, pleaded for assistance on be-
half of all oppressed nationalities, and
especially Armenia and Poland. The
Pope's letter also expressed the hope
of a just and durable peace be-
ing reached bythe peace congress.
Pope Seeks Aid for Bohemia
Pope Benedict also spoke In be-
half of the new countries arising from
the partition of the dual monarchy,
mentioning especially Bohemia. He
asked President Wilson to help them
realize their ambitions regardless of
rites and religion.
Paris, Dec. 18.-After a few days
of getting views of leaders . in Paris
President Wilson closest adviser says
he has seen no reason to change his
belief that the foundation of a leage
of nations is unseparable from the
actual peace treaty itself.
World League Would }Help England
Chief advisers say that the Presi-
dent, in explaining his de ltion of-
the freedom of the seas, reassures
Premier Lloyd George that he has
no intention of reducing the British
navy to a point of endangering the
empire, but will emphasize that the
plan of a league will strengthen the
empire.
King Victor Emmanuel, who Is ex-
pected to arrive on Thursday, al-
ready has been fully advised of the
President's plans to confer with Count
de Celli, the Italian ambassador to
the United States. The hope is ex-
pressed by those surrounding the
President that exchange of views will
clear away any particular - misunder-
standing.
No Nation Can Be Master
The Conference will start with all
conflicts removed and any outstand-
ing differences of opinions that re-
main will be settled at the peace
table.
The President has taken every op-
portunity to impress his views, it is
said by those who are in a position
to speak ;or him, that no nation can
assume the role of master.
EXTENSION COURSES
POSTPONED BY FLU
Due to the re'newal of the influenza
two of the University extension cours-
es have -been postponed.
The class in sociology 28 which
Prof. A. E. Wood was to have held
in Detroit on Friday, Dec. 20, has
been postponed until Jai. 3, as he is
ill with an attack of influenza.

On account of the severity of the
epidemic in Saginaw, Prof. T. E. Ran-
kin will be unable to meet his course
in short-story writing on Dec. 21 in
that city.
Prof. W. R. Humphreys will meet
his class in English 24 on Jan. 4, in
Detroit.
With these exceptions all other ex-
tension courses will be discontinued
through the holidays and will resume
their work on Jan. 8.
Members of the faculty will go to
near-by cities to deliver lectures
more extensively after Christmas than
they have during the fall.
House Passes Uniform Bill
Washington, Dec. 18. - All, men
who served in the nation's flguting
forces during the war may retain
their uniforms after they are dis-
charged, according to a bill which
has been passed by the house.

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