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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 18, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WD

FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
JNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ished every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
. of Student Publications.
ER OF TIIE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local news pub-
-erein.
red at the postoffice ,at Ann Arbor,
an, as second class matter.
riptions by carrier or mail, $3. 50.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building..
es: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
nunications not to exceed 300 words,
d, the signature not dcessarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faith, and
of events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
nailed to the oflice.
gned communications will receive no
ration. No manuscript will be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
nts expressed in the communications.
I C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
Makinson..........business Manager

R. Osius, Jr...........City
ite Clark .........Night
. Martin.......relegraph
A. Bernstein ............Sport
H. Riorden..........Military
Guernsey...........Women's
.hlbaert............Associate
Davis............Literary

and the need for Red Cross service is
as great as ever. The great war did
not put an end to the world's misery,
although it may have relieved our own
particular present share of .it. And
the duty of helping the other fellow, no
matter how far away or different from
ourselves he may be, is as urgent and
as worth while in the performance as
ever, and, like washing one's face, it
cannot be done once and for all.
We of the University of Michigan
have celebrated the close of the world
tragedy with noise and jubilation and
feelings of thankfulness. We are go-
ing back to the life we love, the Uni-
versity of the old days, instead of try-
ing to live the impossible dual exist-
ence of the student-soldier.
We and our families are planning
the biggest and merriest home-coming
we have known in years, and there
will be no end of fellowship and gen-
erosity and Christmas self-forgetful-
ness-among ourselves. We are tell-
ing ourselves that we wouldlike to
extend our happiness to the whole
world. Now comes the Red Cross and
offers to make real what would oth-'
erwise be a passing emotion of bene-
ficence. Will we, Michigan students,
by shortsightedness or carelessness,
fail to take the chance when it comes
to us, 'to help put a little of Christ-
mas into every day of the year for
the needy of the world? We are not
true Michigan men and women if we
do.
They tell us that the German White
Book is to be published in two or three
volumes. Experience with the Mich-
iganensian leads us to expect not more
than one, however.
Repairing fraternity houses and
lawns demonstrates that there was no
truth in the rumor that S. A. T. C.
stood for Saturday Afternoon Tea
Club.

Eci or
FEdi1tor
Edito:
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
editor

id A. Gaines.....Advertising' Manager
L. Abele.......Publication Manager
. M. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
Landis Paul G. Weber
W. Porter Philip Ringer
Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
et Christie llerman Lustfield
Qllis Bowen Schumacher
pel Henry O'Brien
rozier Renaud Sherwood
U. Lane Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFF
B. Covell Robert r. McKean
d Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Welsh Wm.,A. Leitzinger
NESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1918.
we Editor-Renaud Sherwood

Tub'em Well, Say
British ledicos
London - (Correspondence of the
Associated Press) .-A moving picture
audience in bath tubs through which
warm water flows is the entertain-
ment oddity provided in film shows
by the American Y. M. C. A. at the
hospital under the shadows of King's
college, Cambridge, where vounded
men from France are treated. In one
ward certain of the patexns who have
had very serious, septic wounds are
having the water treatment.
To look at these men one night
think they were lying comfortably in
ben propped up with pillows. They
are really sitting in bath tubs in wat-
er to their waists. A constant stream
of water with a temperature of niney-
eight is kept running through the tub,
purifying and cleansing the wounds,
which have no oter dressing. A
kind or magnified lap-board covers
the top of the tub, and is min turn co-
Bred by a long, bright p atch quit.
And thereth m >en sit on air cushon
leaning against air pillo es, da a:
night, sometimcs for-weeks at a time.
Only the most serious cases are put
into these baths, n:en who otherwise
have little chance of recovery and
none without the amputation of a
limb. But never yet has a case so
treated been lost.
"It's beastly unconiforable the first
week," said the record case of the
ward, a British Toninmy who was for
11 weeks in the bath. -"Your ls
ache, and you have the jyiatr rush.
But in a week, at most, you get over
that, and then it is imore comfort-
able than being in bed. In fact, after
they put you back in bed you can't
sleep for a while, it's so hard.
The American Y. 2l. C. A. has been
sending these men "movies" twice a
week. A screen has been arranged
at one end of the hut and there all the
screen favorities play their parts
while the men sit comfortably in their
warm tubs And when the show is
over all they have to do is to turn
out the lights and go to sleep.
T. W. C. A. WILL NOT VA C A T E1
llAmRiOLR (T M UNTIL 1919
It was decided yesterday that the
Unversity Y. W. C. A. will remain
at Barbour gymnasium the rest of
this year. The expense of moving
would be considerable, and the two
N omen's organizations have worked
so well together the past months, giv-
ing mutual support, that it was deem-
ed advisable, if not better, for the
Y. W. C. A. to remain where it is. The
space in the gymnasium that the Y
is .occupying is not needed for other
purposes at present and the location
has been exceedingly satisfactory.
There will be no lunch room con-
nected with the Y. W. C. A., the Inn
at Lane hall serving that purpose. It
is under the direction of the S. C. A.
and is open to both men and women.
When the Y inn- was moved from
Newberry to Lane hall last summer
it increased its function and the of-
ficers of the University Y. W. C. A.
think it unnecessary to have another
one at Barbour gymnasium.
O)FFICERS TO LEAVE WIIE l ALL
DISCHARGES ARE CHECKED OFF
No orders relating to the discharge
of the S. A. T. C. officers who are
stationed in Ann Arbor have been re-
ceived as yet. The mass of papers
that were made out in connection
with the discharges have not all been
checked over, but the officers will
have the work finished within a day

or two and will then be ready to
leave.3

I1om1Cn
The class in playground work will
meet at 1 o'clock this afternoon.
Basketball practice will be held for
£reshinen and sophomores at 3 o'clock
and for juniors at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon.
Vesper serives will be held at 4
o'clock this afternoon.

It is better this year than ever before anid the price
ONLY 50c

The girls who were notified by card
that they were elected to the freshman
Girls' Glee club are asked to report
for an important meeting at 3 o'clock
this afternoon in Sarah Caswell An-
!ell hall.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

f

1F
I

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are re-
ported today by the commanding gen-I
ero: of the American Expeditionary
Yorces: Killed in action, 263; died of
wounds, 119; died of accident and
other causes. 19; died in airplane ac-
eident, 2; died of disease, 271; wound-
ed severely, 1,737; wounded, degree
undetermined, 51; wounded slightly,
154; missing in action 537. Total,
3,153.
1 ( SE SNAPPY UNIFORMS SURE
.lE AAN TO ENJOY JAFE
Manchester, Eng.-(Correspondence
of the Associated Press).-Describing
the celebration of peace in London
the( Guardian's London correspondent
writes:
"Another incident was that a very
large plain American officer, with two
short plain American officers, march-
eA ui from Trafalgar Square to Lei-
cester Square kissing every girl they
met, the leader shouting 'Next, please.'
IBefore they got to the square they had
a following of a dozen unkissed girls
drawig their attention to the fact."
Praft Boards Assist Returned SoldIersl
Annapolis, Md., Dec. 17.-Local anid
district draft boards will maintain
informal organizations after Jan. 1,
1919, to assist employment bureaus
in seeking work for returned soldiers,
Secretary Baker )said in an address
today at the governors' cenference
here. The draft boards are to be for-
mally dissolved at the end of the
month, it was, stated.
Governors from 355 states in-
cluding Governor Sleeper, Michigan,
are i4 attendance at the conference.
Ai s --nr. r 1 nir V. i, n - Alnn.va

-Efar Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S.-Main 330 S. State St.
/Nickels Arcade)
S. A.T.r"C
Don't Forget Your Company Picture
TAKE ONE HOME
LYNDON, Photographer
719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

When you go home
Take with you a

MICHIGAN

CALENDAR

PASSING OF THE S. A. T. C. I

!n the opinion of many the S. A.
''. C. was more or less of a failure,
while in that of perhaps as many
others, it was a success And a suc-
cess it was, in that it accomplished
its purpose, which, according to a
letter from the war department, was
to allow college students to continue
their scholastic work and at the same
tine prepare themselves along mili-
tary lines, so that they would be ready
when needed by the government, and
tl- supply officer material.
The last of these it did without
question, as many men had left for
-olicers' training camps and were do-
ing the work very creditably. Others
had already been chosen, in fact, were
all ready to leave for such camps,
when the armistice was signed. In
addition there were many who would
have been recommended for later
camps.
As to whether the men, were able
to continue their scholastic work
there is some questin. Undoubtedly,
at first men were cmpelled to miss
a large number of their classes, but
this was due more to the influenza
epidemic than to the military organi-
zation. As the epidemic subsided and
arrangements to fit the new condi-
tions were made, the absences from
classes diminished and more time for
study was allowed. After Influenza
disappearedthe work of the S. A. T.
C adcome to coincide well enough
with the academic so that it was sel-
dom, necessary for a man to miss
glasses more than once in 10 days,
and it was usually possible for him to
attend part of his classes even on that
day.
Whpn the compulsory study rule
went into effect, men did not com-
plain of too little time to study, but
too much. Even for four or five weeks
before this the men had sufficient
time during the day to themselves to
prepare their scholastic work if they
!0 "hoie.
It was even demonstrated by cer-
tan men in the S. A. T. C. it was
possible, if one had suf Icient desire,
to keep up with college work and
not neglect military duties.
Now that the men are discharged
most of them agree that they are at
least glad to haye gone through the
experience and will always look back
upon the time spent in the S. A. T.
C. with pleasant memories.
As a permanent institution, it is
clear that the S. A. T. C. idea is an
impossible one, but in an emergency
it served its purpose.
THE CHRISTMAS ROLL CALL
With the slogan of "All you need
is a heart and a dollar" the Red Cross
begins today its Christmas Roll Call
campaign. Some time before you go
home you are going to be asked to
join this organization, which more
than any other has alleviated the hor-
rors and suffering caused by the great
war. Perhaps you have joined the
Red Cross before, and perhaps you
have supported it generously by con-
tributions while the war was on, but
your mxership may have run out,

Grand Duchess Anastasie of Meck-
lenburg-Schwerin says that Germnany
blundered. Now the kaiser is sure
to commit suicide.

Better make those payments on
your bonds. Then when you read the
announcements of the fifth loan you
"won't be bothered."
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TO BE
ORGANIZED AFTER VACATION
Efforts will be made to' re-estab-
lish the Symphony orchestra imme-
diately after the Christmas holidays.
This is not a strictly student organi-
zation, since any person in any way
connected with the University may
secure a place in it if they have the
requisite ability.,
Students who wish to try out for
it should bring their instruments
with them after the holidays as a call
will be made for material directly
upon the re-opening of the University.
The symphony orchestra, along
with many other activities, had to be
abandoned this fall because of war
time conditions. Now that things are
more normal those who had it in
charge . in former years believe that
it can be successfully organized again.
In former years it has made success-
ful appearances at the twilight con-
certs of the School of Music.
Former Botany Instructor Here
Dr. A. H. W. Povah, former in-
structor in the botany department of
the University and now assistant pro-
fessor of forest-botany in New York I
State College of Forestry at Syra-
cuse, spent yesterday in Ann Arbor.
Dr. Povah was recently honorably
discharged from the field artillery
corps of the officers' training school,
Louisville, Ky. He will return to Sy-
racuse the first of the year.
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

tI

ON

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- A* .AT

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOKSTORE

ixtNvuy6--vwiy service-always.

---

q

MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS

Sho thand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

of CHRISTMAS

TOILET ARTICLES

PERFUMES

IVORY GOODS

CAMERAS

THERMOS BOTTLES

I

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sta.

AT

T EBERBACH&SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbox and Jackson
(October 27, 19x8)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:1o a.
Tn, and hourlyt to 9I1o p. M.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-,
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. in., 10:5o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. in., 12:26 a. in.,
i:o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. m., to
12 20"a M.
W AI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

rub'
Co.
kII

War-Time Pictures

Daily want ads bring results.

-- .

BOYS. I Have

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

You have made many pictures during these war times,

Pain Toe C'ordovan's
(Cordovan all over)
The Newest Pattern

which, from now on, will be historic.

Perhaps it's the boy

proudly marching away with his regiment, or home on leave;
or patriotic parades and demonstrations which have impressed
you, or it may be the "pictures from home" to him.
What more fitting gift could you give than a selection of
such prints in one of our attractive albums?

They are good looking and
only $12.00 per pair

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ........$4,000,000,00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O0 D. MORRILL
Typewriters L
Typewriting -.
Mimeographing

You had better get your pair before it is too late.

324 SO. STATE STREET
1123 SO. UNIVERSITY AVE.
711 PACKARD STREET

123 East Liberty Street, Cor. Fourth Ave.

Has moved to
Mokels Arcade Phone
First Floor

I.

I

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