100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 18, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER *ur tv
PROBABLY RAIN
JTODAY

juai~ti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

1,

1 - .. .. :

VOL. XXIX. No. 67. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

LIT EGISTR ATION
'EXPECTED TO ISE
TO PAST FIGURES
"oO S. A. T. C. MEN ALREADY EN-
ROLLED WITH SECRETARY
OF LIT SCHOOL
SUMMER ATTENDANC
LIKELY TO BE .LARGE
Enrollment in Literary College Has
Increased Daily Until Now 80
Men Are Signed Up -
Approximately 500 former S. A. T.
C. men have re-enrolled in the literary
college up until 5 o'clock yesterday.
This number together with that of the
civilian men students, makes a total,
of more than 850 men at present reg-
istered in the literary college.
Number Yet to be Heard From
To this number is still to be. add-
ed those .recently discharged from the
S. A. T. C. who have not yet reported,
and those in the navl unit awaiting
release. The number of men in the
various branches of the service that
will return to the University is not
known, but considering the number
that have come back thus far, it is
estimated before this school year is
over that the enrollment will rise to
the figures of last year.
Large Enrollment Expected
In October the literary college had
270 of its men in the naval unit and
1,076 in the S. A. T. C. The enroll-
ment in this college during the entire
year of 1917-18 was 1,600 men and
1,029 women.
It is the opinion of the University
officials that the summer session of
1919 will have the largest number
ever reached and that next fall will
show an enrollment equal to that in
normal times if not larger.
MANY ENTENTE NOTABLS
fDINE AT U. S. EMBASSY
U. S.. PRESIDENT SYMPATHIZES
WITH CLAIMS MADE BY
ITALY
(By Havas Agency)
Paris, Dec. 17. - The American am-
bassador, William G. Sharp, gave a
dinner this evening in honor of Pres-
ident and Madame Poincare, and
President and Mrs. Wilson.
The guests included the embassa-
dors to France, the presidents of the
senate and the chamber, the minis-
ters of marine and foreign affairs,
Marshals Joffre and Foch, and the
Prefect of the Seine, and their wives,
the American delegates to the peace
conference, and Generals Pershing,
Bliss and Harts.
Rain Pr'events Golf Game
The reception followed the dinner
at which many notable men of France
and the United States were present.
A great crowd massed in front of the
embassy acclaiming both presidents.
President and Mrs. Wilson went for
an automobile ride today in the out-
skirts of Paris. During the rainy
morning President Wilson worked in p
his study, being obligated to forego c
his expected trip to the golf links at
Versailles.
In the afternoon the President saw h
Count Micehi di Cellere, high com-
c
missioner of Italy for America, with
'whom President Wilson had several

important conferences on the George
Washington during the voyage from
the United States. I
Wilson Sympathizes with Italy 1
It is known that President Wilson
feels the warmest sympathy for Italy's 4
claims arising from the war, and the
President virtually told Count Cellere C
the extent to which he was willing to
support them during the forthcoming p
informal conferences with the pre- t
miers of the Entente governments. t
The President's last engagement for fc
the day was with Marshal Foch, giv- ti
ing President Wilson the opportunity t
to see for the first time the man who
had led the Allied armies to victory. la

SERGEANT FISCHER
GOES TO DETROIT
Serg.t-major Alfred Fischer, who
has been connected with the headquar-
ters company of the local S. A. T. C.
unit since its organization, received
his formal discharge from the army
yesterday.
He had been in the service for eight
months, being sent here last April
with the first training detachment of
army mechanics. He was made a ser-
geant shortly after coming here and
was soon promoted to sergeant-ma-
jor.
Sergeant-major Fischer will return
immediately to Detroit to resume his
duties under Mr. John A. Russell,
secretary and treasurer of the Detroit
Board of Commerce. His principal
work at present will be toward help-
ing returned soldiers obtain employ-
ment. In addition he will edit an
industrial magazine published by Mr.
Russell. Before being called into the
service he was associate editor of the
same magazine.
Besides Sergeant-major Fischer two
other men were discharged from
Company 17 yesterday. This leaves
only 126 men in the company.
The men in Company 17 are still
engaged in the various tasks in con-
nection with cleaning up the frater-
nity houses recently vacated by the
S A. T. C. In addition they have
been working at the qiartermaster's
department, wheretthere is much work
to do in connection with uniforms and
supplies.
Try 'em and Then
Feed 'em, at Trial
"Not guilty," was the jury's ver-
dict, given at the close of the Adelphi
House of Representatives' trial last
evening. The prisoner at the bar was
John Doe, treasurer of the organiza-
tion, charged with embezzlement.
During the progress of the trial
much testimony was offered, some
witnesses were good, some were not.
Of the more notorious were Governpr
Squeeker, of the state of Mishigum,
and Professors Tan Vine and Billy
Whobbs, of the University faculty.
Several students were called to thet
witness chair and closely examined.
The defendant was found guilty oft
over-extravagance at the Busy Bee1
and in Ypsi, but owing to the factt
that .all the money he had spent was1
his own, the state lost the case.
Of. the attorneys it may be saidr
that they handled the case very well,t
both proving conclusively that the
accused was not guilty. Judge Au-N
gust was awakened several times byI
their heated arguments. His Honort
listened with profound ignorance andc
instructed the jury with exceeding
impartiality in favor of the defense..
Flu Claims 59 P
Deaths in State
(By Associated Press) b
Lansing, Dec. 17.-Fifty-nine deaths
and 2,669 new cases of Spanish in-D
luenza were reported today to the
state board of health, the largest re-
port since the previous increase in A
ases has been noted. t
Most of the cases were from theM
maller towns, although some of the i
arger cities, which have been at the t
pidemic stage for weeks, showed in-v
reases. U

Among the reports were: I
Bay City, 70; Albion, 41; Battle s
Creek, 27; Flint, 14"; Calumet, 67;'
Lansing, 47; Ionia, 35; Kalamazoo,
20; Grand Rapids, 92; Big Rapids, 61;
Walkerville, 35; Saginaw, 91; Owosso, n
5; Detroit, 299; Hyland Park, 69. N
t
lopper Producers Form Association R
N\w York, Dec. 17. - Leading cop- c
er producers of the United States, b
akin, advantage of the Webb export
rade law, permitting them to unite
or the purpose of conducting foreign
rade, met hre today andtorganized
le Copper Exp,)rt ass;ociation.
The new body incorporated in the
iws of Delaware, with a capital of
250,000,000, seven per cent prefer-
ed stock, and 500 shares of common
tock of no par value. It will handle

I

All You Need Is a Heart and a
Dollar; Help the Red Cross Serve
(By Havas Agency.)
Berne, Dec. 17.-American prisoners arriving here informed the
Red Cross that the Russians at Rastatt, Germany, are dying at the
rate of about six or eight daily from starvation. The Americans were
given rifles by the German guards to protect their food stores from
the Russians, who threatened to raid the American compound.
Every day's news brings stories like this pitiful appeal to the
Red Cross. Today the Christmas Roll Call drive for members starts
in Ann Arbor. Every house, factory and business place will be can-
vassed by the 200 solicitors who have volnteered for the work.
"All you need is a heart and a dollar." The Red Cross is'not look-
ing for large contributions in this drive. It asks only for the support
of the average American in yearly or magazine subscriptions of $1
or $2 respectively. Every student can afford what the Red Cross
asks.
Only memberships accepted after Sept. 1, 1918, will be counted in
this Roll Call. If the solicitor does not find you at home, call at the
local Red Cross headquarters, 508 East William street, and become a
member. With a membership comes a flag, a button, and 10 Red Cross
Christmas seals.
Get your name on the Christmas Roll Call!

GIFTS FOR KIDDIES
POURING IN FAST
Christmas gifts are coming in rap-
idly at the receiving station at Bar-
mour gymnasium. Tin soldiers and
blocks as well as dolls and money
are being received by the social serv-
ice committee. Christmas cards for
older patients at the hospitals are
coming in and more are wanted. The
league houses have not answered the
call of Christmas but they still have
the opportunity to turn in their thank
offerings. Two dolls are still to be
dressed and money is needed for
Christmas work.
At the Symphonic league party to
be held this afternoon a subscription
will be taken for this cause. In ad-
dition to caring for a family, Alum-
nae house has pledged $5 for the chil
dren's Christmas. The gifts to the
hospital children will be distributed
by the social service committee, which
represents both the Y. W. C. A. and
the Women's league. It comprises the
following girls: Lois DeVries, '21, and
Floribel Ellis, '20, chairmen; Wanda
Gillingham, '21, Elizabeth Wylie, '20,
Helen Masters, '21, Rose Sturmer,
'20, Glaydes Daum, '20, and Marie
Bloom, '20.
Khaki or Silk,
Ask .fx-Soldiers

U

ENGINEERS MIKE FIGHT
FOR J-HOP__LEADER1SHIR
TWO JUNIOR CLASSES CLAIM THE
PRIVILEGE OF MANAGING
HOP THIS YEAR
A fight will be put up by the junior
engineers to gain leadership of the
hop this year.
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, said last
night, "Last year was the lits' turn
to lead the hop and if they did not
have the party it's their hard luck.
We will make a fight to get control
of it this year.
"Had the sophomore prom been held
last year we would have controlled
it, but it was not and this is the reg-
ular year for the lits. We have con-
ceded it to them. Although the prom
is not as big an event as the hop it
is the biggest sophomore social ac-
tivity.
"For the same reason that we gave
the running of the prom to the lits,
I feel that we should have the hop
this year in spite of the fact that the
party did not come off last year."
The junior literary class claims the
right to promote and lead the hop
this eyar as, owing to war conditions,
it was not put on last year when it
was their time to run it. Unless it can
be decided between the two classes
the student council will be called up-
on to make the decision.
Members of the engineer J-hop com-
mittee have not been named as the
meeting of the officers of the class
scheduled for last night has been
postponed until this afternoon just
before the class meeting.
Until this committee is appointed
and it is decided who will have con-
trol of the hop no definite plans can
be made.
Date Announced for Detroit Show
Detroit.- (Correspondence of the
Associated Press).-The annual De-
roit automobile show is to be held
March 1 to 8, inclusive. Great interest
s being shown in the coming exposi-
ion, the first Michigan show for
which a date has yet been decided
upon. It is understodd that Grand

ENSIGN ROBERTS oVISES
GOBS TO KEEP INSURANE
LOW GOVERNMENT RATES MAKE
THIS A COMPARATIVELY EASY
MATTER

The wise ex-gob will keep his gov-
ernment insurance, is the opinion of
Ensign R. A. Roberts, U. S. N. of the
Great Lakes naval training - station.
Ensign Roberts spoke before the nav-
al unit in the auditorium of Univer-
sity hall yesterday afternoon. The pur-
pose of his lecture was to encourage
the men of the unit to continue their
insurance. This was taken out at
enlistment and the men now have the
opportunity to discontinue it.
Government Insurance Cheapest
He gave several reasons why the
men should continue this insurance.
In the first place, he said, it is abso-
lutely safe because it is backed by the
government and is not like insurance
taken out with a private concern.
Moreover, it is 20 to 35 per cent
cheaper than that taken out in a pri-
vate company.
Then, he continued, these policies
may be changed to some other form
five years after the end of the war.
They may be changed to 20 payment
life, straight life and many other
forms.
He cautioned the men not to drop
the insurance, because it was given
them at this reduced rate by the gov-
ernment as a recognition of the sac-
rifice they made when they offered
their, services to Uncle Sam.
Praises Local Unit
"The naval unit here is certainly
in exceedingly excellent condition,"
he said. "They are well equipped, and
well drilled. It is a fine naval unit
indeed."
He then told the men that those
who wished to continue their insur-
ance should make out the check pay-
able to the treasurer of the United
States and se it to the bureau of
war risks in tli -treasury department,a
Washington, D. C.
Any questions concerning 'allot-
ments or Liberty Bonds may be ad-3
dressed to Lieut. R. A. Roberts, in-
surance officer, Great Lakes, Ill.

To wear it or not to wear it, that
is the question. "It" is the military
uniform of these United States and has
been worn more or less by all brave
soldiers in the standing army ofrthe
University of Michigan since way
back in October, 1918.
Now, however, somebody has been
so inconsiderate as to' stop the war
just when so many of the aforemen-
tioned brave soldiers have donned
their "tailormade khakis." Further-'
more, some foolish persons, probably
the committee on Hays and Beans at
Washington, have shown their author-
ity by stipulating in the contract that
boys in the students' army training
corps, after demobilization, may or
may not wear their uniforms, just as
the spirit moves them. And now to
thicken the plot, a vacation is forc-
ed, yea, literally forced upon them,
and they are between the "divil and
the deep blue sea."
The arguments for and against the
above - mentioned proposition are
equally stupendous. On the one hand
imagine what a dash Top Sergeant
Blinkety Blank would make should he
appear on the main street of his home
village, clad in the noble military
raiment of his Uncle Sam, splotched
here and there with the terrible mud
from the trenches where once was
State street. Everybody from a mix-
ture of curiosity and admiration
(most curiosity), would gather round
to hear the sergeant's gruesome tales
of active service on the western front
-yard of some frat house. Thus, Ser-
geant Blank's pppularity would be as-
sured no matter what his past record
had been and there seems no reason
for continuing the discussion.
But the alternative is still to be
heard from.
Sergeant Blank has, within the last;
few days, walked along State street
and gazed longingly at the Christmas
exhibitions in the haberdashery win-
dows. There, are displayed pepper-1
mint candy shirts, patriotic hosiery
and neckwear that would put the rain-
bow to shame. And khaki is so com-
mon now as to be-well, common.
There is some danger that Seri-
geant Blank may be in the case of,
the proverbial mule who starved tot
death .between two equally luscious
baskets of oats. But as even this re-
marklably mild December weather is
not conducive to South Sea island
attire, it is probable that the mascu-
line Flora McFlimseys will have to
reach some decision, even if it is
necessary to call in the landlady for
advice.t

MILSON TAKES UP
RUSSIAN PROBLEM
WITH FRENCHMEN
ONSK GOVERNMENT IN HANDS OF
* DICTATOR AND SPLIT INTO
FACTIONS
BOLSHEVIKI EVACUATE
PETROGRAD; GO SOUTH
Corps of Experts to Aid Entente in
Final Solution of Important
Conference Question
(By Associated Press)
Stockholm, Dec. 17. - The newspa-
pers here say that travelers arriving
from Petrograd claim that the Mb.-
sheviki have begun the evacuation
of the Russian capital preparatory to
proceeding to Nizhni Novgorod.
Washington, Dec. 17. - The Russian
problem has been taken up by Presi-
dent Wilson with French statesmen,
it was learned here today, and the de-
termination upon a definite policy,
upon which all the Allied countries
and the United States will agree, will
be one of the first things to be un-
dertaken at the preliminary meetings,
which are to precede the peace con-
ference.
Russia i Problems Still Puzzling
Russia's plight and the attitude to
be adopted by the victorious associ-
ated nations is recognized as one of
the most serious problems of the con-
ference. Every proposed solution, so
far, is said to have been blocked by
the unanswered question of who Is
qualified, to speak for the Russian
people. The government at Onsk, of
which the United States and other
governments have expected much, is
now in the hands of a dictator and
split into factions, but the Entente
nations have not given up hope that
the authorities there may yet evolve
a stable form of government.
Corps of Experts to Solve Problem
It is stated that in considering
whether a joint expedition should be
sent to deal with, and thereby inter-
fere with Russia's internal affairs, the
representatives of the United States
and the Allies must decide whether
the Bolshevik movement is such a
menace to civilization as to demand
extraordinary steps to eliminate it.
To aid them in the conferences
with the Allied nations, President
Wilson has taken a corps of Russian
experts with him to Paris.
SENATE SPEEDS PASSAGE
Of WAR REVENUE 0BILL
CONGRESS PROPOSES TO LOWER
THREE CENT LETTER RATE
TO OLD LEVEL
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 17.-Rapid -pro-
gress on the war revenue bill was
made today by the. senate with the
leaders apparently united to hasten its
passage by late this week or at least
before the holidays.
Excess Profits Rates Cut
War excess profits rates for 1919,
ranging from 30 to 80 per cent as
revised by the finance committee and
estimated to raise $2,400,000,000, as
compared with $3,200,000,006 under
the house bill.
Individual income sur taxes, ranginf

from 65 per cent, as revised by the
finance committee and designed to se-
cure $1,045,069,000, as compared with
$1,068,000,000 under the house bill,
Letter Rate Reduced to Two Cents
Rates of $6.40 and $2.20 per gallon
respectively on distilled spirits for
beverage and non-beverage liquids, as
reducedrfrom therrespective $8 and
$4.40 per gallon rates of the house
bill, and estimated to raise $450,000,-
s00, as against $760,000,000 under the
house draft.
_Taxes on freight, passenger, ex-
ress, Pullman and oil pipe line trans-
portation, as proposed in the finance
committee's revision, and estimated to
yield $229,000,000; and repeal on July
1, next, of the law increasing first
class mail rates from two to three
cents on ounce, and providing an re-
toration of the old pre-war rates, in-
rolving a revenue reduction of about

Kapics and Calumet will also have
hows this season., Transfer War Aims Course to U-Hall
The lectures of, the War Aims
Take Down Mess Shacks at Union course, which heretofore have been
Work will begin today on the re- given in Hill auditorium, will be given
moval of the mess shacks from the in University hall beginning Thurs-
Michigan Union grounds. It is thought day of this week. The change has
hat the work will take a 'couple of been made because of the great de-
weeks. The sheds used by the me- crease in attendance, since so many
hanics for a motor laboratory will of the S. A. T. C. men have left the
e left up during the winter. University.

i

400 of 56th Arrive at Camp Custer
Camp Custer, Dec. 17.-Four hund-
red of the 56th division reached Camp
Custer tonight from France by way
of Camp Eustia, Va., for demobiliza-

Christmas Vesper Service
Address-Lloyd C. Douglas
Music-Glee Club
Barbour Gymasium 4 O'clock Today

LLOYD DOUGLAS TO SPEAK; GLEE
CLUB TO SING AT VESPERS
A Christmas talk by Rev. Lloyd C.
Douglas and Girls' Glee club carols
will be the features of Y. W. C. A. yes-
per services 'to be held at 4 o'clock
this afternoon at Barbour gymnasium.
Among the selections to be sung by
the Glee club are "God Rest.Ye, Mer-
ry Gentlemen," "Silent Night," "The
First Noel," "Little 'Town of Bethle-
hem," and "Hark, the Herald Angels
Sing." A real Christmas welcome will
be given to all who come.

copper exports, and is expected to
eliminate competition and consequent
.cost of operations, and in other ways
stabilize the metal industry.

I

- v .__, .

- ..--.,

$50,000,000.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan