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December 15, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY;

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FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday
gthe university year by the Board in
Ao of Student Publications.
BER OF THF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively.entitled
euse for republication of all news dis-
s credited to it or not otherwise credited
s paper and also the local news pub-
herein.
ered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
gan, as becond class matter.
scriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
cs: Ann Arbor Press Building.
nes: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
imunications not to exceedS300 words,
ned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
M print, but as an evidence of faith, and
's of events will be published in TVhe
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to tbe ,office.
signed comiiiunications will receive no
eration. No manuscript will be re-
funless the' writer incloses postage.
Daily does ot necessarily endorse the
ents expressed in the communications.
e C.Mighell....... Managing Editor
d Makinson.........]iusiness Manager

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Cor. State and William Sts.
10:30 o'clock
Public Worship and Sermnon
by
LLOYDC . DOUGLAS
en
"A VISION ON THE HILL"
Third sermon in the series
"Visions and Ventures"
12:00 o'clock
Bible Class for
University Women
Led by Mrs. Douglas

N jLQ
Iiii

R. Osius, Jr...........City]
rite Clark............Night]
C. J Martin........Telegraph7
A. Bernstein.... ...port]
I H. Riorden..........Military3
Guernsey...........Women'sl
K. Ehlbert.. ........Associate]
L Davis............Literary

Edhor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor.1
Editor
Editor

LeGrand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
AgnesL Abele.....Publication Manager
id M. Major.....Circulation Manager
ISSUE E4DITORS
David Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
MrIatet Christie Herman Lustfield
grene llis Bowen Schumacher
Edna A el Henry O'Brien
Marie 4rzier Renaud Sherwood
Mary D. bane'Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFF
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
Edward.Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R. Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1918.
Jssue Edtor-Paul G. Weber
BOTH KINDS OF GIVING
Giving, here and there and every-
where, of money and comforts and
beauty and cheer, is especially the
spirit of this Christmas when the
boys are out of the trenches and peace
has come with victory and the whole
world is light-hearted , and kindly.
But in giving free expression to the
sharing impulse which we all have
now, let us not forget the giving and
the lending which is a duty and an
obligation as well as a pleasure.
Students have payments on their
Fourth Liberty Loan bonds to make;
the government needs the income de-
rived from, War Savings and Thrift
Stamps in its reconstruction work;
pledges to the United War Work fund
are due; the Red Cross and other re-
lief organizations must continue their
work among stricken peoples, wound-
ed 'soldiers, and needy civilians in
this country. Americans have learn-
ed in this war how to give largely
and generously and above all, effi-
ciently. Efficient, organized, thought-
ful giving is not as much fun as
oareless, individual, impulsive giving,
but ts results are far greater, if one
is seeking the good of the beneficiary
rather than the soul-satisfaction of
the benefactor. And there is no rea-
son why the two cannot exist togeth-
er. There should be plenty of both
kinds of giving this Christmas, and
no student should spend his entire
stock of enthusiasm and money on
either. If we give in the big ways
and in the small, we will make this
the best Christmas we've ever had
and the world so much the happier
because of whatever part we possess
in controlling its sources of happi-
ness.
WINTER AND ATHLETICS
Down at Ferry field the caretakers
have finished putting the cover on
the grandstand. But over at Water-
man gym, workmen will soon begin
tearing down the temporary construc-
tion, putting the building in shape for
its normal use, as a gymnasium.
The days of winter athletics are
upon us. While there is no intention
to belittle the merits of skating and
sleighing and hiking as splendid ex-
ercise and sport, the campus should
appreciate to its fullest extent the
value of our great indoor playground.
Basketball has already started. Au-
thorities in physical training unite in
saying that this game shares with
furnishing the best all-round exercise
of any sport. The hundreds of Uni-
versity men who 'learned to play in
high school should continue to get a
'world of fun out of the game. There
are four courts at Waterman gym, and
every afternoon should find them
'busy.
Practice for the Varsity basketball
team has already begun. A good
squad is out, but it should be doubled
in size. Michigan is out to erase the

stain of last year's unfortunate rec-
ord. The court game is regarded as
a very major sport among our Con-
ference rivals, and we should not rest
until our standing in this respect is as
rood as in football or baseball.

Work in track is also under way.
It seems a long time until June 7, and
the Big Ten chamnpionship games.
But a successful season in track must
be preceeded by months of work. At
least four indoor meets are prob-
able for the late winter. To repeat at
these our attainments 'of last spring'
demands the efforts of every Michigan
man who can do anything in track.
In addition to those who are out for
Varsity teams, there are dozens of up-
perclassmen on the campus who
would find the gymnasium habit a
very good one to acquire. An hour
in the late afternoon spent exercis-
ing on the machines, or playing hand-
ball, followed by a good shower and
rubdown, keeps him in shape for his
round of studies and campus activ-
ities.
The campus turns to Waterman
gymnasium for its exercise and games
of the winter months.

First
Baptist
Church
Huron Street below Sate
MORNING WORSHIP
10:30
Sermon by
J. M. WELLS
"THE ADVENTURE OF LIFE"
11:50 to 12:40
Guild Class meets in the Church
6:30 P. M.
Guild Meeting, led by
PRIVATE CARSON
Little old home town Main street
is going to look better to some people
this year than it ever has before.
Vesper services will be held at 4
o'clock Wednesday afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium. The University
Girls' Glee club will furnish music
for the service.
Seniors and sophomore girls will
practice basketball at 5 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon.

FATHERLESS CHILDREN OF
FRANCE
"Do your Christmas shop-
ping early" is the slogan every-
where. Why not add--"and do
it for France?"
Newberry residence has "ad-
opted" a child for one year, in
addition to buying many cards.
There are other groups plan-
ning to do the same thing.
These Christmas greeting
cards of varying prices are on
sale at Foster's, and remember
when you are buying your cards,
you are not only thinking of
sending a "MerryrChristmas" to
some one, but are helping to
save the life of a little child in
France, whose father died that
you might live.
If some father or mother has
written asking for Christmas
suggestions for you, forget the
j luxury that you have dreamed
of, and say-"a little Fatherless
Child of France." What could
be bought that would compare
to the honor that is yours, if
in some broken French home
your name stands as that of an
American who did not fail? Ten
cents a day brings lift to the
child and joy to you.
Buy your cards before they
are all gone.
Additional cards and further
information can be obtained
from
MRS. HENRY DOUGLAS,
1620 Cambridge Road,
Telephone 181.
Come to Oren's if you want a good
Sunday dinner. 1121 S. U.-Adv.

WAHR'S

When you go home
Take with you a

MICHIGAN

THE "Y" INN A T LANE HAL L

CALENDAR

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ONLY 50c

EAT YOUR SUNDAY DINNER AT THE "Y"-12:15-1:45
Good Food-Balanced Meals-Attractive Dining Room
OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN
Will close Firday, Dec. 20th, after dinner and be open for
Sunday dinner, January ith

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

BUY YOUR

Final try-outs for the
Girls' Glee club will be
o'clock Monday afternoon.

freshman
held at 4

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

~mmATvinwmmaw

"Discharged" is a word which can"
scarcely have unpleasant associations
for the S. A. T. C. man any more no
matter how many employers he gets
acquainted with in future.
In 1914 secret agents of Germany
were keeping tab on Wilson. The late
Imp. Germ. Gov. hadn't realized that
with T. R. et al., hard at work this
was quite unnecessary.
Your Christmas will be merrier if
you don't forget to interview the bank
anent those bond payments before you
[go home.

Do you know where you get the best
lie a la mode in town? At Oren's,
1121 S. U.-Adv.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv
U A

I-

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

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k.

I

XMAS PARTY
FIRST HA PTIST.' ('IURCH

We Suggest
I Practical Christmas Gifts

TI'hursday evening 7:30 o'clock
Come and bring your friends
Santa Claus will be there with
your present

TRAVELING BAGS

WALKING STICKS

COLLAR BAGS
SUIT CASES,

i

"1

SILK HOSIERY
SILK SHIRTS
SILK HDKFS.

UMBRELLAS
NECKWEAR
MUFFLERS
PAJAMAS
GLOVES

|111

LINEN HDKFS.

CLOTHING

WILL YOUR COLLEGE EDUCATION END WITH THE DEMOBILI-
ZATION OF THE S. A. T. C.

BATH ROBES

I

WADHAMS. & CO.
State street Store

I

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

IT SHOULD NOT
IT NEED NOT

I

I

i

The Company, which yearly opens the doors of the colleges to
thousands -of men, is making a special effort to assist the men in the
S. A. T. C. who now, through lack of funds may be compelled to leave
college.
Do not leave college until you have had an interview with Mr.
Peter Mihelich of tlhe Law Department. Mr. Mihelich will meet all men
interested in continuing their college education, in the lobby of the
Michigan Union on Sunday, December 15th from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 pan.

*Why are you
so insistant?

10

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1

WE DO YOUR WORK WITH SPECIAL CARE

e

BEGCAUSE

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1f..o " ,c

Hamilton Business
Statea j-t
Saeand William St s.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:io a.
n., and hourly to 9:ro p. m.
Jackson Limited andtExpress Cars- :48
a. mn., and every hour to 9:48 p. mn. (
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:os p. M., 10:50 p. sn.
To Ypsilanti only, Ii:45' p. m-., 12:20 a. 1n.,
i:1o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m., to
12:20 a. M.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ..........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORRILL
Typewriters g ot-
Typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Arcade Phone 171S
First Floor

Besimers' Beefsteak Dinners

o p - . . - 4
I3r n n

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comf

Cleani 4

are so hard to equal

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sst

3Com e of Gner l

FREDDIE BESIMERS

CLEANING
209 5. 4th AVE.

PRESSING

1
1

REPAIRING
PHONE 2508

113 W. Huron St.

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P.

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