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December 15, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-15

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E WEATHERr
R AND COOLER
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

.....

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,A0. 15 .

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15. 191R

Pnmn muM010'

rLLJ.~jj1~ I I1L1.i~JJ~i ~,fliIN
I I

JEMOBILIZATION OF
IIAIT.C COMPLETE,
CON 17 STILL HERE
FFICERS REMAIN, AWAITING
FURTHER ORDERS FROM WAR
DEPARTMENT
NGINEERS WILL STAY
iWHEN COMPANY GOES

Last of Fraternity HousesUsed
S. A. T. C. as Barracks
Vacated

by

MICHIGAN TO GET
EDUCATION BUREAU
Michigan is tosbe one of the dozen
large universities of the country to
be honored with a sub-bureau of ed-
ucation. The bureau appoints col-
laborators onsrecommendation and
approves all research work. The pur-
pose of the government in establish-
ing these sub-bureaus is to stimu-
late work along educational lines just
as agriculture is stimulated by exper-
iment stations.
"The sub-bureau will be of great
practical value, not only to the Uni-
versity, but to educational enterpris-
es in general," said Prof. A. S. Whit-
ney. "The bureau here will be sup-
plied with stationery, literature, and
questionnaires and will be granted
the franking privilege. In this way
the distribution of literature for illit-
eracy campaigns and other education-
al work will be greatly facilitated."
The collaborators appointed are to
receive only a nominal salary. By
means of these stations, it is hoped,
a co-operative relationship will be4
established with the bureau of edu-
cation at Washington.
RUSSIAN PIANIST GIVES
PROGRAM OF NOVELTYPE
TECHNIQUE CHARACTERIZES HIS
PLAYING; REPRESENTS
NEW ORDER,

Demobilization of the S. A. T. C.
was completed yesterday when Com-
panies 15 and 16 were disbanded. With
the discharge of the men in these
companies the post here now consists
of only Company 17 and the head-
quarters and medical units.
This leaves only 129 men stationed
here, 112 of whom are in Company
17,' most of which will probably be
sent to Camp Custer when this post
is discontinued. Besides the enlisted
men there are the 51 officers who
have been in charge of the unit. They
have all been given physical examina-
tions and those who will leave the
army are ready for discharge. Those
who will remain in service are await-
ing further orders. It is expected at
headquarters that the order to dis-
charge those who wish it will arrive
within a week or 10 days.
The men formerly members of the
engineers reserve corps, placed in.
Company ,17 because they have not
been assigned serial numbers by the
war department, will not go to Camp
Custer with the rest of the company
but will be allowed to remain in the
UTniversity.
The last of the fraternity houses
aed. by the S. A. T. C. as barracks
were vacated yesterday. The houses
left vacant yesterday were: the Aca-
cia, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Theta
Phi, and Psi Upsilon, The S. A. T. C.
men left the houses in as good order
In way of cleanliness as could be ex-
pected and the University workmen
will begin to repair them immedi-
diately,

NO WOBMEN TO BE
IN UNION OUPERA
Sufficient Male Talent on Hand;
Wo/k to Start Next
Month
NO MATERIAL AND DATES
YET GIVEN FOR PRODUCTION
Only men students will take part
in the 1919 Union opera, which was
made a certainty yesterday by vote
of the directors of the Union upon
recommendation of Mimes.
"Although the directors are grate-
ful to the women of the campus for
their assistance rendered last year,
it was decided that there is sufficient
male talent on the campus now and
women will not be asked to take
part," said Donald M. Springer, '19E,
president of the Union.
No Material Offered
No book, lyrics, or music have yet
been turned in, but there will be a
call for such- material within a
week. A book was accepted last
spring but the composer did not re-
turn to school this fall and the book
was never finished.
Definite Dates Not Made
Committee's will be appointed, and
work toward launching the produc-
tion will be started immediately aft-
er the Christmas holidays. Try-outs
for the cast and chorus will be call-
ed for and rehearsals will begin as
soon as a book is accepted. The
opera is to be produced in the latter
part of March, though the definite
dates were not decided upon.
The securing of a director for the
opera was considered but no one was
appointed. This will be done at the
next meeting of the board.r

EVERYONE TO TAKE
PART IN CONCERT
The regular twilight recital to be
given at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
Hill auditorium under the auspices of
the University School of Music in co-
operation with the War Camp Commu-
nty service, will be quite unusual in
that it will consist for the most part
of community singing. During the
past few months much of this kind of
music has been provided for the sold-
iers and it is now planned to provide
like programs from time to time for
the public. James Hamilton, of the
vocal faculty of the School of Music,
will add to the familiar hymns, and
patriotic songs which will be sung by
the audience, by singing a group of
"Negro Spirituals" which have been
arranged for solo voice by Burleigh.
The general public is cordially in-
vited to the concert, for which no ad-
mission will be charged, but parents
are requested to refrain from bring-
ing small children.
The program is as follows:
"America," "Onward Christian Sold-
iers," "Come All Ye Faithful," "There's
a Long, Long Trail," "Carry Me Back
to Old Virginny," "Keep the Home
Fires Burning," "Negro Spirituals,"
"Sinner, Please Don't Let This Har-
ves' Pass," "Nobody Knows the Trou-
ble I've Seen," "My Way's Cloudy,"
"Prayer of Thanksgiving"-Old Neth-
erland folk song, "Old Black Joe,"
"Battle Hymn of the Republic," "God
of Our Fathers," "O God, Our Help
in Ages Past," "Star-Spangled Ban-
ner."
Accompaniments will .be furnished
by Dorothy Wines and Byrton Gar-
linhouse, '17E, and by Fischer's or-
chestra.}

It is estimated that about 600 stu-
dents attended the initial all-cam.
pus mixer of the year, which was
held yesterday afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium. There were men, girls,
laws, engineers, fat, slim, long, and
short - a true all-campus affair.
Dance, music, and partners' feet made
the time pass all too quickly, and oc-
casionally the music stopped to allow
the dust to settle.
About 500 tickets were sold and over
$100 was cleared. Ice cream cones
helped rejuvenate the tired ones. The
money will go to the general fund of
the Women's league under whose di-
rection the affair was given. The idea
of a mixer was well received from the
start, and it is hoped that this will
not be the last one.

AllCampus lixer
Attended By 6oo

PARIS WELCOMES PRESIDENT WILSON'
WITH MONSTROUS CELEBRATION TO
SHOW LOYALTY OF FRENCH PEOPLI

-S
-
,

PRESIDENT POINCARE AND OTHER
NOTABLES GREET PEACE.
COMMISSION
LEAGUE OF NATIONS IS
NECESSARY--U.S. HEAL
Newspapers Land Arrival of Ameri
cans; Greatest Event Since Ene
of Hostilities

(By Associated Press)

'RED CROSS ORGAIZES
FOR ROLLCALL DRIVE
CAMPAIGN STARTS DECEMBER 18;
ALL STUDENTS WILL BE
SOLICITED

Ann Arbor's first all-Russian con-
cert was received with interest by the
large audience which heard Serge
Prokofieff, at Hill auditorium last
night. The Russian pianist and com-
poser made his first appearance here
with a program entirely of his own
composition with the exception of two
numbers. Genius and remarkable
technique characterized his perform-
ance, but the unfamiliarity of this
type of muic puzzled rather than
pleased most of his hearers. Still
there is no doubt that the artist has
genius and remarkable technique.
Occasional flashes of fire brought
applause and the preludes of Serge
Rachmaninoff made a considerable
impression. Prokofieff's own compo-
sitions lack the expected Russian
strain found in Tchaikowsky and
represent a new order of Russian
music. The final number, "Sugges-
tion diabolique," was probably the
most popular of the entire program.

Ol' Santa Here;
Where's Weather?

BOARD IN CONTROL
ELECTS OFFICERS
At a meeting of the Board in Con-
trol of student publications held yes-
terday, Prof. Fred N. Scott, of the
rhetoriq department, was re-elected
chairman, which he has been since
its ipstitution. Donald M. Springer,
0E, the only student member of the
board, was elected secretary.
A report explaining the.new arrange-
x 1ent in regard to publications made
necessary by the S. A. T. C. and stu-
dents enlisting in other branches of
gervice- was read by Prof. . R. Sun-
derland, of the' law school and treas-
urerpianager of the board. The
editors and business managers of
nearly all the publications appointed
for this ear failed to return to school
or joined the S, A. T. C. This neces-
sitated making new appointments, and,
in the case of The Daily and the Gar-
goyle, securing editors who are not
students in the University.
The two men who were elected to
the board with Springer last May, en-
listed during the summer. The places
left vacant by these men will proba-
bly not be filled as it is hard to cre-
gte enough interest in a single elec-
tion such as this would be to get a
representative vote, according to Pro-
fessor Sunderland.
The Student Directory, which was
ready to go to press when the order
for demobilization of the S. A. T. C.
arrived, has postponed publication
until January. It will be necesgry
to gather the names and new address-
es of the men who remain in school.
There will be no difficulty in gather-
ing this data after the men have reg-
istered.

HOLIDAY GARGOYLE
PLAYS UP FACULTY
Yesterday saw the Gargoyle with us
again with all the Santa Claus stuff
and ex-war dope. In spite of the re-
cent and long-continued rain, the red
and snowy cover by Margaret Jewell,
'20, gave out some real Christmas pep.
This issue abounded in subtle and
clever irony on subjects and persons
much in the campus limelight. Snap-
py cuts on the newly released fight-
ers who have been among our midst
and some of the notorious characters
Michigan has produced were scatter-
ed through the pamphlet.
A humorous and very, very, inti-
mate biography of a well-known dean
was one of the features and exposed
many characteristics that were not
given to the public ear before.
With one of the best issues yet, the
Gargoyle met with enthusiasm yester-
day and today the jokes and jibes are
being quoted by all.
CIVILIAN STUDENTS' SECOND
ENROLLMENT NEAR COMPLETION
All but a few of the civilian men
students in the literary and engineer-
ing colleges have completed their
re-enrollment, according to the office
reports. In the literary college about
100 men recently discharged from the
S. A. T. C. have, thus far, made their
s(-ond enrollment. This number is
expected to increase rapidly during
the ir i part of next week.
In urder that those civilian stu-
.dents who have not yet re-enrolled
might not have a misunderstanding
as to what i required of them, it is
repeated that they will have to re-
register the same as do the men in
the military organizatiuns here. The
latter, however, are required to bring
their papers showing that they have
been discharged.

MICHIGAN TO HAVE
MOTOR LABORATORY
Col. Walter Fishleigh requested of
the Regents of the University last
Friday that a certain appropriation
be made for a laboratory and equip-
ment for research work in automobile
engineering, and his request was fav-
orably received.
Colonel Fishleigh, who has been in
charge of all the automobiles and mo-
tor trucks used bythe United States
in this war, expects his discharge
soon. The faculty have known for
some time that Colonel Fishleigh has
long wished to devote himself to sci-
eritific research. The regents have
promised him a large appropriation
for an up-to-date automobile labora-
tory equipment for his work.
It is expected that Colonel Fish-
leigh will be able to take up his du-
ties at the beginning of the next
semester.
SERBIAN REGENT WOULD FORM
JUGO-SLAY UNITED STATES
Brussels (Havas agency), Dec. 14.
-Crown Prince Alexander, regent of
Serbia, is engaged in the formation
of a government representing all po-
litical groups in the Jugo-Slavic coun-
tries, he declared in an interview at
Belgrade today. Hs program con-
sists of the organization of united
states, on the basis of equality for all
sections.
The prince said that he expected to
see President Wilson during his trip
through France and England. The
public opinion of the people of Serbia
is unanimous in desiring to maintain
the relations formed during the war.
BEG YOUR PARDON!
The resignation of Mr. Linton A.
Wood, of the engineering department,
and not N. A. Wood, as was announc-
ed in yesterday's Daily, was acceptedE
by the Board of Regents at their last
meeting.

Again Santa Claus mysteriously ap-
pears in the store windows, and the
small boy wriggles contemplatively
before the display of trains, autos,
dynamos, wagons, and marbles that
appear too far away behind the glass.
The butcher and the baker are in-
venting goodies undreamed of, and
the candle-stick maker is coming in-
to his own again. For mother and
sister, this year, will have a candle
in the window to light the lonely
traveler on the way, with the hidden
hope that their boys over there may
follow its feeble gleams, and find
their way home on Christmas eve.
The professors also know the sea-
son is approachingsand plan on giv-
ing all their presents the Wednesday
before vacation, quite overwhelming
the students by their generosity.
Christmas this year means more to
the S. A. T. C. men than just ordinary
Christmas. It means the date of his
release from "active" military duty,
when he can follow his own desires
once more. The best present of them
all for him, will be his discharge pa-
pers.
Yea, verily, everybody knows Christ-
mas is coming, except the weather
man.
NEW SERIES OF WAR SAVINGS
STAMPS TO BE ISSUED SOON
A new series of war savings stamps
will be issued at the beginning of the
year. This series will mature one year
later than those which have been sold
during the past year, which will be
payable in 1922. Thrift stamps will
purchase these "baby" bonds in just
the same way that they have in the
past.
War savings stamps may be re-
deemed at any time by notifying the
postoffice department ten days in ad-
vance, according to Postmaster H. J.
Abbott. But the money raised by the
sale of W. S. S. is needed by the gov-
ernment, and if it is taken back be
fore the stamps mature, the necessary
money will have to be raised by taxes.

About 200 people will be employed
in the canvass for Red Cross mem-
berships in Ann Arbor which will be-
gin Wednesday, Dec. 18. Charles F.
Kyer, as chairman of the Red Cross
Christmas roll call committee, will
direct the work, and will be assisted
by the following captains:
First ward, Charles Hutzel; second,
Albert Staebler; third, Clarence
Shankland; fourth, David Rinsey;
fifth, George Spathelf; sixth, George
Vandewalker; seventh, E. T. Cope;
factories, George Fischer.
Drive Lasts Three Days
The drive, which is for member-
ships only, will be of three days' dura-
tion. Solicitations will be made of
all students, homes, business places,
and factories. The work of solicit-
ing in the various wards will be un-
der the supervision of the ward cap-
tains.tThe captains will divide their
respective wards into districts, each
district to have two workers.
The memberships in the Red Cross
are of six classes: annual, $1; maga-
zine, $2; contributing, $5; sustaining,
$10; life, $50, and patron, $100.
Membership for One Year
Only memberships' accepted after
Sept. 1, 1918, will be considered as
1919 memberships and counted as
part of the chaiter's Red Cross
Christmas roll call enrollment. Names
must be reported on this basis daily
to the ward captains. Children will
not be solicited, but will join through
the regular junior auxiliaries.
Any person who takes out a sub-
scription in the Christmas drive be-
comes a member of the Red Cross for
a year. Many people hold member-
ships which extend into 1919, but
they will be asked to waive the un-
expired portion and take out a roll
call one.
PHI SIGMA TO ADD
9 NEW MEMBERS
The fall initiation banquet of the
Michigan chapter of Phi Sigma na-
tional honorary biological society will
be held Monday evening at Lane hall.
The following men will be initiated
at this time:
Dr. J. H. Ehlers, Prof. G. R. La-
Rue, Dr. L. H. Newburgh, Dr. A. J.
Will, F. R. Allen, '21M, W. Bowen,
'19L, J. C. Ludmick, '22M, S. J. Ship-
man, '19M, and C. N. Weller, '20M.
Major Field Spends .Week-End Here1
Major Peter Field, formerly profes-1
sor of mathematics in the engineer-
ing department, is visiting in Ann Ar-
bor over the week-end. Major FieldI
entered the coast artillery service of
the United States army when the war
broke out and is now stationed at they
proving' ground school. He expects'
to receive his discharge the latter part1
of January.I

Paris, Dec. 14.-This is a greater
night in Paris than even on the night
of the signing of the armistice. The
city is ablaze. The boulevards are
thronged with dancers and singers.
The palaces have been turned into
great dancing pavilions and "Ameri-
que" is the prevailing wprd here to-
night.
President and Mrs. Wilson made
their entry into Paris this morning,
greeted by the entire population of
the city and the surrounding country
as well. They were greeted person-
ally by President Poincare and other
prominent leaders of the republic.
Wilson Stands for New Ideals
Entire France has been stirred by
the arrival of the President of the
United States as by no other person-
age. Everywhere he was greeted as
a representative of the new ideals now
dawning upon Europe. In the eyes
of the crowds, say newspaper re-
ports in the city, President Wilson
represents two forces - the force
which won the war, and the force
which will make permanent peace.
Soldiers Push Back Crowd
The French army lined the streets
of the city. Fresh from the battle-
fields, it occupied the post of honor
and, served as guards. Gently but
firmly the soldiers kept order among
the enormous crowd which ever press-
ed forward to see the guest of France.
In two speeches made here today,
President Wilson reaffirmed that the
making of peace and the creation of'
a league of nations must be accom-
plished as one single objective. Re-
sponding to the welcome of Presi-
dentPoincare at luncheon in his hon-
or, President Wilson declared that
the winning of the war was not
enough alone. He said that the peo-
ple of the United Stateshad entered
it with the object of making a perm-
anent peace.
League of Nations Necessary
Responding to the greeting of the
Socialists, he reiterated his state-
ments that the war had been a peo-
ples' war and that the defeat of the
military autocracy was not sufficient
to the fulfilling of the object. He
again decla'ed that the co-operation
of the nations for the security of the
peace to be made was necessary.
To Visit England on Way Home
(By Associated Press)
London, Dec. 14.--President Wilson
has accepted an invitation from Kig
George to visit England, and it is
expected that he wll stop here on his
way home. The British officials are
awaiting the arrival of Ambassador
Davis, before making any arrange-
ments for the entertainment of the
president.
NAVY RULES PAVE
WAY TO SUCCESS
"Follow what we have tried to
teach you here in the navy and you
will be successful in after life," said
Lieut. Allen L. Porter, navy medical
officer, at the last inspection yester-
day of Co. C, Barracks 28. "There
are five precepts which you have been
taught here that will insure success
anywhere," he said. "Keep your shoes
shined; keep your trousers pressed;
keep your teeth brushed; keep your
hair brushed; and above all keep a
stiff upper lip. Follow these rules
and no one need ever know how much
money you have in your pockets."
Lieutenant Porter thanked the men
for their co-4peraton and compli-
mented them on the neatness of their
barracks. He said that he was great.
ly pleased with the appearance and
progress of the entire naval unit.

M. R. lTing, '20, to Speak on America
M. A. Ting, '20, will speak on
"America, as Seen Through the Eyes
of a Chinese Student," at the meeting
of the Wesleyan Guild at 6:30 o'clock
this evening at the First M. E. church.
Miss Ting has studied in this coun-
try for several years and has an im-
portant message to give. This meet-
ing is for the students of the Uni-
versity and the young people of Ann

1
;1

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
14:30-Theme: "COURAGE AND VICTORY"
Noon-Professor Raukin speaks to students
6:30-Yipg :People's Evening Service
Morning Service closes in time for men of the S. A. T. C. and
\val Unit to go to dinner

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