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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i41 4'.s

FRII

rRI

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
in rgthe university year by the Board in
attr ol of Student Publications.
EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is .exclusiv$y entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
tces credited to Lt 6r not otnerwise credited
this paper and also the local news pub-
hed herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter.
Subcriptions by carrierror mail $3.50.
Offies: 'Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 244-
Communications not to exceed Soo words,
aigned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
ain print, but as an evidence of faith, and
tices of events will be published in The
lily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
usideration. No manuscript will be re-
ned unless the writer incloses postage.
Tho Daily does not necessarily endorse the
itiments expressed in the communications.
dred C. Mighell.....Managing Editor
rold Makinson.........lBusiness manager
aries R. Osius, Jr.........City Ecior
rguerite Clark.........Night 1diwr
aes C. J. Martin.......Telegraph Editos
eth-A. Bernstein ..........port Editor
onceut H. Riorden.....Military Editor
a.Guernsey..........Womens Editor
rk K{. Ehlbert........... Associate Editor
len « .Davis............Literary,,ditor
Grand A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
Ines L. Abele... .,.Publication Manager
*ald M. Major. ......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
vid Landis Paul G. Weber
race W. Porter Philip Ringer
th Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
rgare Christie Herman Lustfield
se Irlis Bowen Schumacher
puzel Henry O'Brien
rie rzier Renaud Sherwood
iry D. Lane ~ Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFF
rk B. Covell Robert E. McKean
ward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
a R. Welsh Wm. A. Letzinger
a
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 191i.
Issue Editor-Ruth Dailey
KNOW YOUR DUTY
Pvery man, soldier, sailor, or stu-
lt; has again to face a new problem,
problem as big and of as much im-
rtance as that which came before
n when we entered the war. He de-
ed then whether his duty lay at
me or at the -front. Now he must
elde whether his Vduty is to educate
mself or return to the plow or shop!
ere is but one true answer to this
)blem. Stay at the: University.
Leave college now, and you are a
serter. Your country needs you, not
a soldier or sailor, but as a man
ability and education, ready to cope
th the questions of reconstruction
ich are all-embracing. Reconstrue-
u now is as important as was the
ging of war a month ago. And it is
college-trained man who must
d the thousands to ultimate suc-
s. These great problems cannot be
rked out by uneducated men, no
tter how great.is their experience
the business world. The thinker is
man who is needed by the govern-
nt today. . There will be plenty of
nmon laborers available.
nu four years at the University, a
i gains the knowledge and founda-
a that it would take a life-time to
uire in the outside world. Our
Intry is seriously threatened with a
rth of professional men; every In-
stry depends upon them. It is the
;y of every university and every
a in those universities to heed the
1 of the government and supply the
at want The last advice given by
itary officers all over the country
the men who are being dismissed
,i service is, "Go back to college.
as good a man as you were a sold-
and you will scorea bigger vic-
y than that won in France."

rived from years on the campus. The.
freshmen are doing their best, and their
best, in many cases, compares favor-
ably with the work done by the former
leaders.
The upperclassmen will be welcomed
back into all activities, but the frosh will
not be forgotten. They have proven
themselves to be worthy of the name
of Michigan men by giving their best to
Michigan's affairs. They have kept
plugging, even in the face of mnany
disadvantages, and they have succeeded
in keeping University life from declin-
ing altogether. There will still be
plenty of work for them to do. Men
discharged from the army or navy will
be busy making up academic work they'
have missed. They will be in activities
to a certain extent, but the brunt of the
work will fall upon freshmen. The time
for renewed co-operation has arrived,
and all classes will fall in line, senior,
junior, sophomore, and freshman. We
are all for Michigan.
Detroit's conductorettes are organ-
izing a union. Time for the lady
blacksmiths.
Wonder if they'll remember to put
on neckties when they get rid of their
uniforms? .
Many a fair damsel has already be-
gun to plan that J-Hop gown.
Signs of a heavy winter-those flap-
py galoshes are out again.,

"FRESH TO THE FRONT"

SENIOR ENDORSES ACTION
FRESHMEN CLASS IN EN-
FORCING TRADITION

OF

Editor, Michigan Daily:-
As a member of the senior class, I
cannot too heartily endorse the recent
action of the freshmen to enforce the
old tradition of wearing the fresh
pots ,and I believe I voice the atti-
tude of the campus in general. We
have witnessed with dismay the seem-
ing indifference of the freshman class'
In upholding Michigan's customs and
it is high time they came across with
their share of campus spirit. They
have been unusually fortunate this
year in being able to hide their ver-'
dancy under an army hat, or, if a'
civilian student, by ignoring the cus-
tom altogether because there was not,
opportunity for a highly organized
class to enforce it.
From now on, we expect the fresh-
man class to exert themselves doubly
to make up for the time lost, and al-
though we do not encourage them to
make themselves obnoxious even that
would be preferable to a dormant at-
titude. This campus has always stood
for certain traditions, and the fresh-
man class is the first one to perpetu-
ate them from year to year. We trust'
the freshmen will not have to intro-
duce a system of hazing among their
number to make the unobliging mem-
bers wear their caps, but there are
always a few who prefer to furnish
amusement to the sophomores and
public rather than comply with this
time-honored custom. The watering
tank, the North University hydrant,
the egg shampoo, the muddy pavement
of State street is awaiting these slack-
ers.

.I

whether they have taken it because
of slass spirit or as a measure of pre-
paredness, and I am only one of
many who are. watching with inter-
est this class of 1922. Go to it,
frosh. You can show up the whole r
campus if you will, and start the ball
rolling by wearing your pots or toques
until time to throw them in the bas-
ket for the Belgian babies.
A SENIOR
All manuscripts for the Junior
Girl's play must be submitted before
Friday, Dec. 13, to Laura Peacock, '20,
chairman.
Tryouts for the Freshman Girls'
Glee club will be held at 4 o'clock
Monday afternoon in Miss Nora Hunt's
studio in the school of Music.
The Women's league circus will be
held from 3 to 6 o'clock this afternoon
In Barbour gymnasium.
SECRETARY BAKER HINTS OF
UNIVERSAL MILITARY TRAINING

FOR CHRISTMAS

Personal
Greeting
Cards

ORDER THEM NOW

Ask to see the latest and correct styles-
Christmas Engraving a Specialty at

AHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

_A

Your

every Banking need

fulfilled at the

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are report-
ed by the commanding general of the
American Expeditionary Forces: Kill-
ed in action, 205; died of wounds, 41;
died of accident and other causes, 5;
died of airplane accident, 3; died of
disease, 186; wounded severely, 78;
wounded, degree undetermined, 89;
wounded slightly, 146; missing in ac-.
tion, 117. Total, 870.
Private Alfred Knapp of 612 Felch
street, Ann Arbor, was wounded
slightly.

Washington, Dec. 5.-A hint of adop-
tion of universal training, at least until
world peace is secured, is contained in
Secretary of War Baker's annual report,
although definite recommendations for
Alnerica's future military plans were
omitted. Secretary Baker stated that
the military needs of America cannot
be fixed accurately until the coming
peace conference shall have established
international relations for the world.
Today's report states that the war de
partment's recent recommendation to
congress for ' appropriations sufficient
to maintain a regular standing army of
500,000 men is just a temporary plan.
Allen O. Beach, ex-'19E, now second
lieutenant, is attached to the staff of
the 142nd field artillery in France. '
Beach entered an officers' - training
school at Camp Custer last year with
several other Michigan men.

U

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

I am not -cynical to the point of be-
lieving the freshmen take this step
.now in order to avoid the usual haz-
ing which the sophomores have been-
denied thus far, but will pursue in'
earnest when the University returns
to normal., It remains to be seen

- AT .

SHEEHAKS
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

I

r

Buy

:
"

Your.

:

Clothes

:0

In

:

Ann

:0

Arbor

Help Win The War
BY PREPARING fOR CIViL SERVICE
OR BUSINESS

You'd like to be sure that what
you buy is exactly right; and
that it will continue to satisfy
&: you. That's our idea of selling;
to have things right, and guar-
l- antee satisfaction. We can al-
ways refund money cheerfully.
Varsity Suits ' Varsity Overcoats

AT

Hamilton Busess
College
State and William Sta.

.

j.

THE ANSWER
Billiards and Bowling
HUSTON SROS.
w t-7 -- Treat You Right"

with Military
Panel Back

For University Men
These models have ultra style
in every line; there's real indi-
viduality in them; welt seam
waists; developed chests; oval
hips; high shoulders; the smart
military lines of a young man s
figure.
The fashionable colors; metal
shades, foliage browns, dark
greens, blues, grays, new ideas
in stripes and over plaids.
Suits, Overcoats, Ulsters for University men
and Faculty men. There are no better
values to be had.
$20, $25, $28, $30, $35, $38

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jaekson
(October 2", 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-y:ro a.
m., and hourly to 9:io p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (1x.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :oe a. m., and
every two hours to q: o p. in., e:3 6'p. in.
To Ypsilanti only, xIt '4p.0iM., 1 s :,e a. in.,
r :e a. m., and to Saline, ehAngeat Ypsilanti.
SLocal -'Cars West Bound-7y:48 a. MR-, to
12:20 a. M.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
TheoAnn Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $66&0,000.00
Resource ........$4000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

ALL FOR MICHIGAN
The decision of the committee on elig-
ibility to allow freshmen to continue
work in activities the remainder of the
semester is worthy of the University
whose committee so acted. It is vital
to all activities on the campus that
freshmen be allowed to continue the
work they have begun, and it should not
be the policy of anyone to forget then
after. the upperclassmen return to active
University life. True, the older men are
probably better fitted to carry on the
work, but that capability has? been de-

nshrity raut (910*5

J. F. WUERTH CLOTHING STORE
BETWEEN THE THEATRES

._ .._
.- .__

..,. ._

1 } ...

._. . _
_
..._.___

... .

...DANCES

AT

. ..

Armory

Every

Friday

ight

\ .,

"Ike" Fisher Personally in Charge of Orchestra.

Dancing at 8 o'clock

..

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