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December 06, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-06

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THE WEATI
SNOW AND COY
TODAY

LDER

Ar

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAYi AND NIGHT WIRE
SERTICE

I

.........

XXIX No. 57.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1918.

DICHRGE PPR
FAIL TO9ARRIVE
fOM O
DOCTORS VACCINATE STUDENTS
FOR TYPHOID AND
SMALLPOX
PHYSICIANS EXAMINE
500 SOLDIERS EACH D AY
Final Payroll Contains Names of All
Enlisted Here; to Receive Fare
to Induction Point
Nearly 300 men from section B
were given their physical examina-
tions yesterday, prior to theirdis-
charge from the service. Most of these
men were of company 2. None of the
men have as yet reecived their dis-
charge as there has been a delay in
the shipment of the necessary papers.
A messenger was sent to Camp Cus-
ter to find out the cause of the de-
l;, and if possible will bring back
the papers so that the men who have
been examined can be discharged Im-
im mediately.
The men in addition to being ex-
amined are being vaccinated for both
typhoid and smallpox. It was stated
at medical headquarters that all the
men of section A will also receive the
double vaccination, before being re-
leased. This work could not be car-
ried out last fall when the S. A. T.
C. was inaugurated because of the in-
fluenza epidemic, and to prevent any
spread of disease the precautions are
now to be taken.
Considering that the system of ex-
amining the men has not yet been
completed, the number being exam-
ined at the present time is beyond
any expectations. It was believed that
only from 250 to 300 men could be
gassed in a day-,but. thiie number-has
been reached and now the figuge set
by the authorities at headquarters is
more than 500 per day. At this rate
it will take little more, than a week
to demobilize the remainder of the
Michigan unit, if the needed papers
are receiv.ed from Camp Custer.
The work is being pushed as rapid-
ly as possible. Bth the clerical and
examining staff are to continue their
work through Sunday. Passes will be
issued as usual to all section B men
this week end, so it is expected that
they will not be discharged by that
time.
The final payroll will include the
names of all enlisted men here, but
the quartermaster's department has
received no word concerning giving
the men a bonus of a month's pay.
Members of section B, who were
inducted in other towns will e given
railroad fare to the point of their in-
duction. The men of section A, near-
ly all of whom were inducted here,
will be given a reduction in fare from
here to their homes, according to the
quartermaster's department, but the
exact arrangements are not yet
known.
DEMOBILIZATION WILL NOT
AFFECT CASE OR RESERVE
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland.-No great changes will
be made in the enrollment at West-
ern Reserve university or at the
Case school of applied science after
thedemobilization of the military

units there. President Charles F.
Thwing of Western Reserve said that
90 per cent of the 600 enrolled will
stay at the college. President Charles
S. Howe of Case estimated that be-
tween 500 and 600 of the 630 in the S.
A. T. C. will continue in attendance.
It is planned to have every member
of the students' army training corps
discharged into civil life before the
beginning of the Christmas holidays.

MICHIGAN OPERA
PLANNED BY MIMES
Should the plans of the Mimes of
the Michigan Union be carried to per-
fection, the University will see anoth-
er Michigan Union opera before the
school year is over.
The Mimes met yesterday to discuss
the project and perfected plans for a
production. Announcement of just
what they had decided upon was not
made, since their action must meet
with the approval of the committee on
student activities before it can be
:nade public.
It is customary for the production
to be the work of the students of the
University exclusively. The play, mus-
ic and action is written and carried
out by students. Plenty of material is
in the hands of the Mimes, it is said,
and everything is in readiness, await-
ing the approval of the committee.
WOMEN LE .UE CIRCUS
TB, BE THIS AFTERNOON

"LABOR SITUTION NOT
SElIU SU" SAYS CRANE

TEN LOSE LIVES IN
DETONATOR LAST

FINANCIAL CRISIS
DUE TO INFLUENCE

COMING I FIRE

DESTROYS ONE

UNIT OF1

OF

COUNTRY'S TAXES

MANY SPECIAL ACTS
PUT ON BY VARIOUS
SOCIETIES

WILL BE
CAMPUS

Mysteries, brass bands, fortune tell-
ing and almost acrobats, are in final
readiness for the mammoth replica of
what made Barnum and Bailey fam-
ous, to be produced by the Women's
league, in Barbour gymnasium, this
afternoon.
The parade will start at 3 o'clock
and all who are planning to march
are urged to be there at that hour.
Included in the parade will be ani-
mals from all over the world. Then
will come the big show in the main
tent comprising the following acts:
The Mysterious Invention, "Stropic
Schopic Slip-meter," to be displayed
by the society of Wyern, the sketch,
"Maggie and Her Lover, Joe," pre-
sented by.Kappa-Kappa Gamma, the
world renowned comedians from Kap-
pa Alpha Theta, Mammoth features of
Martha Cook and Newberry and other
acts given by Alpha Chi Omega, Col-
legiate Sorosis and Chi Omega.
Besides these main acts there will
be several side shows and other at-
tractions.
Therewill be a huge band and a
three piece orchestra for dancing.
Chances will be sold on a beautiful
Christmas present, and "Mother's
home-made jam' 'of a quality delici-
ous, will be on the bargain 'counter.
The proceeds of the circus will go
to pay off the debt on the Alumnae.
house, a most worthy institution, so
come one, come all, that is, all wom-
en. Only 10 cents, one dime! '
SOLDIERS TO COME BACK IN
WARSHIPS RETURN BY XMAS
Paris, Dec. 5. - A large party of
American soldiers and sailors will
return in the 10 American dread-
naughts, which will escort President
Wilson on his trip abroad. The trip
is so planned that the boys may be
expected home by Christmas time.
Brest, the port where they will em-
bark, is already crowded by men
awaiting the homeward trip. The
fleet will leave the European side
about December 15.
FRATERNITY HOUSES TO HAVE
OVERHAULING DURING HOLIDAYS
Work of repairing the damaged
parts, taking out extra plumbing, and
renovating the fraternity -houses
which have been used by the S. A. T.
C. as barracks, will be carried on by
the University buildings and grounds
department. This is according to a
statement by E. C. Pardon, superin-
tendent of the buildings and grounds
department. Just as soon as a build-
ing is vacated, the men will be sent
to commence work upon it.

It is doubtful whether this country
stands in great danger of an indus-
trial uprising because of the inevit-
able change in conditions due to the
close of the war, according to Prof.
Robert T. Crane of the political sci-
ence department yesterday. I
Wages will go down because of the
great supply of labor there will be on
the market, due to the returned sold-
iers and the closing down of so many-
war industries which employed large
bodies of men at high prices. There
is nothing to be feared from the sold-
ier. The average laboring man is
paid highly enough in this country and
realizes through being educaed by his
labor union, that to rebel would be to
tear down the whole structure and
bring ruin upon himself.
Bolshevist Element Dangerous
The real danger lies with the I. W.
W. who compose the Bolshevist ele-
ment in this country. T government
has been able to suppress the move-
ments of the I. W. 4V. during war-
time but with the coming of peace
it will be impossible to enforce martial
regulations. Because so many com-
munities and the country as a whole
realize the danger of the new situa-
tion, the attempt will be made to find
occupation for all men. It is plan-
ned in some towns to have the extra
supply of labor used to build roads, or
similar work, until the work of read-
justment has become well started.
Financial Crisis Averted
It is expected that the danger of a
financial crisis, due to arrive after
any war, has been greatly lessened
because of the stabilizing influence of
the high taxes the government has
been receiving during the period of
the war, from the mail, railroads, cus-
toms, etc. There was no doubt when
we went into the war as to whether or
not we would win. It was a fact, which
kept our money standard from too
great an inflation.
Colonel Vaughan
Again Visits City
Col. Victor C. Vaughan of the
surgeon-general's office in Washing-
ton, and dean of the Medical school
in the University, arrived in Ann Ar-
bor today to visit for a few days.
He brought several reels of mov-
ing pictures with him, taken to rep-
resent the growth of tissues and cells.
These will be exhibited at 1 o'clock
this afternoon in the lecture room of
the Natural Science building. It is In-
tended for the medical students, but
the public is also invited to attend.
Health Officials to Check Epidemic
Lansing, Dec. 5.-State health of-
ficers and Governor Sleeper are pre-
pared to take drastic measures, if
necessary, to check the influenza epi-
demic it was announced today. An-
other closing order to churches, the-
aters, and other public gathering plac-
es will be issued only as an extreme
measure, it was said, but officials

i)U PONT PLANT IN NEW <
JERSEY
Pompton Lakes, N. J., Dec. 5. -
Ten men were killed and 23 injuredI
here today by four explosions which
destroyed the detonator assembling
buildings of the Du Pont cap works,
and shook the country side for miles
around. Fire, which followed the ex-
plosions, was confined to the one unit,
and property loss was said to be
slight.
With the first blast, hundreds of
men, women and children, who had
relatives working at the plant, has-
tened to the scene, but because of
possible danger to them, guards bar-
red them from the gates. As soon as
it was possible the injured were rush-
ed to the company's hospital at Has-
kell. It is feared that four or five of
the injured may die.
Officials of the company said to-
night they believed an employe at
work assembling French fuse detona-
tors, which were filled with fulminate
of mercury, had dropped one of
them. Exploding, this had set off the
stock in the building, which officials
claimed, contained only 25' or 30
pounds of fulminate.
Unusual Issue of
In lander Appears
An editorial by Ex-President Theo-
dore Roosevelt is the most unusual of
a great number of unusual features in
the Christmas number, of the Inlander
on sale at the various newstands and
bookstores throughout the city, this
morning.
Thirty-six pages, comprising the
largest single issue of' the Univer-
sity's literary magazine that has ever
been published, will contain besides
this remarkable editorial, many excel-
lent stories and numerous good poems.
"Alien Strain," a story of 11 pages,
an exceptional length when it is re-
membered that formerly a tale of four
or five pages was unusually long,
deals with the change in spirit of the
German aliens in this country. Its au
thor is Miss Adlaide Adams, a new-
comer to the Inlander's staff of writ-
ers, and she has handled her subject
very well.
A ditty entitled, "Seven Nights in a
Barracks," will be of interest to all
the S. A. T. C. and naval unit men
who have undergone that experience
for seevral seven nights. It was writ-
ten by one of the great brotherhood
of fellow sufferers and will be true
to life.
Three sonnets to Elizabeth Brown-
ing by Lawrence Conrad are an excel-
lent example of poetry, and there are
several other short pbems of excep-
tional quality.
In all, the present number of the
Inlander is the biggest and most un-
usual that has ever appeared.
Sir Cecil to Attend Conference
London, Dec. 5.-Sir Robert Cecil,
former assistant secretary of state
for foreign affairs, has been asked by
the government to take charge of the
British section of the peace confer-
ence which is to deal with the ques-
tion of a league of nations.

NON-PARTISANS ASK
FOR UNITY OF WORLD
(By Associated Press)
St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 5.-A peace,
which would create "a United States
of the world" by consent, and not by
conquest, is favored by the national
non-partisan league, according to its
"fighting program" adopted at the an-
nual convention today.
The program favored a pece end-
ing war by creating world democracy,
not substituting one despotism for an-
other, and a reconstruction program
providing for the employment of all,
reduction of the cost of living, ending
monopolistic extortion, and redeeming
the state and national governments
from autocratic control of monopolies.
The program favored government
ownership of railroads and public util-
ities taken over as a war nyeasure,
government work in such enterprises
as road building, forestry, timber, and
fuelproduction and complete enfran-
chisement of women.'
M'ADOO'S SUCCESSOR
NOT YE1TTRMINED
TWO DIFFERENT PLANS FOR THE,
SUPERVISION OF RAILROADS
PRESENTED
Washington, Dec. 5.-A new direct-
or general of railroads to succeed
William G. McAdoo may not be nam-
ed for two weeks or more, it was said
today.
The resignation of Robert S. Lovett
as director of the railroad adminis-
tration's divisions of capital expendi-
tures announced today and his In-
sistance of going back to his old du-
ties as chairman of the executive com-
mittee of the Union Pacific was con-
sidered as having left Mr. McAdoo
without a candidate immediately at
hand to recommend to President Wil-
son. It was stated authoritatively
that the director general now is look-
ing about for men whom he may ro-
pose, and it is considered probable
that someone utside the railroad ad-
ministration's staff may be chosen.
McAdoo Makes Plans
Mr. McAdoo today conferred with
his advisory staff of the railroad ad-
ministration concerning proposed
plans for supervising railroads when
they are turned back to private man-
agement. Two differing plans are
understood to have developed among
his advisors. One proposal is to have
the railroads merge into regional
groups, with common operating man-
agement to start, and eventually to
develop into common ownership with
the roads themselves selecting their
regional managements in which the
government would be represented.
The other plan put forth is for the
roads to operate individually and pri-
vately, competing for service, but un-
der the supervision of a government
agency to be known perhaps as the
department of transportation headed
by a cabinet member. To this agen-
cy would be left largely the question
of making proper rates, administer-
ing the common use of terminals and
pooling of cars, and to a certain ex-
tent, the routing of freight traffic.
Both plans would propose government
supervision of railroad security is
sues.

PRICE THREE CENTS
U.S. CANCELS WAR
ORDERS: TO SAVE
1 AR EXPiENSES AMOUNT TO NINE
BILLION IN THIS COUN-
TRY
GOVERNMENT EXPENDS
$1,168,000,000 IN FRANCE
Cancellation of Contracts Total 143
Million in Michigan; Save One.
Half of Appropriation
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 5.-Secretary Bak-
er told 'the senate finance committee
today that through contract concella-
tions the war department expects to
save approximately $7,250,000,00 of the
$24,281,000,000 voted by congress for
the army during the war.
Earlier in the day the house ap-
propriation's committee, which is in-
vestigating as to how much of the
war expenditures may be returned to
the treasury, made public a statement
from Mr. Baker showing an estimated
saving of about $12,000,000,000, or
nearly half the total appropriation.
Chairman Shirley, explaining later,
however, that this estimate was made
some time ago and that revised fig-
ures -furnished by the war department
showed a saving of about $7,000,000,-
000.
The secretary's statement to the
house appropriation's committee said
that the disbursements to date in the
United States total $9,150,000,000, and
those in France $1,168,000,000. Mr.
Baker previously had informed the
committee of contract cancellations
aggregating about $2,600,000,000.
Enumerating the cancellations by
states, Mr. Baker said those in Mich-
igan amounted to $143,000,000.
S.A.T.C. Officers
~anquel at "Y"

Officers connected with the S.'A.
T. C. were given a banquet last night
at 7 o'clock at Lane hall by the Y.
M. C. A. The banquet and speeches
were followed by entertainers who
kept the gathering amused for the rest
of the evening.
Major Ralph M. Durkee spoke for
several minutes and commented on
the beneficial work the Y. M. C. A. has
done among the students. Mr. Fran-
cis C. Stifler, camp general Secre-
tary, expressed his thanks for the co-
operation with which the military au-
thorities had met his endeavors He
solicited their help for an ending
with a flourish and informed them
that he had just received a telegram
from Washington to the effect that
the local "Y" would be kept on a war
basis until the end of the year. Mr.
Stifler earnestly desired that these
officers, whose interest had been so
keen, should not allow their enthusi-
asm to wane in peace times.
Mr. Francis Bacon, head of the
War Camp Community Service of Ann
Arbor, arranged the program which,
in addition to moving pictures, in-
cluded a performance in magic and
sleight of hand by Pte. Lester Gester-
feldt of the S. A. T. C., section A, and
a vaudeville presentation by Rex and
Alan Stanchfield.
England to Ask End of Conscription
Dundee, Dec. 5.-The British repre-
sentative at the peace conference will
demand general and absolute aboli-
tion of conscription- throughout Eu-
rope. Winston Spencer Churchill
made this announcement in a speech
here tonight.

point to
that the
spread.

today's reports as showing
epidemic is making rapid
New cases number 1,583.

T OD AY

Y

WOMEN'S LEAGUE CIRCUS
3:30-6:00 p. m.
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
Refreshments, Jazz Band, Dancing, Stunts, Fortunes,
Side Shows
ADMISSION-10 CENTS

Children of Detroit to Sing Carols'
Detroit, Dec. 5.-To those residents
of Detroit who show in the windows
of their homes on Christmas eve the
"Christ Child" welcoming candle, De-
troit's children carolers will sing.
Detroit this year will enjoy the
ages-old custom of singing and hear-
ing sung the beautiful carols of the
Christmas season-carols to be sung
in the streets by boys and girls, men
and women. Scores of Sunday schools
have joined in the effort and rehears-
als have been going on several
months.

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