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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 03, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

L NEWSPAPER AT THE
IRSITY OF MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday
niversity yearibysthe Board in
:udent Publications.

id

OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ociated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news dis-
dited to it or not otnerwise credited
per and also the local news pub-
in.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter.
tions by carrier or mail, ;3.5O.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
ications not to exceed 300 words,
the signature not necessarily to ap-
nt, but as an evidence of faith, and
events will be published in The
he discretion of the Editor, if left
ed to the office.
d tommunications will receive no
on. No manuscript will be re-
ess the writer incloses postage.
ly does not necessarily endorse the
expressed 'in the communications.
. Mighell.......Managing Editor
akinson..........business Manager

feeling and expression and is impreg-
nated with a beautiful sincerity that
measures up to the emotions of all
of us.
"It is too soon to assess them (the
significance of war's events) and we
who stand in the midst of them and
are part of them, are less qualified
than men of another generation will
be to say what they mean or even
what they have been," says President
Wilson. But that is no reason why
President Wilson, and everybody else,
should not meet with all possible wis-
dom and strength present problems.
YEA! YOST!
Fielding H. Yost, the pride of Mich-
igan, has finished one of the most suc-
cessful seasons in the history of the
University. He has taken war-time'
material, with war-time conditions,
and produced what proved to be an
undefeatable football eleven.
His ability, made famous by 18 years
of coaching, will become immortal in
the gridiron world as the result of his
1918 aecomplishment. His sacrifices
to Michigan are respected by the
school, for giving up business and
home life to the interest of the Maize
and Blue, he spends months at the
University, to give it a standing in
the football world.
Some call him an old timer. Some
say his methods are worn out, but
when he can produce an undefeated
eleven which has one of the best
claims in the country for a champion-
ship standing, in spite of handicaps
such as military discipline, freshmen,
and the flu-.
Fielding H. Yost, we take our hats
off to you!

D
Q tom en
The hygiene lecture for freshman
and entering sophomore girls will be
given at 5 o'clock today.
Senior girls will hold basketball
practice at 5 o'clock today.
Sophomore and freshman girls will
practice at 3 o'clock Wednesday;
freshmen at 5 o'clock on Thursday, and
juniors at 5:30 o'clock the same day.
Wyvern will meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight at the home of Dean Myra
B. Jordan, 1215 Hill street. Members
are requested to bring dues.
MICHIGAN OBSERVATORY IS ON
LOOKOUT FOR LITEST COMET
Strange things are happening over
our heads. The latest discovery is in
the form of a comet first seen abeut 10
days ago by Professor Seherr of
Hamburg university. It is located
seven degrees southwest of the bright
star, Aldebaran. Professor Burton,
at the naval observatory in Washing-
ton, was able to see this latest heav-
enly body last Saturday with the aid
of a powerful telescope.
Astronomers at the observatory of
the University of Michigan have been
on the lookout for this first new comet
of the year, but it has been too cloudy
lately to locate it.

FOR CHRISTMAS

UNCLE SAM SAYS:
"Our people will be wise
and patriotic enough not!
to neglect the recreation
necessary to ma i nta in
their efficiency." What do
you say?
See tomorrow's Daily for answer

Personal
Greeting
Cards

ORDER THEM NOW

Usius, Jr.............City
Clark............Night
S artin.........elgraph
Bernstein...........port
Riordeti..........Military
ernsey*...........Women's
ilbert..........Associate
avis ..............Literary

Ed.tor
dir
Editor
Editor
Editor
editor
E ditor

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Defroit Limited and Express Cars-7:1v a
mn., and hourly to g:io p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 P.m. .
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. in., and
every two hours to 9 :05 p. mn., io :5o p. mn
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 12:20 a. in.
1:io a. 1n., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. i., to
12:20 a. M.
O. D. MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved toI
Nickels Arcade Phone 1718
First Floor

WAHR'S

,...+

For the Boys in Camp
For Friends at Home
WX THAT more useful andenduringChrist-
emas gift than a Parker Self-filler?

Ask to see the latest and correct styles-
Christmas Engraving a Specialty at

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

d A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
L. Abele.........rPublication Manager
M. Mlajor.........irculation Manager
ISSUIE EDITIORS
andis EPaul G Weber
W. Porter Philip Ringer
ailey E. D. 'Ilintermann
REPORTE-RS
t Christie Eerman Lustfield
lis Bowen Schumacher
lrpzie Henry O'Brien
rozierRenaud Sherwood
). Lane, Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFF
. Covell Robert E. McKean
Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Welsh Win. A. Leitzinger
ESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1918.
ue Editr-E. D. Flintermiann

i
i ,I

THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
President Wilson has given voice to
plans, foreign and domestic, and
e pillars of tne temple still stan,;
#btless much to the surprise of self-
pointed interpreters of the Presi-
nt's mind. He did not advocate
ite socialism; on the contrary he
id business would be returned to pri-
te management as speedily as pos-
le, and even the railroads would be
lased" from government control if,
d when, some method for returning
am should be proposed that wouldj
t result in the same evil conditions
which the railroads were before the
ernment took them over. That is
that the most bitter opponent of
vernment ownership asks.
rhe President specifically sided with
ye who say that genius of the Am-
can people is in free opportunity
- economic development, unhamper-
by government regulations.
rhere was no fanatical visionary or
cifist plea for disarmament on the
rt of the United States. The President
ged that our three-year naval pro-
am be carried out, a program great-
than that of England, because it
uld be unwise to base our de-
ise plans on a world scheme that
s not been adopted in principle,
ich less 'worked out to practical ac-
unplishment.
)n these points President Wilson
s been much less radical than his
enies hoped and prophesied he
uld be; much less radical than
sy of his admirers hoped and
>ught he would be. As to govern-
bnt control of ocean cables, he act-
on expert advice that unified
re control was for the best. Gov-
nment control will make it impos-
>1e for any special interest to ob-
.n more than its share of the limit-
"service possible over cables.
'It is my duty to play my full part
making good what they (America's
Idiers) offered their life's blood to
tain," says President Wilson, refer-
ag to his determination to go per-
nally to Europe. He says the Al-
4 nations have accepted peace pro-
sals enunciated by him and it is his
ramount duty to be present. The
esident is in a position to know
iether his presence at Paris will
1p to make good those principles for
aich America has sacrificed much,
d if he can aid, be it by ever so lit-
, in obtaining the establishment of
ose principles it certainly is his
ramount duty to go. To talk about
being undignified, or making Amer-
a appear to be trying to force its
>inions on Europe is bosh. Amer-
a entered the war to make the world
fe for democracy; Americans sac-
ficed their blood and treasure to
ing about a lasting peace along just
aes of national self-determination;
ur Allies knew our position when
tey accepted our aid, and a President
ho would hesitate to do everything
t his power to establish our world
rinciples would be recalcitrant and
nWorthy of his position.
The tribute President Wilson paid
> our soldiers and sailors and our
┬░vilian men and women is fine in

The S. A. T. C. man after aimlessly
squandering the extra 15 minutes be-
tween reveille and school formation
can understand the psychology of the
lifer pardoned out after 20, years, who
can't decide how to spend his new-
found liberty.
The date has been set for election
day in Germany. If there is a scram-
ble for offices, the world will have
another preof of Teutonic fool-hard-
iness.
What do you gather from the fact
that Illinois is glad that the football
season is over and that Michigan is
sorry? So do we.
Only two naval tanks in the United
States? What has become of the.old-
fashioned sailor who used to be noted
for capacity?
The fair maid was heard to remark
that a campus de-gobilized wouldn't
be half so attractive.
RALPH M. CARSON TO ADDRESS
ADELPHI AT MEETING TONIGHT
Ralph M. Carson, '17, Varsity de-
bater and holder of a Rhodes Schol-
arship, will give a talk of especial in-
terest to new members and tryouts,
as well as old members, at the meet-
ing of Adelphi at 7 o'clock this even-
ing on the fourth floor of University
hall. The meeting will be one of
the best of the year, and everyone in-
terested in debating or public speak-
ing is invited to attend.
Simon Shetzer, '21,'will lead the
house in parliamentary drill, and the
discussion of the proposed league of
nations will be eontinued.
Women's League to Hold Sale Today
The War Work committee of the
Womens league will hold a pie sale
today at the corner of University and
State streets. The proceeds will go
toward filling comfort bags to be sent
abroad.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

LYNDON

719 N. University

Ann Arbor representative dealer in EASTMAN KODAKS, films
and supplies, and photographer to Michigan Students. We do
THE amateur finishing business in Ann Arbor because we do
the kind that brings them and keeps them here. -: -

Usedin the armies and
-I;II navies of the world.
Your soldier boy will "
find daily use for a Parke: Self-filler. The
Parker is used in the armies and navies of the
world because it's SAFETY-SEALED-no
holes in wall of barrel-ink cannot ooze or leak out to - i Parker Yak
soil hands or clothing, as with the old style "hole in the a T bl
wall" or lever type of pen. ,I for soldles
I u ~se in place
In event of accident to interior mechanism, the Parker of fdn
automatically changes from a self-filler to a non-self-filler ox =cents.
without interruption of service.
Come in and inspect our assortment.
"URAew PARKCR
boeld in P18CC
QUARRY DRUG CO'S PRESCRIPTION STORE
We will continue our clearance sale on all winter
Millinery during December

Established in 1905.

Growing bigger and better every day since.

PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-F1

STEVENS & PERSHING

618 PACKARD

A fine line of hair goods included

in this sale.

F

-.0dold

momm,

We Still Have Plentygf those
Good Kuppenheimer Obercoats
On Hand
A man who buys an obercoat late here
is Not penalized by having to choose from
"p$icked over" stocks.

A

s

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.

I

We keep filling in our lines continually;
halve just reeeed a big shipment of these pop
ivelt-ivaisted ulsterettes and misters.
These coats are style masterpieces. De
describes the the luxuriousness of their taio
both inside and outside. They do not come
better at
$25- $30 - $35 -a4 f- $45
N1 F. ALLEN CO
6"The Kuppenholmer Hops in Ann Arbor
MAIN STREET

Iye
ludar
L~uxe
tiing
any

Yb oygb 98
BoseotEupho

I

S.
I
/

F

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