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December 03, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-03

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THE WEATHIER' l
PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY f i ~
________________________________________________________ I

jIaiI

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMD NIGHT WIRE
SERTICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 54. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1918. PRICE THREE CE

I

PRESIDENT LUDS
YANKEE FIGHTERS
BEFORE CONGRESS
WILSON SAILS FOR ENGLAND TO-
DAY; TO INFORM U. S. BY
WIRELESS
GOVERNMENTS TO ISSUE
PEACE COMMUNICATIONS
Democrats Applaud Speech; G. 0. P.'s
Remain Silent; Proposes to Give
Women Vote
(By the British Wireless Press)
Paris, Dec. 2.-It is reported that
an agreement has been reached by the
Allied governments for the issue daily
during the peace conference of an of-
cial communication regarding the de-
liberations.
(By Associated Press)
. Washington, Dec. 2.-Congress, in
joint session today, heard President
Wilson announce formally his plans
to visit the peace conference and the
is*uance of his views the government
should play in planningthe after the
war problems.
Democrats of the house received the.
announcement with cheers, in which
some senators joined; the Republicans
were silent almost throughout the ad-
dress except when the, President re-
ferred .to the valor of the American
soldiers and mentioned the names of
Pershing and Simms.
Proud of ountrymen
"I am proud to be the fellow coun-
tryman of men of such stuff and
valor," the President said. "Those of
us who stayed at home did our duty;
the war could not have been won, or
the gallant men who fought it given
their opportunity to win it otherwise;
but for many a long day we shall
think ourselves accursed we were not
there and hold our manhoods cheap
while any speaks that fought, with
these at St. Mihiel or Thierry. The
memory of those days of triumphant
battle will go with these fortunate
men to their graves; and each will
have his favorite memory. 'Old men
forget; yet all shall be forgot, but
he'll remember with advantages what
feats he did that day!"
"What we all thank God for with
deepest gratitude is that our men
went in force into the line of battle
just at the critical moment when the
whole fate of the world seemed to
hang in the balance and threw their
fresh strength into the ranks of
freedom in time to turn the whole
tide and sweep of the fateful strug-
gle - turn it once for all, so that
thenceforth it was back, back, back
for their enemies, always b
never, again forward! After that it
was only a scant four months be-
fore the commanders of the Central
Empires knew themselves beaten;
and now their very empires are in
liquidation."
Interruption a Failure
Threatened interruption by mem-
bers who disapproved of the trip, and
of the President's failure to include a
senator among the peace delegates,
however, did not materialize.
The President's annual address was
read before a crowd that filled the
floor and galleries. He reviewed at
length the country's progress in the
war; he attributed to the forces and'
loyal workers at home. Among other
things he disclosed that the problem
of readjustment is taking care of it-

self without government aid.
Reeommends Women Suffrage
Recommendations included women
suffrage in recognition of women's
work in the war, a request for early
and favorable action on the unratified
Columbian treaty, and a suggestion
that authority should be given the
war trade board or some other body
to continue control for a time over ex-
ports.
The President concluded with tbe
annoucement of his forthcoming trip1
(Continued on Page Four)

CHARN WOOD GIVES
INTERESTING TALK
"The solution of the problems which
confront the league of nations, de-
pends on the co-operation and friend-
ly understanding of the civilized na-
tions of the world," said Lord Charn-
wood in his lecture yesterday on "The
League of Nations' Proposal as It
Affects the British Empire."
Lord Charnwood spoke on India,
elucidating the problem of govern-
ment under the British empire. There,
he said, the natives will be given their
own legislation. This will be brought
about gradually, for the change is too
great to be put into effect immedi-
ately, due to the peculiar people
Great Britain has to deal with.
He brought out the fact that France,
United States, and Great Britain will
be the nations who will determine
what will be the final peace terms
to Germany and her allies.
Lord Charnwood will speak on la-
bor problems and the Irish question
at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon in the
lecture room of the Natural Science
building. The subject of his second
lecture is, "English Domestic Prob-
lems Arising from the War."
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TO AJUST CONTRCTS
UNIVERSITY IS NOT TO SUFFER
FINANCIAL LOSS DUE TO
S. A. T. C.
Adjustments under the contract be-
tween the University and the war de-
partment in regard to the S. A. T. C.
will be made between the committee
on education at Washington and Uni-
versity officials, according to a tele-
gram from the committee. Further in-
formation has been received in a let-
ter to President Harry B. Hutchins,
but nothing in it could be made pub-
lie at present.
Under the contract the University
agreed to feed and provide quarters
for all men in the corps. It then let
sub-contracts to the Union to feed the
men and to the fraternities to billet
them. Later the Union was also given
a contract to quarter part of the
corps.
These contracts all ran to June 30
of next year, but the government has
the right to cancel its contracts at
any time. The contract with the Uni-
versity will be cancelled but authori-
ties here believe that the government
will see to it that this and other uni-;
versities suffer no financial loss, as
they are compensating all manufactur-
ers with whom contracts have been
cancelled.
The contract with the fraternitiest
provides that the University will pay
them seven and one-half cents per
night for each man quartered in thet
respective houses. The fraternities7
have been paid up to Nov. 1. The1
contract extends until June 30, 1919,f
but will be cancelled as soon as terms
of cancellation are agreed upon. The
fraternities will be paid up to theI
time that the contract is discontinued.
SCUDENT COUNCIL
ELECTS OFFICERS
At an important business meeing
of the Student council held Sunday
morning, officers for the year were
elected to fill the vacancies left open1
by men not present in the Universitys
this year. The officers of this organ-'
ization are: Charles T. Van Dusen,t

'19E, president; William M. Bell, '19M,E
vice-president; Walter M. Nugent,
'19E, recording secretary; Sidney G.
Zylstra, '19E, corresponding secre-
tary; Carlton E. Nash, '19, treasurer,
and Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, auditor.
The only other business which took
place was in regard to the plans fort
the Student council age in the Mich-
iganensian war record and in regardl
to class elections, In two instances at#
the elections held recently ties result-
ed and these two classes will hold
their elections over again.
New Projector to Be Used at "Y"I
A big movie program is being plan-
ned for tomorrow night at Newberryt
hall. The Y. M. C. A. has received ac
new projecting machine, one of thet
best in the city As usual, the show willx
be free for all S. A. T. C. and navalr
unit men, and will be the best obtain-L
al

DEAIS BEGUN ON
DEMOBILIZATION
Arrangements on Physical Exams Are
Well Under "Way; Probably to
Take Two Weeks
FINAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM
CHICAGO NOT ON HAND AS YET
Physical examination previous to
discharge of men in the S. A. T. C.
will begin today for section B, and
tomorrow for section A. Two medi-
cal officers, one a dental officer, ar-
rived here yesterday to help the ex-
isting staff examine the men. One
of them, Major Roscoe C. Hubbard,
will be in charge. Lieutenant Mc-
Kasky has been medical officer here
since Captain Vaughan left after the
influenza epidemic subsided.
250 to Be Examined Each Day
It will only be possible to examine
about 250 men each day and as there
are more than 3,600 men here it will
take about two weeks to finish the
examinations. As stated before, this
examination is to determine whether
the men have contracted any disease
or disability while in the service.
No statement could be given out at
military headquarters last night as to
when the actual discharging of men
will take place as the personnel ad-
jutants have not as yet returned from
Chicago where they went for instruc-
tions and forms necessary to the de-
mobilization.
Equipment Being Turned in
Preparations are going forward,
however, in preparation for disband-
ing the corps. Several of the com-
panies have received instructiots to
hand in their rifles and some have
already done so. The signal corps
has been ordered to pack all appa-
ratus in preparation for shipping.
This work will be begun today. In
some of the companies the men have
handed i none of their uniforms and
were told to send the other to the
nearest army quartermaster's head-
quarters within a month after receiv-
ing their discharge. A few of the
companies signed papers relative to
discharge yesterday afternoon.
President Hutchins to Talk
President Harry B. Hutchins will
address the S. A. T. C. and naval unit
this afternoon in Hill auditorium.
His topic will be on the changes and
conditions which will occur during
demobilization. Among these will be
the temptation for the young man,
just out of the S. A. T. C. to leave
college and go to work in some fac-
tory where the wages seem high.
It Is to counteract this tendency that
President Hutchins will turn his ef-
forts. It is his intention to keep as
many men as possible in college
rather than allowing them to go to
work now and neglect their education.
FIREMEN EXTINGUISH SMALL
BLAZE WITH SLIGHT DAMAGE
The fire department was called to
the home of H. A. Sheldon, 714 Mon-
roe street, about 9 o'clock last even-
ing to extinguish a small blaze which
had originated in a chimney fire and
spread to the roof. The damage was
very slight and the blaze quickly ex-

tinguished by a small hand chemical
engine.
COMPANY 4, SIGNAL CORPS, TO
GIVE DANCE AT OLD UNION
a Company 4, Signal Corps, will give
a company dance at 8 o'clock this
evening at the old Michigan Union.
Many of the companies in both sec-
tions of the S. A. T. C. have given
dances and now Company 4 will do its
duty as host. Good music has been
secured and a good time is promised.
Russia Forms All-Russian Government
London, Dec. 2. - A dispatch to
the Central News from Stockholm
says that it is reported that nego-
tiations entered into by Russian rep-
resentatives has resulted in the for-
mation of an all-Russian government
under the protection of the Entente
and supported by a voluntary army.

NAVAL UNIT TO BE
GIVEN RELEASES
Men to Be Placed on Inactive List
Subject to Call for Period of
Four Years
THOSE DESIRING TO REMAIN
TO MAE CHANCE TO DO 40
All men in the University naval
unit who so request will probably be
placed upon inactive duty before
Christmas, according to a statement
from naval headquarters yesterday.
Men in the unit who do not desire re-
lease will be allowed to remain here
under their present status until June,
unless orders to the contrary are re-
ceived from Washington.
Written Requests Required
Any man in the unit who wishes
to be released from active duty must
hand in a written request to the naval
authorities. The request need mere-
ly state that the person applying
wishes to be released from active
duty and wishes to be placed upon
an inactive duty status. No reasons
need be given and no references will
be necessary to obtain this release.
Not a Complete Release
This dismissal from active duty is
not equivalent to the discharge which
will be granted to the men in the S.
A. T. C. Members of the naval unit
have enlisted in the naval reserve for
four years and will be kept on in-
active duty the remainder of their en-
listment period. During this time
they will have to report for active
duty for certain periods each year.
They will receive one dollar a month
pay.
The naval authorities here expect
that some of those in the unit will
not apply for release. The drill and
routine work will be continued as at
present for these men.
4,000 TROOPS ARRIV
INus, , FROM ENGLAND
OFFICIALS PLAN TO DEMOBILIZE
550,000 SOLDIERS BY END
OF JUNE
(From Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2.-Demobilization
plans of the war department today
were outlined by Brigadier-General
Lord, who appeared at a hearing of
the house committee which is seeking
to find out what part of war appro-
priation may be returned to the treas-
ury as the result of the end of the
war. More than 550,000 will be de-
mobilized by June.
New Yok, Dec. 2. - New York, em-
barkation port for many hundred
thousand of American troops bound
for war, heard today the first cheers
of home-coming men of the victorious
army-more than 4,000 of them, from
almost every state in the union-who
joined in a shout that carried across
the waters and into the streets of
down town Manhattan when their
transport, the Mauretania, passed the
Statue of Liberty.
Battery Park and-the Pier on the
Manhattan and New Jersey shores
were thronged with flag waving,
cheering multitudes as the Maureta-
nia moved up to her pier on the North
river.

Wounded Hurried to Hospitals
At the same time, 1,000 wounded
soldiers were being removed ashore
from the troops' ship, Northern PaUl-
fic, at Hoboken. They were hurried
to hospitals in Hoboken, Jersey City
and Staten Island. Both the well and
the wounded will be denied close con-
tact with relatives or friends until
after theyrhave undergonemedical
examination in camp or hospital.
The units from the Mauretania, all
from training fields in England, will
be mustered out at Camp Mills. Fam-
ilies of the wounded will be notified
within a few days of their where-
abouts and permitted to see them.-
Troops Glad to Reach U. S.
Thankfulness at getting home was
the prevailing spirit among the
wounded troops. Few would talk of
the incidents of battle that had sent,
the onstretchers from European_
trenches.

__

SEMESTER PLAN ADOPTED BY REGENTS1
TERM TO END DEC.s21 MAKING 17-AY
VACATION; CONIINLCREDIT GIVEl
DIRECTORY NOT TO GRANT 4 HOURS FOR MILITAI
COME OUT ON TIME I IF 6 HOURS ACADEMIC

On account of the demobilization
of the S. A. T. C. the publication of
the Students Diretory will be held
up until all the men that are going
to remain in the University are lo-
cated in rooming houses. The ad-
dresses which have just been compil-
ed will be useless now that the mili-
tary units are being dismissed. As
soon as the men now in the S. A. T.
C. and naval unit are permanently
located the new addresses will be
obtained and the directory will in
all probability be published in Janu-
ary or the beginning of the new
semester. A directory of the students
of Ypsilanti Normal will possibly be
included in the book as formerly.
FOSDICK SAS TIME FOR
WORLD UNION HS COME
SUPRA - NATIONAL PATRIOTISM
WELDED IN FIRE OF
FIGHT
"In this war our country has emerg-
ed from the international isolation,
upheld by the Monroe doctrine and
by the "no entangling alliances"
principle, to play a major part in all
international affairs," said Dr. Harry
Emerson Fosdick in his lecture on
"The Major Movementsof Our Times
as Seen in France" given at Hill audi-
torum Sunday afternoon.
"I never tried half so hard before
to be a modest American," said Dr.
Fosdick," as when I saw 50,000 of our
boys over there, singing on the way
to battle. Those boys not only went
into battle," he said, "they went into
battle plus."
Reign of Force Reaches Limit
"Supra-national patriotism has been
welded over there in the fire of a
great fight," hesaid, speaking of what
was to him the second major move-
ment. And then, defining patriotism,
"Nationality is a sentiment based on
a community of sacrifice."
Enumerating the different stages
of warfare he said, "Stone hatchets,
bows and arrows, gunpowder, poison-
gas, bacteriology, wireless destruc-
tion-what next?
God has us cornered. We cannot
go the old road to settle our dis-
putes. We've got to find some better
way to settle international troubles
than war." This rising desire for a
league of nations was his third point.
He said, "The tide is setting toward a
flood of international brotherhood."
Lost His Heart to Allies
Dr. Fosdick, when speaking of the
events in England directly after
March, 1918, said, "My hat is off to
Britain ever since I saw that bulldog
jaw of hers tighten and tighten and
stick! I went over there an Ameri-
can, I came back an Anglo-Ameri-
can." Turning to France he related
his visit to the little chapel of Joan
of Arc at Domremy. There over the
innermost shrine he found hanging
(Continued on Page Four)
Red Cross Work
MAust be Kept UP
Signing the armistice has released
thousands of military and civilian
prisoners from Germany and the other
Central powers. These are largely
dependent on the Red Cross for cloth-
ing and other comforts as wll as ne-
cessities. The work of the local chap-
ter has therefore increased rather
than decreased except for surgical

dressings. All workers are asked to
devote as much time as practicabie
to this work during the coming month
as an unusually large quota of knit-
ting and sewing is asked for. Yarn
for sweaters and sox as well as
refugee garments are at the work-
rooms in the Angell house. A large
quota of paper lined vests for the men
in Siberia is also expected and must
be compglted as quickly as possible.

ARE PASSED

GRADE OF "DROPPED"
MAY BE USED FOR "E"
Men Who Completed I. 0. T. C. with
Passing Grade to Get
Four Hours
The University will return immedi-
ately to the semester plan for the re-
member of the present college year,
1918-19, and the Christmas and spring
vacation dates will be as stated in the
catalogue for 1917-18, according to
the action taken by the executive
committee of the Board of Regents.
At a meeting of the Senate council
last week,.this plan was recommend-
ed. The faculties of the literary and
engineering colleges at their meetings
yesterday, resolved that this step
should be taken.
This action will result in giving
the students a 17-day vacation at
Christmas, from the evening of Dec.
21, to the morning of Jan. 7. It is
probably one of the longest Christ-
mas vacations ever granted. The
spring vacation will begin the even-
fhg of April 4, and end the morning
of April 15.
Credit Apportioned
In the literary and engineering col-
leges the faculties also decided that
four hours of credit for military train-
ing shall be granted at the end of
the present semester, to all students
who shall have completed at least two
months of satisfactory work as mnem-
bers of the S. A. T. C. or the naval
unit, and shall have acquired at the
end of the semester at least six
hours credit in academic work. Those
students in the literary college must
also have at least six 'points.
At the meeting of the faculty mem-
bers in the literary college, it was
voted that those students who were
members of the reserve officers' train-
ing corps last year, and had complet-
ed the military work in a satisfactory
manner, shall be given four hours'
credit for the same. It will be an-
nounced later what shall be done
concerning those students who were
members of this organization but did
not receive a pass (P), on their cards.
May Grade "Dropped" Instead of eE"
The members of this facultyfurther
decided that in reporting S. A. T. C.
or naval unit students, any instructor
may, at his discretion, use the mark
"dropped" instead of the usual "E".
This action will greatly affect those
students who, not being able to re-
ceive even a passing grade on a cer-
tain subject, may take the course over
again without any discredit to him.
It is expected that the other col-
leges of the University will follow
these latter measures adopted by the
literary college, for all the instruc-
tors on the campus agree that the
students are deserving of this credit.
England to Pass Kaiser's Extradition
Liverpool, Dec. 2. - Sir Frederick
E. Smith, the attorney general, inter-
viewed today by the Echo said that
the British war cabinet, including the
colonial representatives, has unani-
mously decided to press Holland to
extradite the former German emperor.
U. S. to Help Rehabilitate Turkey
Constantinople, Nov. 30 (delayed).-
American assistance in rehabilitating
Turkey is urged by a group of 12 on
the 15 newspapers here, who have
been joined by the leading Turkish
professional and business associa-
tions.

NOTICE!

PAY UP YOUR PLEDGES!
The United War Work cam-
paign committee desires that all
pledge payments be made as
soon as possible. Make al
checks payable, and address all
payments to Mr. I. Leo Sharf-
man, treasurer, War Work com-
mittee, Lane hall.

I

All persons having bills
against section B, first battalion,
will submit them for payment at
once. (Signed)
LIEUT. J: P. NORVALL.

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