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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 30, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-30

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THE MiCFYJ( 'AN D A I Y

SATURDAY,

a _ 4

Ny fttljgtt aig
~. OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the university year by the Board in
aControl of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS,
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otnerwise credited
in=this paper and also the local news pub-
~ lished herein.
Entered at the postofiice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as Second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Offces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 244.
# Communications not to exceed Soo words,
if signed, the signgature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the commufications.
Mildred C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
Harold Makinson..........business Manager
Charles R. Osius, Jr.............City E6dtor
Marguerite Clark ..............Night Ediwr
Ja mest C. J. Martin.......elegraph Editoi
!a eph A. Bernstein.............port Editor
icetH. Riorden......Military Editi-
Martha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
Mark K. Ehlbert...........Associate Editor
Helen I. Davis ..............Literary Editor
LeGrand A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele.........Publication Manager
Donald M. Major.......Circulation Manager
iSSUE EDITORS
David Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
MargaretsChristie Merman Lustfie
Irene Ellis Bowen Schumacher
EMdna A el Henry O'Brien
aeCrozier Renaud Sherwood
Mary D. Lane Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFl
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
Edward Pieds, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R. Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1918.
Issue Editor-Paul G. Weber
OIL AND WATER-ARMY AND
COLLEGE
One of the blessings that the S. A.
T. C. has given the country is the cer-
tainty- that there will never be uni-
versal military training in universities
and colleges if the universities
and colleges have anything to say
about it. It has been demonstrated
to the satisfaction of army officers
that to learn to be a soldier is a job
sufficiently onerous to take up all the
energy of any man and it has been
dem ionstrated to educational author-
ties that to get a university education
is a job capable of taking all the en-
ergy and time of any one man. It
' is impossible for a man to get a gen-
seral or professional education and
the training of a soldier at the sme
time. Under the S. A. T. C. regime
both jobs were botched, but the schol-
arly job was the more neglected.
To say that West Point is an ex-
ception to the rule is not correct. At
West Point soldiership is the profess-
ion that is taught. Soldiering is the
be-all and the end-all of the curricul-
um, the environment and the tradi-
tions, as much as engineering is the
complete end of the engineering col-
lege. The students at West Point are
taughtto be soldiers, and when civil-
ian employment took West Point grad-
uates it was because some part of the
soldier's job fitted into some part of
the civilian job. That is not an argu-
ment against universal military ser-
vice; that must be discussed on other
grounds; it is merely a statement of
the indisputable fact that college ed-
ucation and military training cannot
be taken together with justice to eith-
er. Nor is it an argument against an
hour or two daily of drilling; that

might be beneficial from a hygienic
point of view, as well as from the
viewpoint of national preparedness.
But the fact remains that living in
barracks, submitting all students,
without regard to their training, tem-
perament, or physical robustness to
the same hours for going to bed and
getting up; keeping students in study
halls, and forbidding them to study
except at designated hours, makes it
impossible for students to get what
they should from their college cours-
es. Further, the physical fatigue of
military training makes the mind in-_
capable of thinking and absorbing
knowledge as well as when the body
is fresh.
From the military standplhi' cias-I
es and study interfere with in:nsive
training. Students have had pract-
ally no bayonet drill, there has n.
been general boxing or wrestling, only
the signal corps has dug trenches
there have been no all-day hikes.
The student-soldier becomes neither
student nor soldier.
The wise lad knows that S. A. T.
C. stands for Stay At The College now.
The war is over in Ann Arbor, and
the internal revolution has begun.
"See yourself at 65." Save your put-
tees for the parades.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
TONIGHT 7:30
Six Reels of Motion Pictures
Social and Eats
After the "Movies"
SUNDAY, 7:30 P. M.
"LAROLA"
an Indian Play given by the
Young Women of the Church
Silver Offering Taken
BALA9NCE OF' POWER
WILL INSURE PEACE
EITHER COMPULSORY TRAINING
OR DISARMAMENT
NEEDED

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* AT THE THEATERS
'--

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TODAY

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Detroit on the Campus, De-
troit-"Seven Days Leave."

* Shube
* "Abe" P
* Perlmut
*Pleasure.
* Majesi
* Claws of
* Women
* Arcad
* Webster
* in "Th
* Comedy.
* Wuert
* and Ant
* Law.".
* "Bees in

rt - Garrick, Detroit -
Potash and "Mawruss"
ter in "Business Before

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; c-Charles Ray in "The
f the Hun." Comedy, "Wild
and Tame Lions."
le- Corinne Grffith and
Campbell (an alumnus)
e Girl of Today." Also'
h - Mrs. Vernon Castle
onio Moreno in "The First
Also News and Comedy
n the Bonnet."

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but Mr. Fairbanks seems thoroughly
at home therein.
Marjorie Daw is Mr. Fairbanks'
leading woman and a remarkable list
of players has been provided to inter-
pret the other roles. Chief among
these are Frank CampeauyHerbert
Standing, Bull Montana. Jay Dwig-
gins and Kathleen, Kirkham.
AT THE DETROIT OPERA HOUSE
At the Detroit Opera House (on the
Campus) next week, beginning Sun-
day evening, Dec. 1, Oliver Morosco
wvi1 present the smart comedy, "Lom-
bardi, Ltd.". by Frederic and FannyI
Hatton, with the original company!
headed by Leo Carrillo. "Lombardi,
Ltd." was an all-seascn success in
'Tew York last year and played a
long engagement in Chicago this
summer and autumn. Detroit is one
of the first cities outside of these.
two in which the play will be seen.
"Lombardi, Ltd," is the story of a
male modiste, a temperamental Ital-
ian, who thinks that he is in, love
with one of his customers, but when
disaster threatens him, then he is able
to pick out the true friends from the
false and to see that it is really his
faithful lhtle shop assistant to whom
his heart belongs.
Mr. Carrillo's performance as Tito
Lombardi was hailed as one of the
triumphs of character acting of the
past season in New York. Also in the
company are Grace Valentine as the
movie-mad mannequin, Mary Kenne -
dy, Warner Baxter, Winifred Bryson,
Marion Abbott, Jane Meredith, Hal-
lam Bosworth, Ina Rorke Helen
Wolcott, Charles Wellesley, and Har-
old Russell.

FOR CHRISTMAS

Personal
Greeting
Cards

Ask to see the latest and correct styles-
Christmas Engraving a Specialty at

ORDER THEM NOW

ww

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

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Orpheuy - Ruth Clifford in
"The Lure of Luxurydy Also News
and Comedy.

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

We make our own baked goods.

"We must either have universal
military training or disarmament,"
said Dr. Robert T. Crane, in an inter-
view yesterday afternoon. "If we are
going to exist on the old plan, then
military training is necessary. How-
ever, an arrangement may be made
by the combined nations by which mil-
itary training can be partially elim-
inated. In any case each country
must have an army large enough for
a demand for a defensive nucleus and
for the prevention of internal insur-
rections.''
The plan of having a navy suffi-
ciently large to protect this country
is impractical for more than one rea-
son, Dr. Crane believes. In the first
place, it would be impossible for a
navy to insure protection to the Unit-
ed States on account of the Canadian
and Mexican frontiers. England's
navy was not successful in furnish-
ing protection for the British Isles.
If the United States had a powerful
navy the other countries would have
large armies and this would lead to
an intolerable system of militarism.
If we are to go back to the old basis,
Dr. Crane favors the Swiss plan of
military training.
"Disarmament can only come*
.through a league of nations. Even
then it cannot be complete. The real
question is, as Dr. H. C. Adams says,
not concerning the direct relations be-
tween the big nations, but as regards!
the political and economic rivalry of
these more powerful nations for the
control of the little countries. To ob-
tain a balance of political and eco-
nomic power, will be the aim of the
proposed league of nations. This will
involve a system so complicated that
it is doubtful whether any satisfac-
tory solution can be found. If such a
plan can be worked out, however, it
will eliminate nine wars out of 10.
Absolute freedom from wars cannot
be hoped for."
COMEDY CLUB TO KEEP
ACTIVE DURING YEAR 1918-19
The first meeting of the Comedy
club for the year 1918-1919 was held
yesterday in the Cercle Francais
room. The members decided that the
club should remain active this year.
It was voted that the men who are
in khe service should not 1e drop-
ped from the rolls of the club, and
that no officers be elected for the
time being.
The next meeting will be called
about the first of the year. Tryouts
wil not be held until the officers are
elected. As few members are in the
University at present, it was voted
that a play would not be given for
some time.
Yale University to Exchange Teachers
Yale university announced officially
the completion of plans for an allied
interchange of students and teachers.
A pamphlet in English and French
will describe the facilities offered
foreign students at Yale.
The graduate school will provide
special courses for foreign students
Leading educators of European coun-
tries are to be brought more fre-
quently to Yale.
! Hardesty, '1 551ies of Pneumonia
Fr d D <a ndy. 15P, died Monday
of poxn nm a wi-ch resulted, after a
shot ies. from influenza. His home
was in Canon. Ohio, where he was
employed as a graduate pharmacist
by a large drug company.
Cosmos to Hold Practice
Regular practice of the Cosmopol-
itan football club will be held at Fer-

ry field this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
All men are asked to be prompt in
reporting.

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AT TilE )lIVAdLNIXl

Through arrangements made by
The Michigan Daily and the manage-
ment of the Majestic theater, returns
of the Michigan-Ohio State game will
be announced at frequent intervals,
the patrons will be informed of all im-
portant plays, and events and results
of the game in addition to the regular
program consisting of Charles Ray in
his latest production, "The Claws of
the Hun," the same being the story
of an active young man who could not
enlist and who started a war of his
own "over here." The comedy fea-
ture of the bill is really one of the
best laugh makers seen this season.
"Wild Women and Tame Lions," is
the title and was produced by Fox
under the famous Sunshine comedy
branch. A Universal weekly com-
pletes the program.
Optimism humor, excitement and
novelty are the principal features of
Douglas Fairbank's new photoplay,
' He comes Uip Smiling," which will
be presented at the Majestic theater
tomorrow, Monday and Tuesday. The
farce upon which the picture is based,
was highly successful on the stage
several years ago, but it is said the
screen version is even more satisfac-
tory to those who like the ingredients
which have been provided by Mr. Fair-
banks in this splendid production.
The part of Jerry, who is known
by the Knights of the Road as "The
Watermelon," that of a young man
who has ambition, but who is inclin-
ed to live a lire of vagaboudage. Lured
by the green wood and an irrestible
desire to experience new sensations
along the broad highway, Jerry is a
character which stands out distinctly
as one of Mr. Fairbanks' most novel
and enjoyable screen characteriza-
tions.
The picture is filled with numerous
novel situations and the action is ex-
ceedingly rapid. Jerry chases a can-
ary bird over hill and dale, into houses
and over housetops; he is in turn
chased by a bevy of bees and he does
remarkable stunts in a wild automo-
bile drive a' ross a mountain. The role
of the tramp is unique even in his
record of unusual characterizations,

TUTTIE'S LUNCH ROOM

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

/.__ _.-
I

LYNDON

719 N. University

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are re-
ported today by the commanding gen-
eral of the American Expeditionary
Forces: Killed in action, 95; died of
wounds, 81; died of accident and oth-
er causes, 9; wounded severely, 28;
wounded slightly, 135; missing in ac-
tion, 311. Total, 659.
HOSPITAL INMATES GIVEN
ENTERTAINMENT BY Y. W. C. A.
The University hospital was a scene
of entertainment on Thanksgiving
day, when college girls entertained
the patients in all the wards. This
was done under the uspices of the so-
cial service of the University Y. W.
C. A. The program consisted of read-I
ingsoy wnmiect arsos, s; vcn'

Ann Arbor representative dealer in EASTMAN KODAKS, films
and supplies, and photographer to Michigan Students. We do
THE amateur finishing business in Ann Arbor because we do
the kind that brings them and keeps them here. -- --

Established in 1900'.

Growing bigger and better every day since.

I

rr . - r rrU

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES,
________ AT
SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

z
1

ings by Winifred Parsons, '19; violin
selections by Grace E. Albrecht, '21,
and patriotic and college songs by the
University Girls' Glee club.
Signal Corps to Meet Flyers
The Signal Corps eleven will play
the strong Squadron C team from,
Selfridge field on Ferry field today at
2:30. The contest is going to prove:
to be an interesting affair. Young,
who is reputed to be a strong tackle,
will play with the home team. There
is a possibility that "Pat" Smith the
former Michigan star, will be in the
line-up of the visitors.

I -"-

m

_..._

\

Hotel Allenel I
ANN ARBORS' IEADING HOTEL

A

Chicken Dinner
11:30 to 2:00

UNCLE SAM SAYS:
"'Our people will be wise
and patriotie enough not
to negleot the reoreation
moessary to m alnat si n
their effiolenoy." What de
you say?
ts toorroeW's DaI fer nawer

$1.00

Special Attention Given to Dinner
Parties and Banquets

ROLLER SKATING AT THE COLISEUM
Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Nights'-7? to 10

Saturday Aftornoon--2 to 5
Ladies, 15c

Men, 25c
J, H. WEIKBERS

CARL WEINBERG

WALTER L KURTZ

s

MARLEY 2/2 IN
DEVON 2L/4 IN.
CEOLLARS
CLUET Yl1'ABtDV&CGnr carcm .TRVY.

The ultimate test of good clothes
is not made by the manufacturer
It is to be found in the sort of
men who wear them.
Are they discriminating, leaders
in their localities,successful men
of their affairs? Then their
choice is perforce one in which
you will be mterested.
We have the latest models of
clothes that have passed this ul-
timate tesit. They are th. choice
of leaders everywhere. They
are Adler-Rochester Clothe.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbon and Jackson
(October 27, 1 1i)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-?:te a.
mn., and hourly to %:to .,. .
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--:4$
a. m., and every hour to 9:43 p. m. (1tx-
presses make local stops west of Ana Arbor.)
Local Cara East Bound-6: s a. m., and
every two hours to 9 :eo p. M,:, 0:-'50 p. M.
To Ypsilanti ealy, 11:43 p. In., Is:"o a. ia.,
i:re a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Wost Bound-7 :4 a. m., to
12:20 a. 1in
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Plane 1420.8
114 S. StateSt. Au, Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital nd Surplus, $W ,000.00
Rlsourees ........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor.. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O Do MO R R L L
Tyawrhers 4.
Typhiriling
*IM10gruphlng

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See Our Large
Stock of
ELGIN, WALTHAM AND SWISS
MILITARY WATCHES

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- Also -
FOUNTAIN PENS
WATERMAM and CONKLIN
Schlanderer
& Seyfried
LIBERTY STREET

LUTZ CLOTHING STORE
217 SoupDMile Shot,
211Solk ai Stai 'Clothes

Has moved te
Niekels Armide Phone 1713
First Fleer

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Wl'

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