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November 30, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-30

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THE
FAIR

WEATHER
AND COOLER r af

juattx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I-

VOL. XXIX. No. 52. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

5 ! A. T.C EMOBILiZATION WOR-K IN
UNIVERS ITY TO BEGIN- IMMEDIATELY;!
448 MEN, PLAN ON LEAVING COLLEGE
ENTIRE DISBANDING OF CORPS TO BE FINISHED DECEMBER 21;
FRATERNITIES TO GET HOUSES BACK
WITH REPAIRS MADE

NO ORDERS COME
FOR NAVAL UNIT
Lieut. A. E. Boak stated definitely
that no orders had been received con-
cerning the demobilization of the
naval unit. He said, "Every navy man
must await orders and do his duty."
In answer to the question as to where
the navy men who were left would
be barracked should some of them be
discharged, he said that nothing
would be done until the policy of the
navy department had been learned.
GERMANY MUST PAY FOR
MURDERS, SAYS PREMIER

MAJOR DURKEE MAKES FINAL
URGES CONTINUATION OF

SPEECH TO MEN;
UNIVERSITY WORK

May Wear 'Uniform Two Months or Go Into Citizen's Clothes at Once;
University Credit to Be Given if
Quarter Is Finished

LLOYD GEORGE SAYS
SHOULD PRODUCE
VENTION

VICTORY
PRE-

BULLETIN
Washington, Nov. 29.-The complete
demobilization of the S. A. T. C. com-
prised of units in many educational
institutions over the country was fin-
ally decided upon by the war de-
partment,' Secretary Baker announced
last night. The demobilization is to
start immediately 9nd is expected to
be completed about Jan. 1.
More than 600 institutions, with an
'enrollment of 160,000, will be affect-
ed. The organization was originally
planned as a reserve for officer mate-
rial.
The process of liquidating the con-
tracts with the different universities
has already been started.,
Arrangements for the disbandment
of the University of Michigan unit of
the S. A. T. C., which is the argest
in the country, will be handled ac-
cording to the army regulations for
the release of men from service. Many
of the details must yet be worked out
by headquarters. As special cases
come up they will be taken care of
but on the whole the operation will
proceed according to the standard
provisions of army regulations.'
The men will turn in one of their
uniforms and be allowed to keep one
to wear for a period of two months.
This provision is intended for those
who have not citizen clothes to put
on immediately. Those who wish to
may discard their uniforms as soon
as they are discharged. Those who
keep one uniform are required to turn
it in when the period of two months
is up.
Major Durkee to Remain to End
Officers now stationed here will re-
main to take care of the work of dis-
banding the men. It is likely that
some of the lieutenants will be giv-
en releases gradually as the need for
them is lessened, according to a state-
ment from headquarters. Major Ralph
H. Durkee will remain and have
charge of the work of demobilization
until completion.
Four hundred forty-eight S. A. T.
C. men' stated that they would be
forced to drop out of college if the
corps was disbanded, in answer to
the question put to them a few days
ago in regard to it.
Sergeant-major Fischer said yester-
day that he believes this figure prob-
ably represents the number of men
who would not have entered college
at all if they had been required to
(Continued on Page Four)
ORGANIZATIONS LATE
Copy and contracts for the
1919 Michiganensian War rec-
ord must be at the offices in the
Press building by tonight. Many
organizations and classes have
not yet sent in their material or
contracts for pages, but they
must arrangements today if they
desire representation in the
book. No copy will be accepted
after today unless' specal ar-
rangements are made at once
with the managing editor, phone
16-J. There will be only one edi-
tion this year and organizations
which are not represented in
this book will have to wait un-
til 1920. Seniors should make
appointments with the photo-
graphers, Swain, Randall, Rent-
schler, or White, for their pic-
tures not later than today. Dates
for sittings will be made for
next week. A list of the organ-
izations not yet accounted for
will be found on page four of
The Daily.

Major Durkee Addresses Corps
Official announcement of the de-
mobilization of the S. A. T. C., to be-
gin Dec. 2 for section B, and Dec. 4
for section A, was made at an as-
sembly of all the men in the corps
yesterday afternoon in Hill auditor-
-ium, by Major Ralph H. Durkee,
commanding officer.
''The status and discipline of the
corps will remain the same until the
day of discharge," he announced,
"and upon each man's discharge pa-
pers will be written his character rec-
ord.
Character Record Counts
"Up to this time I believe every
man in the corps has a good record,
but around time of demobilization
morale tends to decrease, and you
men must be careful of your conduct
until you receive your discharges, for
the chAracter record will be a big
factor in getting you good jobs.
"Preference in time of discharge
will be given men who desire to dis-
continue their courses at the Univer-
sity," Major Durkee declared. He ex-
plained that the men may secure in-
formation concerning clothing, trans-
portation, insurance and other de-
tails from their company command-
k ers later, as someone has been sent
to Chicago to find out about them.
Urges Men to Stay in College
After making these announcements
he gave what he said would be his
last address to the men as soldiers.
He urged the men who could to re-
main In ollege, saying, "To have at-
tended the' University of Michigan is
a thing to be proud of. It is the
oldest and one of the largest state
universities. Even to have been in-
side its doors is something that one
may tell with pride.
"I sincerely hope that you will stay
here to continue your studies or, if
not, that you have gained a desire
for learning and will spread it among
the people of your community when
you return, especially to the young.
"I hope that your training here has
shown you that men who can do
things are always wanted, that reg-
ular hours and hard work will bring
success."
Out of the Army by Dec. 21
Lieutenant Montague, adjutant, then
told the men that only men who have
particular and pressing business or
personal reasons should make appli-
cation for immediate discharge to
their company commanders. "You will
all be out of the army by Dec. 21,"
he said. "We cannot guarantee more
than that, as there are many details
to work out before demobilization."
Prof. Lewis M. Gram speaking for
the University, further urged the men
of section A to remain in school. He
said that the faculties of the several
colleges realized that men in the S.
A. T. C. had necessarily missed a
great deal of work and hence will be
patient and considerate and will help
the men make up the work they have
missed. He . brought out the point
that "men who do things" are al-
ways needed in civil as well as in
military life, and that a man with
a college education is better equip-
ped from any standpoint.
Should Keep Up Insurance
Major Durkee read a letter from
the director-general of education
urging the men to keep up their in-
surance after they returned to civil
life. The letter explained that the
policies are renewable annually for
five years after the declaration of
peace and then may, without further
physical examination, be exchanged
for policies of government directed
insurance companies.

Newcastle. England, Nov. 29.-Ger-
many must pay the cost of the war
to the limit of her capacity, Premier
Lloyd George declared, in a speech
delivered here today.
He arrived at the conclusion that
the former German emperor was guil-
ty of an indictable offense for which
he should be held responsible. He de-
clared that the victory of the Allies
in the world war was due to the valor
of the men.
"We are now approaching the peace
conference," he said. "The fruit of
the victory is not vengeance, it is pre-
vention. * * * In the interests of
security and fair play, it should be
made clear that they merit punish-
ment for what they have caused. *
* * * Germany must pay the cost
of the war up to the limit of her ca-
pacity.
"Is no one to be made responsible
for the war? Somebody has been re-
sponsible for the war which has tak-
en the lives of millions of the best
young men of Europe."
Sergi,-Mtajor to
Wed Junior Girl
The engagement of Margaret Paul-
ine Benedict, '20, to Alfred Fischer,
Sergeant-major of the S. A. T. C. here,
was announced at the Gamma Phi Beta
sorority house, last evening.
Miss Benedict is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Benedict of Ionia,
Mich. She is the managing editor of
the Inlander for the current year, a
member of Gamma Phi -Beta sorority
and of Wyvern, junior women's hon-
orary society.
Sergeant-major Fischer is a former
student of Miami university. After
leaving school in 1913 he went into
newspaper and magazine work. He
was a member of the first draft con-
tingent of section B of the S. A. T. C.,
which was sent here in April of this
year. He received the position of
sergeant-major in October.
The date of the marriage has not
been announced but the cer'emony will
probably take place in January or
February.
RUSSIAN CLUB TO DISCUSS
CZECHO-SLOVAK PROBLEMS
The Russian club will hold its first
meeting of the year at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in the parlors of Barbour
gymnasium. Prof. F. G., Novy, of the
medical department, will lecture on
the "Czecho-Slovaks." He Is a Czech
himself and can speak with authority
on the long struggles of that people
which have now been rewarded with
their newly formed republic.
The purpose of this organiation is
to disseminate correct knowledge of
Russia and her conditions. All peo-
ple interested in Russia and her prob-
lems are eligible to membership. The
meetings of the Russian club are al-
ways open to the public, which is in-
vited to attend.

MICHIGAN TO MEET
SCALEND GRAY
Game This Afternoon to Decide Big
Ten Honors as Well as Last
Game of Year
YOSTMEN ACKNOWLEDGED
LEADERS OF CONFERENCE
Michigan's Varsity football eleven
will -rot out on the gridiron at Qhio
State University this afternoon to fight
two battles.
Together with meeting the last year
championship Conference eleven, the
Wolverine squad is going to battle
for the 1918 honors of the Big Ten.
With the withdrawal of the Illinois
team from even a proposed game for
the honors with the Maize and Blue
squad, the right to the championship
will hinge on the result this after-
noon.
Although the Ohio State' bunch is
not necessarily in love with the Suck-
er state eleven, they will do all in
their power to see to it that the Wol-
verines will leave the Buckeye state
capitol with a defeat in their hands.
Contest for Honors
Yet Coach Yost and the majority
of the Michigan eleven will fight for
their lives this afternoon, and it is a
safe bet that the Maize and Blue will
establish their claims to the Big Ten
honors in this afternoon's contest.
The Buckeyes, it is said, are not as
strong as they have been in the past,
yet word from the capitol city is to
the effect that they have been prepar-
ingfor the Wolverines. The Buckeyes
have for a long time entertained the
idea that they could win from the
Michigan eleven, and they are work-
ing to make this afternoon's opportun-
ity prove it.
The championship of the Conference
for the Maize and Blue will hinge
upon the score of the game. If the
Yostmen wallop the Buckeyes by a
score greater than that of the Illin-
ois team, their claim to the honor will
be undisputed.
Yostmen to Fight
Michigan's eleven will fight this
afternoon like it has never fought be-
fore. With the Syracuse and M. A. C.
games safely tucked away in their list
of victories, and with the Illinois
team refusing to meet them, it is a
self evident fact that the Sucker state
team is afraid to meet the Yostmen.
Their excuse that the academic au-
thorities will not permit the game
seemsp to be camouflage more than
anything else, for at one time they
asked Athletic Director Bartelme for
a contest.
(Continued on Page Three)
EXPECT RETURN OF
SEMESTER SYSTEM
Now that the S. A. T. C. is disband-
ed, and the University does not have
to wait for word from Washington,
the return to the semester system
rests with the executive committee
of the Board of Regents, who will
consider the question as soon as
President Harry B. Hutchins returns
from New York. "It cannot be done
too soon," said Registrar Arthur G.
Hall.
In view of the fact that the Senate
council composed of the deans of the
different colleges and a professor
from each dipartmient, voted unani-
mously in favor of resuming the old
system, it is not unreasonable to ex-

pect the Board of Regents to ratify'
it also.
The University was expecting the
disbanding of the S. A. T. C., and
hence proceeded slowly in commu-
nications with Washington concern-
ing rearrangement of the terms. The
student body may expect to know
definitely within the next few days
what the decision will be.

NURSES MAY JOIN
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
Elsie Erley '20. chairman of the
membership committee of the Wom-
en's league, invites the nurses in
training at the University hospital to
join the Women's league. These nurs-
es are enrolled in the University and
meet the same requirements as other
students. When they graduate, they
receive their degrees through the Uni-
versity. 1
University womi are therefore
anxious that they should take an ac-
tive part in activities on the campus,
and that they should be drawn into
closer relationship with the women
in the colleges. Dean Myra B. Jor-
dan is in favor of the co-operation
which the Women's league is attempt-
ing to establish between the two
groups of women.
MICHIGAN UNION PLANS
IMMEDIATECOMPLETION
TEMPORARY BUILDING AND FIX-
TURES TO BE TORN
DOWN
Rapid conversion of the Union to
its peace time function as the social
center of the University, was predic -
ed by Secretary Homer Heath, in a
interview yesterday. The chanar-e
following the demobilization of the
S. A. T. C. will necessarily be incom-
plete, but they will enable the b
student organization to serve the cam-
pus effectively. The announcement
from Washington is so sudden thai
the plans of Union officials have noti
been worked out in detail.
Prepare to Serve 1feals
The dining room will open to ser e
high grade meals to regular boarders,
at popular prices. Most of the fratern-
ities will not start tables at this time
of the school year, and it is expected
that several hundred of these men will
eat at the Union. A large quick-lunch
room in the basement will be ready
for occupation first.
The army men rooming in the build-
ing will leave as demobilization pro-
ceeds. Mustering out of the navy
will take a longer time, so that it is
possible that the sailors may be mov-
ed into the Union building. But
even this will not delay the clearing
of the building.
Construction work will be pushed,
but only the necessities will be fin-
ished at first. After the lunch room in
the basement is completed, the fourth
floor rooms and the billiard room will
be finished. The rest of the building
will be completed as the subscription
payments come in.
/ Membership to Be Increased
To complete the building the Union
borrowed $260,000 from the State War
board last summer. Of this, $32,000
has been paid back, payments on sub-
scriptions will gradually take care of
the rest. Temporary constructions,
such as the frame mess hall, cost
$15,000. Removing this building will
cost another $5,000, but it is expected
(Continued on Page Four)
C' m'op, Skinnay!
Irv Cobb's Here
Irvin S. Cobb recently wrote of
eating in three languages. It would
be interesting to hear the language
he would use after eating at the
Michigan Union mess. He has receiv-
ed an invitation to eat there with the

men before he speaks at 8 o'clock to-
night at Hill auditorium.
An idea of the depths of optimism
to which Mr. Cobb will descend may
be gathered from the fact that he
wrote humorously of being confined
in a German prison camp. Then he
wrote a story about an operation per-
formed on himself that made every-
body laugh except the doctor.
Mr. Cobb's great and lasting hold on
fame is that he is the world's great-
est reporter. When he was a corres-
pondent with the German armies, the
Germans tried in every way to prove
to him that the British were violating
international law by using dum-dum
bullets. They went to great lengths
in faking evidence to that effect, but
Mr. Cobb had dealt with American pol-
iticians, so he was not deceived. He
got the facts and discarded the fakes.
He will tell of German methods with-
out hysteria, but will be none the
less convincing.

PEACE CONFERENCE
DELEGATES NAMED:
WILSON IS MEMBER

COMMISSION OF 5
LANSING, HOUSE
WHITE

INCLUDES
AND

GENERAL TASKER BLISS
ARMY REPRESENTATIVE
Allied Nations Send Premiers and
Military Men to Peace
Table
(From Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 29.-The repre-
sentatives of the United States to the
peace conference will be President
Wilson, Robert Lansing, secretary of
state, Henry White, former ambas.
sailor to France, Colonel E. M. House,
and General Tasker Bliss, represen-
tative of the American army to the
supreme war council at Versailles.
This announcement was made to-
night at the White house. It was as-
sumed that the President goes as the
head of the commission. Secretary
Lansing, Colonel House, General
Bliss and Mr. White will be represen-
tatives with full ambassadorial pow-
ers.
Wilson Not to Stay Whole Time
The statement issued from the
White house today said It was not
likely that the President could re-
main through the entire sitting of
the peace conference and that he
would be accompanied by delegates
who would sit, as the representatives
of the United States.
The White house announcement
says:
"The President, the secretary of
state, Henry White, Colonel E. M.
House, and General Tasker Bliss will
make up the commission." It was ex-
plained that it was not possible to
announce these appointments before
because the number of representa-
tives each nation was to send had,
until a day or two ago, been under
discussion.
General Bliss Surprise
Washington officials would add
nothing more to the announcement.
No one in the confidence of the Pres-
ident would add anything. There was
only one surprise-the appearance of
the name of General,Bliss as one of
the representatives.
Only yesterday callers at the White
house gave a very distinct impres-
Ssion thatthere would be but three
delegates of full rank. It was sug-
gested tonight that the naie of Gen-
eral Bliss was added at the last mo-
ment upon the receipt of the infor-
mation that the allied powers would
include military men.
The premiers of Great Britian,
France, and Italy are expected. to at-
tend the peace conference as repre-
sentatives of their governments, but
iike President Wilson, they will not
remain throughout the entire confer-
ence.
The general understanding is that
the heads of the governments will re-
main to agree upon the broad prin
ciples, but will leave the working out
of the details to later sittings. This
would enable the premiers and the
President, to speedily return to their
capitals to give their personal atten-
don to their state affairs.
Ex-Kaiser Ailhelm Has the Flu
London, Nov. 29.-The former Ger-
man emperor is ill with the flu, ac-
cording to a telegram received here
today from Amsterdam.
OHIO STATE GAME RETURNS
Play by play returns of the
Michigan-Ohio State game will
be posted by bulletins at The
Daily offices this afternoon. An-
nouncements of all the plays
will also be made at the Maj-
estic theater by special arrange-

ments with The Daily. An ex
clusive leased wire will give
The Daily the 'news direct from
the field at Columbus, where a
special Daily correspondent will
remain in continual communica-
tion with the Ann Arbor offices.
The first returns will be posted
about 1:30 o'clock.

SOCIAL
Presbyterian Church
Corner Huron and Division Streets
TONITiE, 7:30
Men of Army and Navy and all Presbyterian
Young People are cordially invited.

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