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November 22, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IA. Y

i i A

[AL NEWSPAPER AT THE
VERSITY OF MICHIGAN
d every morning except Monday
university year by the Board in
Student Publications
OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ociated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news dis-
:dited to it or not otherwise credited
per and also the local news pub-
in.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter.
ions by carrier or mail, $3.8o.
Ann Arbor Press Building.j
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
ications not to exceedt 300 words,
he signature not necessarily to ap-
nt, but as an evidence of faith,and
events will be published in The
he discretion of the Editor, if left
:d to the office.
I communications will receive no
n. No manuscript will be re-
ss the writer incloses postage.
ly does not necessarily endorse the
expressed in the communications.)
Mighell.......Managing Editor
akinson...... ,...Business Manager

)sius, Jr........ City
Cark ............Night
Martin.......Telegraph
ernstein........Sport
Riorden........Military
nsey........ Women's
lbert.......Associate

zitor
Edier
Ediw:
ditor
Editor
Editor
Editor

fand A. Gaines..Advertising Manager
a L. Abele........Publication Manager
aid M. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
id Landis HPaul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
REPORTERS
e Apel John Kyser
baret Christie Herman Lustfield
ailey Philip Ringer
e Ellis Bowen Schumacher
a Hains Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Wi. A. Letzinger
"IRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1918.
Issue Editor-David Landis
H Y RAISE THE HATE-SONG
NOW?
[ate isthe emotion which goes with
and is inseparable from it. Un-
ly as hate in all its forms is, it
ily when it is associated with fear
t most, of us condemn it -utterly.
one has a good word to say for
rardly malice, but the form of hate
dominant in war has elements of
rage and righteous indignation
.ch redeem it in our eyes. But
pual malice, savagery, and the de-
to cause suffering are also a part
t and have been considered a nec-
ary part.
. long as differences are settled
force, the good elements in strife-
red will probably continue to
tgle with the bad ones. But in
er to develop these good elements
the men who have taken part in
y war either at the front or at
ae, it has been the theory of many
t a direct appeal should be made
the brute factors also. Now, in
er to develop the savage possibil-
s of civilized man, all the train-
of a life-time must be forgotten,
our civilization strives at every
i to keep these tendencies dormant
to turn them into useful channels,
1 the more it does this, the higher
consider it.
row comes war and reverses this
cess. ,An editorial writer made the
tement not many months ago, that
make good fighters, men must be
I lies about the enemy. He directly
'ocated the spreading of tales of
'man atrocities which were unsub-
tiiated by the facts, as a means of
sing the passions of our soldiers
Epeople. Hate is necessary to war,
s his premise, and since reason and
inary human sensibility must be
,dened to produce a hardy variety
hiate, therefore, deaden reason with
t and sensibility with ignorance.
ocking as this theory sounds, for
r men have the courag to analyze
ts so relentlessly, this is the basis
which much of the war talk of
led countries as well as of Ger-
ny has been spread. Lack of faith
the intelligence of the masses, not
licious deception, is, of course, re-
nsible for this nearly universal and
entially stupid practice. It belongs
the type of reasoning of the priests
Isis who gave out a crude animal-
.c set of gods for the people to be-
0e in, at the same time, holding

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
WEEK-END PROGRAM M
TONIGHT at 7:S0
BIG SOCIAL
Games Music Eats
TOMORROW NIGHT
7:45
Mary Pickford in
THE EAGLE'S MATE
Methodist Students and Friends
Welcome
faith in an esoteric religion of their
own.
Granted, for the sake of argument,
that the gospel of hate needs to be
preached to this generation in order to
get it to fight a war, since so many
apparently sane men hold this view
and practise it by means which they
would scorn to use to any other pur-
pose; the fact which concerns us now
is that the war has been fought and
won, by these means, or more likely,
by the courage and righteous indigna-
tion which leaders of public opinion
discount as unable to stand alone. The
war is over and peace is here. Now
at least it would seem, that war-made
hate has done its work and that it
is time to put it aside. It is as use-
les in the rebuilding of shattered
world confidence as a howitzer is in
reconstruction work in France. The
howitzer needs tobe junkedand re-
cast into a stove, and the hate which
did its work in the war just as the
howitzer did, needs to be recast into
relations of mutual well-wishing.
There are already signs that. most
of the American people, without rea-
soning the matter out, are doing this
very thing. With the house of Hohen-
zollern out of Germany and the pow-
er of the rich landowners of Prussia
muzzled, a growing kindliness toward
the struggling, discredited masses of
Germany is showing Itself. In the
name of heaven, why should it not?
There is only so much confidence in
the world, and as long as we live
together on this little globe we need
every bit of it we can get. Mutual
trust, like material resources and
economic prosperity, is the common
possession of all mankind and por-
tions of it cannot be destroyed with-
out a loss to every nation. The fact
that Germany has been untrustworthy
is a terrible loss to civilization and
although Germany must suffer most
the rest of us are doomed to suffer
also. Therefore, why gloat over Ger-
many's inferiority and treachery,
dwelling upon its enormity and
preaching unforgiveness? Why keep
the world store of mutual respect and
trust which has fallen low enough,
at its present scarcity as long as pos-
sible? Why seek to impress the
awakening German people with a
sense that the world is gleeful at
their humiliation and intends to keep
t1hem prostrate as long as possible?
Godspeed on the long upward road
ahead of them is no extenuation of
German guilt. Any penologist will
tell you that giving a man a chance
when he has shown signs of reforma-
tion is not condoning his original
crime.
Germany must repent in sackcloth
and ashes; this is inevitable. But
what elsewas yesterday's surrender
of the proud German navy, the col-
lapse of a dream of empire, or the
realization that she is living on the
bounty of her conquerors? Why, in

the midst of this situation, should civ-
ilized Americans, presumably having
world-welfare at heart, sing the hate-
song, prolonging the evils of war
when the war has done its work?
The day of destruction of life and
property is over; so is the day of
destruction of good will.
Let us hope that when the four
bands get together this year at the
M. A. C. game to play "The Star
Spangled Banner" they will have de-

Editor, The Michigan Daily: -
What about the food at the mess
hall, Michigan Daily? As the repre-
sentative of Michigan men, wake up
and help them out.
What is wrong with the Michigan
Union which is feeding them? Why
do I hear so many complaints from
the S. A. T. C. men? Surely not be-
cause they are unpatriotic!
Bugs in the beans! Ugh!
It is about high time.
INTERESTED OBSERVER.
cided beforehand what key to play
it in.
Now that the German fleet has sur-
rendered, Salisbury can stop tossing
uneasily in his grave every time Hel-
goland is mentioned.
"What a game there would be if we,
could only get Michigan here for
Thanksgiving Day!"-The Daily Illini.
You said it, Illinois.
How are such essential occupations:
as White House picketing to be con-
tinued while Wilson is in Europe?
S. A. T. C. Officers to Hold Dance
The officers of the S. A. C. C. will
hold a formal dinner dance tonight at
the Michigan Union. About 50 cou-
ples will have dinner in the officers'
mess hall in the new Michigan Union
and will dance later in the old build-
ing. The chaperones for the evening
will be Professor and Mrs. Henry C.
Adams, Mr. ad Mrs. Roy S. Swinton,
and Mr. and Mrs. Horatio Abbott.
Nippon Club Meets Tonight
The Nippon club' will hold a iheet-
ing at 7:45 o'clock this evening in
Lane hall. The principal speakers of
the evening and the subjects on
which they will talk, are: Yuki G. Osa-
wa, on "Japanese in Washington;"
S. YOnemoto, on "Japanese in Brit-,
ish-Columbia;" and H. Iwanaga, on
"Japanese in Hawaii."

BUGS IN THE BEANS!
OBSERVER SAYS S. A. T. C. MEN
COMPLAIN OF MICHIGAN UNION
SERVICE

The Women's league will hold its
first party of the year at 4 o'clock
this afternoon in the parlors of Bar-
bour gymnasium. Dancing and stunts
will furnish amusement and all Uni-
versity women are cordially invited.
There are more vacancies in the
swimming classes, and any girls !ho
desire to elect the course are to reg-
ister now.
Squad leaders are needed for the
classes in apparatus work. Girls may
see Miss Wood today if they desire to
take the work.
Unless more girls register for the
course in indoor military marching it
will not be given. The lists are post-
ed in Barbour gyrnasium where they
may be signed.
If there are any girls who can help
in making Thanksgiving cards for the
hospital, they can call Miss Hulda
Bancroft in Barbour gymnasium, or
at 208.

WAN R'S

'A'
F'

Wornee n

AT WAHR'S
Waldron's Company
Administration $1.50
Books and Supplies
in General for
Soldiers and Sailors

Your

every Banking need

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

fulfilled at the

FOR LIBERTY

Farmers &
101-105 9. Main

Mechanics Bank
336 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the Commanding General
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Kiled in action, 334; wounded,
degree undetermined, 221; wounded
slightly, 224. Total, 770.
100-Mile Range Gun Proposed by U. S.
TheaAmericans may lose achance
to beat the Huns yet-in one direc-
tion. The United States war depart-
ment had proposed to make a 100-
mile long range gun with longer
shooting power than the infernal ma-
chine which shelled Paris. The end
Sof the struggle, however, may stop
further development of this child of
navy brains. The psychological, rath-
er than the. military value of such a
weapon, is counted upon.

BUY YOUR
BOOKS and SUPPLIES
m AT o O K TOR
SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

THE EBERBACH& SON CO.
202-204 East Liberty Street

Help Win The War.
BY PREPARING FOR CIVIL SERVICE
OR BUSINESS
AT
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

GO TO

The Myer-Schairer

Fine Toilet Articles
Good Drugs
and
Laboratory Supplies.

Company

112 S. Main St.

/i

r

THE ANSWER
Billiards and Bowling
HUSTON BROS.
"We try to Treat You Right"

FOR

I

For Two Days Only

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

SATURDAY, NOV. 23
ANDx
MO N DA Y, NOV. 25
WE WILL SELL FOR

.I

I

.

One Dollar and Fifty Cents
ROSSENWASSER'S
IDEAL SPRING PUTTEES
WADHAMS & CO.
STATE STREET STORE

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, r98)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7:zo a.
m., and hourly to g:zo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. M. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. n., xo:o p..
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., z2:20 a. m.E
1:1o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. m., to
12:20 Ia. M.
WAT KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

Chairs

Book Cases

314 S. State St.

-1

I-

Ann Arbor

i m

THE

FRENCH

.To Dances at Armory this week
on account of Red Cross Festival

ARMY

BAND

I

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank.
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

GABRIEL PARES, Conductor

Dances will be held instead at

61 Veteran "BLUE DEVILS" who have been wounded in the
trenches of France and decorated for Bravery.
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT FRENCH SOLDIERS
Hill Auditorium-Sat. Nov. 23.,8 P.M.
TICKETS 25-35-50e AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC

I

O. D. MORRILL
Typewriters 1l it
Typewriting
M--mo'raphn

Packard Academy
Friday Night

Special Dance for
S. A. T. C. at
E Iks' Temple Sat.
Tickets at Busy Bee

A

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