100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
AND CLOUDY
TODAI

4hp 4hr
4AJ Adr\m
AW17 Wtr t

&tit

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I

i

XXIX. No. 45.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

COLE HOUSE FALS
ILL.WITH GIPPE;
CANCELS MEETING
CALN WITNESSES END OF 65TH
CONGRESS; WILSON FAILS TO
VISIT SESSION
CONRESS APPROVES
MEDALS FOR WAR VETS
Senate and House Finish Most of the
Work; Committee Postpones Con-
testing Ford-Newberry Race
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 21. - Col. E. M. House,
the special repreentative of the
United States government. is con-
fined to his home here with influen-
za. He has canceled his engagement.
Washington, Nov. 21. - Bronze
medals to all soldiers and sailors, who
have appeared in the war, was au-
thorized by the house tonight. Sena-
tor Pittman, of Nevada, father of the
resolution, read a letter indorsing it.
Washington, Nov. 21. - The second
session of the 65th, or "war" con-
gress, which began last Dec. 3, ended
at 5 o'clock tonight under a resolu-
tion which had been adopted earlier'
in the day by the senate, 41 'to 18,
and by the house, without objection.
Final Session Starts Dec. 2
The third and final session of this
congress will begin in 11 days, Dec.
2. The adjournment today was de-
void of many of the spectacular fea-
tures usually accompanying -the end-
ing of sessions. .
President Wilson did not go to the
capitol, because no legislation re-
irthg his action was passed by eith-
er body, and only small groups of
spectators waited for the falling of
the gavels of Vice-president Marshall
and Speaker Clark.
Senate Not Contest Michigan Election
During the day congress formally
completed, and sent to President
Wilson, the bill for war-time prohibi-
tion, effective next Jan. 1. The Pres-
ident signed the measure.
Other matters upon which action
was taken before the closing were
confirmation of former Solicitor-gen-
eral John W. Davis, as American am-
bassador to Great Britain, and indefi-
nite postponement by the senate
privileges and elections committee of
action on the resolution proposing a
contest of the election of Truman H.
Newberry, Republican, as senator
from Michigan.
- Women's Senior
Society Initiates
"Say, look at that funny hat that
girl has on."
"That's a mortar-board, you boob,"
said the other S. A. T. C.er. "Only
it is rather early in the season for
them, and she hasn't got her gown on
either."
Fall initiation for Mortarboard, se-
nior girls' honorary society, was held
last night, and during the day the
initiates wore the mortarboard as ex-
pression of their good faith, and un-
derwent the curious glances and mis-
understanding remarks of the general
student body. Those initiated were,

Jane Duemling, Lucille Duff, Martha
Guernsey, Katherine Kilpatrick, Fran-
ces McDonald, Anne McMahon, Ruth
Dailey, Winifred Parsons, Marcia Pin-
kerton, and Olive Wiggins.
The formal initiation was held at
the home of Ida Belle Guthe. Dean
Myra B. Jordan was the guest of
honor, and was also initiated. Many
alumnae were present.

BLUE DEVILS WILL
HAVE BIG WELCOME
The French army. band, known as
the Blue Devils, which is due to ar-
rive in Ann Arbor Saturday, will be
met in a style that befits its reputa-
tion. They will come! in from Lansing
by train about 1 o'clock and will re-
ceive a reception at the depot such
as is rivalled \not even by the home-
coming of a winning football team.
There will be a band to meet them-
the one of the S. A. T. C. and the
naval unit combined. The military
parade, consisting of the fourth bat-
talion of the S. A. T. C., and a detach-
ment from the naval unit, will act as
an escort. From the depot they will
march up State street and directly
to Ferry field.
When Ferry field is reached, a re-
view is to be staged on the football
field in direct view of all the specta-
tors, with all those who were in the
parade taking part. Directly after
the review, a flag-raising is planned
as one of the features of the day.
Both French and American flags will
be raised as the bands play the na-
tional anthems. The S. A. T. C. and
naval units practiced this review yes-
terday afternoon, so it should come
off without a hitch.
The Frenchmen will stay in Ann
Arbor all night, and barracks have
prepared quarters for them on the
third floor of the Union building.
MIHIGAN MANFREED
F1 ROM GERMAN PRISON

PYTE. CONRAD N. CHURCH,
REACHES FRENCH
LINES
Pvte. Conrad N. Church, '17,
merly news editor of The Daily

!17,l

fof-
and

later connected with the reportorial
staffg the Detroit News, who was
captured by the Germans about'three
weeks before the end of the war, has
with 205 others regained the lines. of
the American army of occupation. He
was released Nov. 11 and reached the
lines at 7 o'clock, Friday morning,
Nov. 17.
These 205 men were sent from va-
rious points of capture on the front
to a German prison camp at Louppy,
on French soil. When the nu'mber in
that camp reached 300 the men were
usually loaded on trucks and taken
north to a camp farther from the
front.
The fact that there were but 205
men in the Louppy camp when the
armistice was signed made them the
first to regain the American lines, as
they had but 60 kilmeters to walk.
The released men were given two
days' rations but no directions. Al-
though 40 French prisoners who
caught up with them had maps it
took the party four days to reach
the advance guards of Dickman's
third American army.
Church was cut off and captured
while making observations with offi-
cers in the front line. When last heard
from he was attached to an advanced
ordnance detachment north of the
Verdun hills. The story of the men
who returned with Church is given
in despatches from Raymond G. Car-
roll to the Philadelphia Public
Ledger.
Private Church enlisted last June
and was trained in the ordnance
school at Camp Hancock, Georgia. He
went overseas soon after his bourse
there was complete'd and was attach-
ed to a division in the first Ameri-
can army.
Fresh Medics to Elect Class Officers
At a meeting of the freshman med-
ical class at 4:30 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon, the following officers were
elected for the year: U. A. Carpen-
ter, president; Miss Bess Parham,
vice-,re ident; Miss Emilie Arnold,
secretary; and W. Bauer, treasurer

YANK RED CROSS
NOW ON HUN SOIL
RBoche Accept American Flags, While
German Officers Clear Roads
for Trucks
UNIT CROSSES RHINE RIVER
NEAR SWISS BORDER LINE
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 21.-A delegation of the
American Red Cross has crossed the
Rhine to Baden, in Hunningem, plac-
ing the first Americans on German
soil. The place where the river was
crossed is a short distance north of
the Swiss frontier. The German sold-
iers accepted American flags and of-
ficers cleared the roads for the Red
Cross trucks and insisted that the
Red Cross workers drink with them.
German soldiers' councils in Baden
are selling German arms and sup-
plies. The population, which is rev-
olutionary, is in complete control.
Ragged and famished Italians al-
most raised the roof off the Red
Cross canteen with cheers when the
Americans opened the place.
The Red Cross delegation left Swit-
zerland for Alsace Friday taking with
it a truck loadofesupplies. Two hun-
red Italians were fed. A canteen was
established at St. Louis. Ten thousand
Germans passed the canteen all wear-
ing the revolutionary red ribbor. The
officers and men carried red flags.
To Hold Boxing
Matches Tonight
Many events have been arranged
for this evening by the army Y. M.
C. A. including a feed for the lead-
ers of the S. A. T.-C. and naval men's
Bible classes and a boxing match in
Newberry hall.
1Mr.:DN W. Teachout, of Chicago, wi1l
address the Bible class leaders and
it is expected that a hundred will be
in attendance at this meeting. Mr.
Teachout has charge of the study
classes of the central military de-
partment of the Y. M. C. A. and has
been a camp secretary. The men that
will attend have been guaranteed a
talk worth their time.
At Newberry actual bouts, as well
as boxing instruction, feature the
evening's program. The program will
start promptly at 7 o'clock and con-
tinue throughout the evening. It is
expected at the present time that it
will- be possible for a special com-
mittee appointed from the naval unit
to have a "Navy Night" every Friday
evening beginning within a short time.
FRENCH FACULTY ENTERTAIN
AT CERCLE FRANCAIS REUNION
Informal dramatic exerpts and mon-
ologues by faculty talent featured
the annual social reunion of the Cer-
cle Francais in the society clubrooms.
Following an introductory address by
Prof. Edward L. Adams, former fac-
ulty directr of the Cerce, members
and guests of the society were treat-
ed to mirth-provoking renditions by
Mr. Everett L. Hackes, Mr. Jean Pet-
it, and Prof. E. L. Adams, all of the
French faculty. Mlle. Frieda Bonan
and Mile. Martha Jouard, who are
studying at the University as tem-
porary proteges of the French govern-
ment, assisted with French songs.
Miss Hope Ferguson, '19, resided.
TURKISH MINISTERS ARRIVE

IN DISGUISE AT BERLIN
Amsterdam, Nov. 21.-Emzer Pasha,
the former Turkish minister of war,
and Palaat Pasha, the former grand
vizier, who have arrived at Berlin
disguised as German officers, are to be
interned, according to Berlin) news-
papers pending their expulsion when
peace is declared.

ALL SCHOOLS HOLD
CLASS ELECTIONS

Medic Elections Held Last Week
Enable Them to Adopt
Honor System

to

TWO CLASSES UNABLE TO MAKE
DECISIONS, HOLD NOMINATIONS
Campus election day was featured
as usual by little interest and a small
vote. A hundred people at any of
the class meetings with the exception
of the first year meetings was unusu-
al. Several dead-locks resulted and
the freshmen engineers and senior
lits merely nominated candidates in-
stead of holding both the nomination
and elections as had been planned by
the Student council.
Perhaps more classes held their
elections yesterday than have done so
in any one single day for many years.
The organization worked in an ex-
cellent manner and the councilmen
in charge deserve commendation upon
the way the work was planned and
executed:
The elections resulted as follows:
The senior lit nominations, result-
ed in the nomination of Laurel A.
Lundquist and Alfred Mason for pres-
ident, Mary Overman and Emma Riggs
for vice-president, Marcia Pinkerton.
Emily Powell, and Evadne Wright for
secretary, and George B. Berg and
George R. Ferguson for treasurer.
Junior lits- president, Carl John-
son; vice-president, Grace Hall;
treasurer, William Leitzinger; secre-
tary, Ruth Abbott; oratorical dele-
gates, David Nash and Aimee Renkes.
Sophomore lits-President, Hugh C.
White; vice-president, Alice E. Beck-
ham; secretary, Marion C. Spaulding;
treasurer, Albert C. Jacobs, oratorical
delegates, Bruce Garland and Dorothy
Dunlap.
Freshman lits - President, Frank
Steketee; vice-president, Alethea
-Yerkes; treasurer, Philip Ringer; sec-
retary, Margaret Tibbals. Only a few
attended the first year meeting and
little pep was displayed.
Senior laws-President, tie between
Jay Stough and T. V. Evensar; vice-
president, Emil Annebel; secretary,
William O'Connell; treasurer, John
Simpson; oratorical delegate, J. I.
Dickenson. The senior law election
was an exception to the rule, every
member of the class being present
and voting. ,Another meeting will be
held to decide the tied vote.
Junior laws-President, A. B. Turn-
er; vice-president, Kelsey Guilfoil;
secretary, S. K. Jackson; treasurer,
W. F. Fellows; oratorical delegate,

ATHLETIC PROGRAM
ON SALE SATURDAY
With the army and navy dominating
the football program of the M. A. C.
game, it will be ready for circulation
tomorrow.
This year's M. A. C. program is one
of the best in the history of the
school, according to those who have
seen many of them. From the cover,
to the last page, it is both attractive
and interesting. The army and navy,
as well as the football squad, are rep-
resented in the three color cover. The
blue of the navy and the khaki of the
army are both prominent on the out-
side sheet's.
The program is highly illustrated
with pictures of both teams, the indi-
vidual men on the squads, and the
coaches. A photograph of Tad Wei-
man, captain in absentia of the 1918
squad is featured, while the honor
page is dedicated to Major Durkee of
the S. A. T. C. of the University, with
a full page cut, surrounded by a U.
of M. border.
Articles on M. A. C.-Michigan re-
lations, The S. A. T. C. and Football,
A Review of the Season, and other'
timely numbers make up the literary
part of the book
Complete information on both
squads, which is the reason for the is-
suance of the program, is supplied in
measures that give the readers prac-
tically all information that they wish
about both squads.
GERMANY 1SURRENDERS
19 HADDONALSUBS
ANGLO-AMERICAN SHIPS ESCORT
HUN HIGH SEAS FLEET
TO ENGLAND
(By the Associated Press)
Edinburgh, Scotland, Nov. 21. -
Germany's high seas fleet, after its
surrender to the Allied navies, was
brought to the Firth-of-Forth to-
day.
The British grand fleet and five
American battleships, and three
French war ships, in two long col-
umns escorted the 81 German vessels
to their anchorage.
Harwich, England, Nov. 21. - An-
other flotilla of German U-boats sur-
rendered today to a British squad-
ron. There were 19 submarines in
all-the twentieth, which should have
come today, broke down on the way.
The names of the battleships, bat-
tlecruisers and light cruisers which
have been surrendered to the Allies
have not been announced officiall?
However, a telegram received in Am-
sterdam from Berlin Sunday gave this
list:
Battleships - Kaiser, 24,113 tons;
Kaiserin, 24,113 tons; Koenig Albert;
24,113 tons; Kron Prinz Wilhelm,
25,000 tons; Grosser Kurfuerst, 25,-
293 tons; Bayern,+28,000 tons; Koe-
nig, 25,293 tons, and Friedrich der
Grosse, 24,113 tons.
Battle cruisers - ) Hindenburg,
about 27,000 tons; Derflinger, 28,000
tons; Seydlitz, 25,000 tons; Moltke,
23,000 tons, and Von der Tann, 18,-
800 tons.
Light cruisers-Bremen, 4,000 tons;
Brummer, 4,000 tons; Frankfurt,
5,400 tons; Koeln, tonnage uncertai;
Dresden, tonnage uncertain, and Em-
den, 5,400 tons.
REGISTRAR HALL LEAVES FOR
NORTHWESTERN CONFERENCE

Dr. Arthur G. Hall, registrar of the
University, left yesterday afternoon
for Evanston, Illinois, where he will
attend a conference of registrars
from the larger colleges of the mid-
dle west, to be held at Northwestern
university. The problems arising
from the military organizations in
the various colleges will be discuss-
ed.

U. S. NAVY, RUSSIA,,
ARMIES MAY
RELIEF

ANI) ALLIED
' LOSE

WAR WORK 'TO BE
DISCONTINUED IF
CAMPAIGN'FA1L~

CAMPUS SUM $15,793; NOT
HALF OF QUOTA RAISED
S. A. T. C.'s Average Subscription
$4; 155 Pledges Made Yes-
terday
New York, Nov. 21. - Official fig-
ures on the total subscription for the
United War Work campaign will be
withheld until "continuation drives'
are planned by New York, Chicago,
and other cities which failed to make
their quotas, was reported by John
R. Mott, director general of the cam-
paign.
The last total announced was $158,-"
565.58 and Mr. Mott declared that
unless the minimum goal of $170,500,-
000 was passed, the seven war relief
organizations would be compelled to
discontinue their owrk in the Unit-
ed States navy as well as the work
among the men of the French and
Italian armies. "It also would be
necessary," he said, "to foresake Rus-
sia at the very time help was most
needed."
The "Come Back" mass meeting
awoke the campus to the extent that
the amount reached was more favor-
able than was expected by the com-
mittee. Many came to Lane hall to
make pledges, and some to make ad-
ditions to the pledges they had already
made. Twelve teams went out Wed-
nesday night enthusiastically, and had
good results. The main difficulty has
been that aboat 20 civilian men have
left no record of their address on
their registration cards, and it has
been impossible for the committee to
reach them. Those whose addresses
are not recorded ,should come to Lane
hall and make their pledges.
Yesterday $734.05 was pledged in
the United War Work campaign. Four
women, the only four to contribute
averaged $6 each. The total number
of contributors was only 155.
No naval unit men were on yester-
day's list but the S. A. T. C. men aver-
aged over $4 perman which is more
than the general average among the
military men. The grand total last
evening was $15,793.78.
The booth used in the campaign are
to be used by the War Camp commun-
ity service on Saturday as information
bureaus. They are to be left in the
respective positions at either end of
the campusand are especially for the
benefit of the many visitors in the
city for the M. A. C. game.
A cleanup is . planned for today;
every civilian man will be given an
op'portunity to do his part. Voluntary
contributions will still be received at
Lane or Newberry halls, or at the
Y. W. C. A. headquarters in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
At the dinner held Wednesday night
at Lane hall for the committees, Mr.
Francis Stifler and Mr. N. C. Fetter
gave a demonstration of how to so-
licit. The former stated that he had
given to other things, as the liberty
bond campaign, that he had pledged'
elsewhere, and that the war was over,
but Mr. Fetter over-rode all his ob-
jections and pinned him down with
(Continued on Page Four)
FRESHMEN, NOTICE!
Several more freshmen are
needed for the business staff of
the Gargoyle. A member of the
staff will meet all applicants at
the office at 2:30 o'clock today'
in the Press building

Lyman Rupp.
Freshmen laws- President,
Stephenson; vice-president, E.
erine Kilpatrick; secretary, M.
treasurer, C. Shutter.
Senior engineers-President,
Cooper; vice-president, T. C.
rett; secretary, W. E. Groves;
urer, H. Josey.

H. H.
Kath-
Rose;
R. S.
Gar-
treas-

Junior engineers - President, D.
Knight Merrielees; vice-president,
William Frazer; secretary, Frank
Pease; treasurer, Kershaw Harms. A
Student councilman will be elected at
another meeting.
Sophomore engineers-President, E.
Dillon; vice-president, C. M. Spauld-
ing; secretary, L. A. Gaines; treas-
urer, C. N. Johnson; sergeant-at-arms,
R. Marshall.
Freshman engineering nominations
'resulted with Van Patten and Flinter-
mann for president, Abbot and Dow
for vice-president, Whitsell and Smart
for secretary, and Curtiss and Jordan
for treasurer.
Senior dents-President, H. E. Bar-
rows; vice-president, R. K. Brown;
treasurer, C. T. Nelson; secretary,'
Frank Nesbit.
Junior dents-President, L. J. Por-
ter; vice-president, M. W. Frost; sec-
retary, C. J. Clemo; treasurer, Lobbe.
Sophomore dents - President, D.
Bellinger; vice-president, R. P. Car-
(Continued on Page Four)

Pi

a:

t

On Sale
Everywhere
Friday
Price 25c

HURRY UP
OFFICIAL ATHLETIC PROG
ForTheMICHICAN W MiA
Individual Pictures of Every Man Squad Pictures C
Snappy, Humorous and Serious Stories

GET YOUR

On SaleI

RAM

ANNIL

L. .Came
Dope on this Year's Champions

Everywhere
Friday
Price 25c

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan