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November 20, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-20

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THE WEATHER
COOL AND CLOUDY
TODAY

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augk

ASSOC1ATED
PRESS
DAY A1;ND l'r UT
SIt V ICE

...........

VOL. XXIX. No. 43. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1918.-# PRICE THREE CENTS
r

WILSONDISJCUSSES
FREEDOM OF SEAS'
WITH SENATORS
AMERICAN HEAD TO ESTABLISH
QUARTERS AT U. S.
EMBASSY
PRESIDENT TO INFORM
CONGRESS BY WIRELESS
Different Boards to Act In Capacity of
Reconstruction Commission in
This Country

ROF. W. GO RDO N
STONER NOW MAJOR
Word has been received attthe dean
of the law school's office that Prof.
W. Gordon Stoner, of the law depart-
ment, has been promoted to major in
the Motor Transport service of the
United States army, and that Capt.
Thomas F. McDonald, '17L, has re-
ceived the commission of major in
the Field artillery. Major Stoner was
given leave by the University last
year.
Donald F. Geddes, ex-19L, has been
made ensign in permanent comple-
ment in charge of the port battery on
the Battleship Missouri.

'COME BACK' MASS
MEET STIMULATED
WAR WORK PLEDGES
REEV. C. EMERSON OF DETROIT
GIVES STIRRING TALK ON
CONDITIONS ABROAD
J. FRED LAWTON, '11,
TEACHES SONG HIT

Many More Students Subscribe
Campaign Drive. Soliciting
Committees Appointed

to

CLASS ELECTIONS WILL
BE HELD THURSDAY P. M.

(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 19.- Democratic
. senators who conferred with Presi-
dent Wilson tonight for two hours left
the White House with the impression
that the President now plans to re-
main in France indefinitely or until
the major part of the peace confer-
ence has been completed.
The President was understood to be
especially interested in. the framing
of the treaty as it applies to the prin-
ciple of the freedom of the seas, which
he enunciated in his 14 terms, and on
which the Allies, in agreeing to dis-
cuss peace with Germany, have re-
served the right to freedom of action
at the peace conference.
Wilson Discusses League of Natios
served the right of freedom of action
was another subject to which the
President was said to have given
much study. He was understood to
regard this as essential for the main-
tenance of the peace of the world.
During his absence from the United
States the President plans to continue
to exercise all the functions of his of-
fice. He will keep in communication
with Washington by wireless at sea,
and by cable, and if necessary by dis-
patch boats, while he is- abroad.
President to Keep in Touch with U. S,
While in France the President was
said to plan transaction of any nec-
essary executive business from the
American embassy. Technically he
would then be on American soil.
Should he visit London or any Allied
quarters, the embassies there would
become his executive quarters.
Besides discussing the plans for his
trip abroad, the President was under-
stood to have taken up with the sen-
ators problems of reconstruction and
necessary legislation.
It is said that he opposes creation
of a reconstruction commission, either
executive or congressional, preferring
that the work be done by existing
agencies such as the war industries
board, the food administration, and
the war trade board.
Freshmen Spread
Committees Named
On Monday evening the members of
the freshman spread committee met
at a supper at the home of Dean Myra
B. Jordan to discuss plans for the
38th annual freshman spread, which
will probably be held on Dec. 13.
The freshman spread is given every
year by sophomore girls in honor of
the freshmen. All University women
are always invited to attend. Lois
DeVries, '21, was appointed chairman
and Gladys Reineke, '21, treasurer, by
the committee. Following are the
names of girls who were appointed
to the various sub-committees: Ac-
counting, Gladys Reineke, chairman,
Elinor Leonard, and Helen Kolb;
printing, Alice Comlossy, chairman,
and Elizabeth Roberts; favors, Helen
Master, chairman, Irma Schreiber,
and Dorothy Dunlap; invitations.
Alice Beckham, chairman, Evangeline
Parker, Dorothy Hollis, Ethel Apfel,
Esther Pafenbach, and Monetta
Goetz; refreshments, Carol Heysett,
chairman, Roberta Berry, Alice Hus-
sey, Clara Tubbs, and Cornelia Clark;
music, Esther Hollands, chairman, and
Dixie England; chaperons, Marguerite
Clark, chairman; decorations, Marcel-
la Moon, chairman, Marjorie Lee
Post, Helen Butler, and Quinneth
Summers; badges, Martha Seeley,
chairman, and Elizabeth Payne.
Members of these committees will
meet to discuss plans further at 4:30

o'clock Friday afternoon in the Wom-
en's league room in Barbour gymna-
sium.

ARRANGEMENTS MADE FOR
LISTED MEN TO
ATTEND

EN-1

Class elections will be held at 4:30
o'clock Thursday afternoon at the fol-
lowing places: Lits-Freshmen, Aud-
itorium, U. hall; Sophomores-Chem-
istry building, room 165; Juniors-
room 101, Economics building; Se-
niors--Tappan hall.
. Engineers: Freshmen - Natural
Science Auditorium; Sophomores -
room 348, Engineering building; Ju-
niors -West Physics hall; Seniors -
room 311, Engineering building.
Medics: Freshmen-East Lecture
room, third floor, Medical building.
Law: Freshmen - room C, Law
building; Juniors-room D; Seniors-
room G.
Pharmics: All classes meet in room
151, Chemistry building.
Homeops: All meet at the hospital
Dents: Freshmen -Amphitheater,
Dentistry building; Sophomores-Ju-
nior lecture room; Seniors-Museum,
first floor Dentistry building.
Architects: room 411,. Engineering
building; Sophomores-room 401; Ju-
uiors--room 402; Seniors-room 220.
Arrangements have been made to
enable enlisted men to attend.
Everything There
But T'he Coo ties
This rain hasn't even the excuse
of being good for the corn; in fact,
pluralize the vegetable and the signal
corps men will swear it's bad for
them. Since their officers have made
mudsuckers of them, the signal corps
men say their corns are something
awful.
You see, it's this way: The war is
over, and all that, and peace reigns
and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are soon go-
ing to Paris, and it is predicted that
soon Washington will see some new
styles in millinery, and Fritzie .is
marching home again, hurrah; but the
signal corps men are still digging
trenches on Observatory hill to form
a first line ofs defense against any
raids from Ypsilanti, it is presumed.
The trenches are very trenchy, reg-
ular Empey-Peat trenches; full of
water and mud and-and e1erything
It is nasty and cold and vah-ry damp
in those trenches, say the diggers.. It
is bad enough to stay in them long
enongh to dig them. But that isn't
the worst. After they quit digging
and go back home, they have to wait
outside their barracks until their
shoes get all dried out. Everybody
knows just how nice it is to have
dried, stiff shoes on feet that have
any tendency to develop corns. In
view of these things, the signal corpsj
men say they could dispense very nice-
ly with the rain.
MARTHA COOK WOMEN TO HOLD
BAZAAR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Among other things of note to hap-
pen this week-end besides the M. A.
C. game is a bazaar to be given by
Martha Cook residence for the bene-
fit of the Red Cross. All University
men and women are invited to at-
tend, Friday afternoon and evening
and all day Saturday. For severall
weeks the girls have been working
on articles to be sold at the bazaar
and it is expected that there will be
things to attract everyone's interest.
There will be refreshments and danc-
ing both days and a number of out-
of-town guests are to be present oni
Saturday.

(By the Associated Press)
New Yrk, Nov. 19. - Thirty-two
states have gone over the top and
six passed the 60 per cent mark when
the United War Work entered on its
last 24 hours'-stretch. With $157,-
295,058 in contributions officially tab-
ulated and today's returns yet to be
added, officials were confident that
the fund would pass the original quo-
ta of $170,500,000 and closely ap-
proach the $250,000,000 mark at which
the actual needs o the seven war
relief organizations during the period
of demobilization have been placed.
Word went out tonight to leaders
on the drive in all parts of the coun-
try to "keep the ball rolling" until the
drive closes officially tomorrow at
midnight.
The "Come Back" mass meeting
held yesterday in Hill auditorium
started off with a cheer led by J. Fred
Lawton, '11, and ended with pledges
by most of those present who had not
upheld the campaign to contribute to
the fund and put Michigan over the
top. Mr. Lawton from the first yell
he led got the interest and enthusiasm
of the audience and held it until the
most reluctant had pledged. Both
the S. A. T. C. and naval unit bends
were there and played for the first
time as one unit. Mr. Theodore Har-
risop led the singing of Abraham
Gornetzky's S. A. T. C. song, after
which Mr. Lawton addressed the stu-
dents with his repertoire of stunts
and jokes, and taught them the cam-
paign song, "You Haven't Sacrificed
at All." Two stunts he taught them,
the Mob Scene and the Giant Sneeze,
were entirely new to the men, and the
response he received was unanimous.
Ruth Dailey, '19, then presented the
question to the girls, and made an
appeal to their side of the campaign.1
Following her, Herman August, gave
a short harangue in an attempt to in-
flame the audience to actin. Rev.
Charles Emerson, rector of the Wood-
ward Avenue Congregational church,
of Detroit, was the next speaker. Dr.
Emerson has been in France during
the last six months, and was able to
tell of the things and conditions he'
witnessed there with a tenseness thatt
was gripping. "Men, money, and mate-<
rials are needed," he said, "but moret
important than any of these is mor-
ale. It has three-fourths the value
of any of these other things."i
After the meeting, many who wish-
ed to pledge were forced to leave
without doing so because of lack ofr
time.I
Immediately afterward the solicit-c
ing committee met at Lane hall,e
where they were served with din-I
ner and discussed methods of solicit-I
ing all those who had not yet pledged.t
Members of this committee are as
follows: Charles R. Osius, Jr., '18,
chairman; Milner Ballard, '20; Robert
McCandless, '21; and A. W. Brown,
'20. Soliciting will begin today, and1
this evening a dinner for all teamsE
will be held at Lane hall. Every-c
one who can help in clerical work is
asked to come to Lane hall between
1 and 6 o'clock today.
THAT HOME TOWN NEWSPAPER s
NOW ON FILE AT THE "Y"t
Newspoers from the students'i
home towns have been arranged for
by the army and navy Y. M. C. A. TheyF
are put on file at 2 o'clock daily at
Lane hall and Newberry hall and canr
be read there at any time. Practi-t
cally all sections of the state are rep- i
resented.I
Influenza Situation Improves q
Lansing, Nov. 19.-The influenza sit- g

cation showed a slight improvement a
in reports to the health board this t

CAPTAIN VAUGHAN
SENT TO COLUMBUS
Capt. Bedford E. Vaughan, who ha
been in complete charge of the medi
cal and sanitary work of the S. A
T. C., will leave tomorrow and will
within a few days, go on duty in Co-
lumbus, Ohio.
"An ounce of prevention 'is worth
a pound of cure" has been his work-
ing motto and is evidently a good one
for recent statistics show that the
number of sick men and, the deaths
resulting from influenza was much
lower proportionally than in almost
any army camp. The sick rate be-
fore the epidemic was comparatively
nothing under Captain Vaughan's
care
tAST HUN STRAGGLERS
LEAYE BRUSSELS TODAY
BELGIANS POSSESS FIVE WEEKS'
FOOD SUPPLY; SCARCITY
OF CLOTHES EVIDENT
(By the Associated Press)
Ghent, Nov. 19.-The last stragglers
of the German forces are passing out
of Brussels this evening. It is a sad
cavalcade of sullen, depressed men fil-
ing out along the road, heading for
Lovain and Liege. Brussels is calm.
The population is refraining from any
manifestation bey'ond . disdainfully
shouting the departing soldiers "to
Berlin." The soldiers do not respond,
merely smiling sadly.
Thei correspondent, who went to
Brussels Friday, returned here to-
night. At Brussels he receiveda great
ovation from the inhabitants, which
was somewhat embarrassing as desul-
tory machine gun and rifle firing was
still going on. He was charged sev-
eral times by members of the sold-
iers' and workmen's representatives
for his passports.
There is sufficient food in Belgium
for five weeks, according to the
American commission for relief in
Belgium. Coal is very scarce and
selling at 250 francs a ton. Clothing
also is lacking.
While the people Sunday remain-
ed calm, waiting until the last German
leaves, Belgium lancers are 10 miles
down the Ghent road waiting for the
signal to enter the city. It is proba-
ble that Brussels will be free of the
enemy at dawn tomorrow.
The Germans made attempts to fra-
ternize with the Belgian Socialists,
but Secretary Ruysbreck, at the So-
cialist headquarters, refused to meet
representatives of the soldiers' and
workmen's council.
Victoryf ulletins
With the American arwy of occupa-
tion, Nov. 19.-Well within Belgium,
and within a few hours' march of the
German frontier on the south, Major-
General Joseph T. Dickman's army
gathered itself today for another jump
into evacuated territory.
London, Nov. 19.-A report that an
airman has bombed the palace in Hol-
land, in which the former German
crown prince is interned, is publish-
ed in the Telegraf of Amsterdam. This
report, however, is denied by the cor-
respondent of the Associated Press in
the Dutch capitol.
Zevenaar, Holland, Nov. 19.-The

German minister at the Hague, and
"Queen's commissioner," have arrived
here in anticipation of the coming of
Augusta Victoria Hohenzollern, wife
of the former German emperor. Her
whereabouts at present is unknown.
Copenhagen, Nov. 19.-Soldiers re-
turning home from the front are re-
sponsible for riots at Baden and Wur-
temburg. They are plundering shops
and farms. The peasantry is organ-t
izing patrols to protect property.
Baker Releases Miners from Service t
Washington, Nov. 19. - Immediate
release from the army of men in
training in .this country, who prior to
their induction into military serviceI
were anthracite coal miners, has beeni
ordered by Secretary Baker at the re-
quest of the fuel administration. Ur-
gent need for increased production of
anthracite coal led to the' issuing oft
the order, the fuel adminstrator an-I
nounced tonight.E

"It's a mighty cheap brand of pat-
t riotism that contents itself with mak-
ing a racket," says Rev. Lloyd Doug-
las. "The United War Work cam-
paign on the Michigan campus, is
meeting with poor success. Booths
have been receiving subscriptions all
last week. Only a small amountwas
pledged. Michigan was asked to raise
$40,000. It is a huge sum, but no
! more than her share. Other colleges
and universities are coming through
in fine style. Michigan hasbpledged
$13,000. The campaign is all but over.
Two days more. Shall Michigan ask
Syracuse and Cornell and Chicago to
oversubscribe, to make up her inabil-
ity to raise her quota?
"Civilian students at Michigan have
pledged practically nothing," continu-
ed Reverend Douglas. "By what pro-
cess of reasoning do they excuse
themselves from this duty? Does the
fact that they were unable to get into
the game, anywhere, debar them from
lending a hand to the people who
saved their hides for them?
"Here is the situation: .Seven great
agencies, authorized by the govern-
ment to provide our fighting forces
with creature comforts, are out for
one fund sufficiently large to conduct
their work for the year. The people
who lead these movements had enough
faith in the loyalty and generosity of
the American public to continue their
work, even after they had exhausted
their resources. They knew that
warm-hearted Americans would be so
thankful over the great victory that
they would want to do anything-ev-
erything-to dhow their appreciation,
"If the soldiers get home, safely,
these people will go down tothe rail-
road station and make no end of a
clatter, and weep, and howl, and wave
flags. But, if the soldiers don't get
home safely, these people will not
care much. They will have had their
lives and property saved; and noth-
ing else matters.
"Come on, now! Put this thing
across! If the red, white and blue;
and the yellow and blue, mean any-
thing-now's the time to do busi-
ness!"
S. A. T. C. Boxers
Hold FastWBouts
The results of the boxing at the
Y. M. C. A. last night were as fol-
lows: Osborne, 120 lbs, Co. 3, beat
Sowles, 120 lbs. Co. 1. Bart, 159 lbs.,
Co. 4, fought a draw with Macgraw,
167 lbs., Co. 3. Wood, 160 lbs., Co.
4, beat Dareal, -40 lbs., Co. 3. Cook,
t50 lbs., Co. 1, beat Smith, 150 lbs.,
Co. 3."
The best bout of the evening was
the wind up between Cook and Smith.
It was a scrap from start to finish
and both the boys showded that they
had been in the ring before.
Dareal, the loser in the semi-wind
up, is a professional scrapper and
showed up well. Although he was
outweighed by 20 pounds and out-
reached, he put up a plucky and sci-
entific scrap.
The remaining bouts were more like
tea-parties than fights, as the boys
stood and held hands through three
rounds of agony to the spectator.
U. S. to Send 18,000 Back Soon
London, Nov. 19.-The first Amer-
ican troops to depart homeward, as
the result of the signing of the arm-
istice, will be 18,000 men stationed in
England. The American army ex-
pects to start thefirstashipload of
these soldiers within a week, and to
have all the men on their way back
to the United States 10 days later.

Fire Destroys U. S. Transport
Washington, Nov. 19.-Destruction
by fire of the army transport Ophoir,
in the harbor of Gibraltar, Nov. 11,
with the loss of two members of the
crew, was announced by the navy de-
partment. The vessel was en route
to Marseilles, France, with army sup-
plies, which also were lost. The fire
started while the shin was ats e

All

'Dig Noise, Little
Do" On Campus

TIME THUS FREED TO BE G
OVER TO ACADEMIC
WORK
DRILL INSTRUCTIONS
CONTINUE AS BEF(

Minor Details Conflicting
University Exercises Elim-
inated

Reorganization of the S. A.

will begin immediately, the new plan
to take effect about Dec. 1. President
Harry B. Hutchins has received a tel-
egram from the authorities in Wash-
ington permitting dropping of much
of the military :work, and several of
the compulsory military courses, with
the exception of the war aims course.
This will allow the student soldiers
the opportunity to spend considerably
more time in academic work and less
in learning the theory and practice of
war.
The courses which are to be drop-
ped from the curriculum are:.military
law, law, surveying and map making,
map reading and navigation, and mod-
ern ordinance. These will be dis-
continued at the end of the present
quarter. The time formerly taken up
with these courses will be occupied
with other academic work, and the
men in the S. A. T. C. will be able
to devote themselves to studies which
will benefit them in later life.
Men Desire More Education
Military work will continue as at
present but will be restricted to 11
hours a week. Whenever the army ex-
ercises interfere with the academic
work, the former will be made to give
way to the latter. The more trifling
details which now compose a large
part of the military activ'ty will be
largely done away with. This change
will in no way disrupt the present fl-
nancial arrangements between the war
department and the University.
The students of the S. A. T. C. are
at the present time anxious to have
a change from the existing system.
Many of the men in the corps enter-
ed the school for the first tme this
fall, taking advantage of what they
thought to be an opportunity to re-
ceive an education. Their desire was
to obtain as much learning as possi-
ble, and they found that their mili-
tary work interferred constantly with
their academic pursuits.
- To Drop Detail Work
Owing to the epidemic of influenza
the organization of the corps was but
recently achieved, and even now con-
siderable of the student's time is tak-
en up in various detail work. Under
the new regime this will be all chang-
ed. The student will no, longer be
bothered with the outside work, but
will find it possible to accomplish
something in a scholastic way.
The permit, which was received by
President Hutchins, was received like-
wise, by every other institution s of
learning which has a Students' Army
Training corps. This will cause con-
siderable trouble to the various uni-
versities and colleges, but will allow
many thousands of men an opportu-
nity to receive a much desired educa-
tion.
At the present time particularly,
with the war over and chances to
have duty overseas, or a transfer to
an officers' training camp, entirely
gone, there is no incentive for the
men to work in a military way. This
change will affect the spirit in such
a manner that the lesser amount of
army training will be practically as
effective as is the present amount
under the existing order.

IVEN
ARE
With
T. C.

WASHINGTON ORDER STATES SI A.T. C.
TO DECIDE DROPPING ARMY SUBJECTS,
WITH EXCEPTION OF WAHRAIMS COURSE

FOOTBALLS RECEIVED

A consignment of footballs
has been received by the army
and navy Y. M. C. A. for the
use of the men in the bar-
racks. Army and navy men
may borrow them. free of
charge by signing up for them
at Lane hall.

evening.

ii

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