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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 19, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAl Y

TUESDAY,

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THFS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ublished every morning except Monday
ink the university year by the Board in
tXl of Student Publications.I
MBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESSI
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
ths credited to it r not otherwise credited
ts paper and also the local news pub-
*d herein.
mtered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter.
ubscnptions by carrier or mail, $.5.
7fixces; Ann Arbor Press Building.
hones: Business 960; Editorial, 44.
Komnunications not to exceed 300 words,
igned, the sinature'not necessarily to ap-
r in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
fiSe of events will be published in The'
ly at the discretion of the Editor, if left
r availed to the ofice.
s igned communications will receive no
sideration. No manuscript will be re-
ded unless the writer incloses postage.
le Daily does not necessarily endorse the
timents expressed in the communications.
dred C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
-old Makinson..........Business Manager
ries R. Osius, Jr............City Editor
guerite Clark............. .ight Editor
ee C. J.Martin.........elegraph Editor
eph A. Bernstein.............Sport Editor
cent H1. Riorden.........Military Editor
rtha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
k K. Ehlbert............Associate Editor
rand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
es L. Abele........Publication Manager
nald M. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
rid Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
. REPORTERS
ia Apel John Kyser
caret Christie Herman Lustfield
fl Dailey Philip Ringer
e Ellis " Bowen Schumacher
ila Hains Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Wi. A. Leitziger
rUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1918.
Issue Editor-E. D. Flintermanln
CHEAP
ichigan is failing conspicuously
ong the other colleges and univer-
es of the state and nation on the
r Work campaign. Unless she
nes back strong during the next
r days her failure is going to' be-
e Irredeemable. She will be a
.ghing steck wherever the results
the campaign are discussed and
t will be everywhere. The smaller
leges of Michigan in several of
ich each student has contributed
much as every five Michigan stu-
its, will exult and advertise their
remacy to the high schools of the
te. In short, Michigan, for once
her existence, is going to look
ap and feel cheap unless she real-
' it in time and goes over the top
h a bound.
What's more, this kind of a failure
cheap. Men who have offered their
os to their country now find them-
yes unable to give up cigarets for
For this campaign is not alone a
ostion of supplyinig the men in
ance with comforts and recreation.
makes a real difference to the Un-
'I States of America, in its self-im-
sed duty of making the world safe
decency, whether this work con-
ties. If these organizations did not,
the work we would be taxed for it,
it is essential, as none know bet-
than the men who administered
job of ridding France of the Hun.
Mid that job is by no means com-
ted. Every day's news discloses
w_ possibilities whih may keep an
ierican army in Europe for a per-
. of months or years.
Students of Michigan bought Lib-
y bonds to the limit. Was it be-
ase the bonds were a good invest-
nt or on account of the pressure of
blic opinion? It begins to look as
t could not have been a higher mo-,

e.
Vien and women of Michigan! The
rs of sacrifice for the cause are not
er.
ILITARY TRAINING-MORE OR
LESS
After the S. A. T. C. is disbanded
re will probably be a consideration
least of making military training
npulsory with attendance at col-
es and universities. It is hard to
3phesy whether any such ruling
1 ever go into effect, but it is im-
abable that anything more than an
ir or two of training each day will
required. Military men and some
ters might consider this insufficient
t would it not be all that is desir-
able in connection with college
rk? Is strict military discipline
th its attendent develo ents of
aracter the most desirable for col-
e students?
Viliitary training develops a ; eon
ysically and in a certain way ien. -
y. But on the other hand do
e opportunity for development
ginality and initative? First year
n and women come to school with
ir previous home or perhaps board-
school training. In either case
y have been under more or less
ict surveillence. In most cases
dr whole mode of life has been reg-
ted for them' and they have had to
y upon themselves very little. Even

a great part of their thinking has been
done for them. They usually have ac-
cepted .axiomatically the teachings of
their parents or instructors. This is
without doubt a necessary state of af-
fairs until a boy or girl reaches a cer-
tain age but is it necessary to con-
tinue strict regulation and discipline
after they begin their college work?
Under a military regime the same
kind of training continues. Nearly
everything is regulated for those who
live under it. Their eating, sleeping,
studying,- andhrecreation hoursare
planned for them and they are forced
to comply. In fact, there is scarcely
anything that they do that they can
decide for themselves. One of the
general orders for sentinels is a typ-
ical expression of the military spirit:
"In any case not covered .)y instruc-
tions I will call the corporal of the
guards."
Military training and discipline in
college would undoubtedly develop
precision and alertness. But would it
not also tend to instil that subordina-
tion which is necessary to control of
an army but which, carried too far
into civilian life, is undesirable? It
would develop leadership among a
few, but the kind of leadership requir-
ed in civilian life requires a great deal
more tact and in general differs so
widely from the qualities requisite to
military leadership that it is doubt-
ful whether the experience would
greatly benefit even these few.
Permission has been granted the
renowned Mr. Hohenzollern to return
to the country of his late residence,
by the soldiers' and workmen's
council, which would seem to indicate
that the rank and file of the German
people have not yet learned to remain
in out of the rain.- j
Certain Chicagoans desiring the
Conference championship to come to
their state for a change, seem to be
attempting the transition through the
power of the pen, rather than by the
ordinary course of having a superior
football team.
Isn't it unusual the way the weath-
er man always picks out the week
ends to water Ann Arhor, and makes
the majority of drill days so delicious-
ly perfect?
Michigan must go over the top on
the United War Work campaign
eventually-why not now?
COLLEGE WOMEN OF DETROIT
COMBINE TWO ORGANIZATIONS
Detroit college women have com-
bined two of their organizations in
the Women's University club of De-
troit with a membership of 400. They
are the Association of Collegiate
Alumnae and the College club. Their
aim is to promote the social and in-
tellectual, intercourse among college
women of the city. Miss Grace Hatch,
former president of the College club,
is temporary chairman of the new
organization, with Miss Mary Farns-
worth as secretary.
SYRACUSE GAME BRINGS LARGE
NUMBER TO HOSTESS HOUSE
The Syracuse football game brought
a crowd of about 200 men to the
Hostess house. The men gathered
there after the game to write and
talk over the victory. Sunday was un-
usually quiet, for since peace , has
been declared relatives have not been
visiting Ann Arbor barracks in such
great numbers. As a rule about 50
,men each day have been taking advan-
tage of the writing tables at the Host-

ess house.
Adelphi to Hear Ensign Simpson, '18
Ensign Jess R. Simpson, ex-'18,
will give a talk to the members of the
Adelphia tonight at their meeting. En-
sign Simpson is an old member of the
Adelphi, and was prominent in public
speaking before entering the service,
having been one of the Adelphi's cup
debaters.
A resolution endorsing the proposed
league of nations will be offered by
Representative Goldstein, and there is
promise of a warm discussion by the
members. All who are not members
are cordially invited to come to the 4th
floor of University hall at 7 o'clock
to hear and to take part, especially
first-year men.
Students Given Typhoid Innoculation
At the University of Kansas the
stadents are all being inoculated
against typhoid fever. This includes
overy student on the campus and is
not an army order to the S. A. T. C.
mmnbers, but a prophylactic treat-
_. nt as the drinking water is found
there to be unfit for use.
Full vi edit is to be given for the
work covered during the first quarter
of the year at the University of Kan-
sas in spite of the vacation made nec-
essary by the influenza epidemic.

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AT THE THEATERS *
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TODAY

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* Majestic-Bryant Washburn in *
* "Till I Come Back to You." *

Womnen
The second of the series of requir-
ed hygiene lectures for freshmen and
entering sophomores will be given at
4:30 o'clock today.
Girls interested in acting as squad
leaders for apparatus work are to see
Miss Wood today or tomorrow.

AT WAHR'S
Waldron's Company
Administration $1.50

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Arcade-Lewis S. Stone in "In-
side the Lines."
Wuerth-Herbert Raulinson in
"SmashingThrough," in 6 parts.
Also comedy.

Orpheum-Closed.

(

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Shubert Garrick, Detroit; "Abe"
Potash and "Mawruss" Perlmut-
ter in "Business Before Pleas-
ure."
Campus Theater, Detroit-"Oh,
Lady, Lady."

AT TIE MAJESTIC

Books and Supplies
in General for
Soldiers and Sailors{

* *

It was a busy night in the editor-
ial rooms of a New York newspaper
recently. Big war news was coming
over the wire, a murder mystery had
just broken and hustle and bustle
was in the air. A young man dashed
up to the city editor's desk. He was
all excitement and appeared to have
a big story.
Suddenly a voice souted "Put more
pep into it," and inquiry developed
that George Walsh had "borrowed"
the newspaper office for staging a
scene of his latest comedy, "On the
Jump," which will be shown at the
Majestic tomorrow and Thursday.
a Little did Charles Ebberts owner of
the Brooklyn National league club,
realize, in 1914, when he released
George Walsh that the young man
would some day be a famous moving
picture star. Walsh went to Brooklyn
after he left Fordham college, where
he was the star football man and all
around athlete. How his athletic
training has helped make him a star
is evidenced in "On the Jump."
On the same program is shown
"How Stars Twinkle Away from the
Studios," picturing Mary Pickford,
Charles Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks,
and all the noted movie stars in their
own homes, proving that even super-
stars are as human as you or I.
AT THE ARCADE
"Inside the Lines," featuring Lewis
S. Stone, will be shown at the Ar-
cade today. Based on the stage play
of the same name by Earl Derr Big-
gers, it contains the same star on
the screen who won golden opinions
from the critics for his work on the
stage. The screen presentation is
even more popular than the stage one
was. Marguerite Clayton is the pretty
heroine. There are so many "spy" and
"mystery" stories now-a-days, that
you will be more than pleased to see
this one with an extremely original
twist to make it different from the us-
ual run. The plot is too good to spoil
by describing it.
S. A. T. C. MAN IS INJURED
WHEN AUTO TURNS TURTLE
Sergeant F. Colby and Corporal A.
Slotnick of Company 16 S. A, T. C..
turned turtle in a machine Sunday aft-
ernoon when just a few miles this
side of Ypsilanti. While attempting to
dodge another machine /cominginthe
opposite direction, they swerved to
the side and skidded from the slippery
road into the ditch.
Two signal corps men were riding
with them and all escaped unhurt ex-
cept Colby,.who suffered a bad cut
in the head. He was taken to St.
Joseph's Retreat and will receover
soon.
Bald Eagles Fly South Over Detroit
Detroit, Nov. 18.-Only twice has
there been recorded the flight south,
over Michigan, of huge flocks of bald
headed eagles, although it is stated
that these birds migrate, just as do
'many other species. Mrs. Etta S.
Wilson, bird scientist of Detroit, re-
ports seeing a flock of 40 eagles fly-
ing south a few days ago. They flew
in 'formation." Mrs. Wilson says
birds migrating appear to have reg-
ularly laid out or decided upon aerial
highways.
Streets and Tracks Rated by Marks
Pittsburgh, Nov. 18. - Grading
streets and giving them marks, as
is done with pupils in the public
schools, is the plan used in the city's
petition to force the Pittsburgh Rail-
way company to spend $626,447 in
track and equipment improvements.
Some of the company's tracks are

graded as low as 30 per cent, this rep-
resenting the worst stretches of road.
The receivers of the company insist
that further increases in fare will be
necessitated if they are forced to Im-
prove their equipment.

The class in playground work will
meet at 12:30 o'clock Wednesday in
Barbour gymnasiuT.
The new order of gymnasium cloth-
ing has come. Girls are to secure
them at once
All girls who have signed up for
social service work at the University
hospital are to call Miss Wanamaker,
social service secretary. Volunteer
work will begin this week, since the
epidemic is over.
Girls interested in making Thanks-
giving cards for the hospital are to
call Miss Hulda Bancroft, '14, in Bar-
bour gymnasium or at 208.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will be at
home to all college women from 3
to 5 o'clock today at 1215 Hill street.
- All girls planning to take basket
ball are to meet at 4 o'clock today in
Barbour gymnasium.
ENGAGEMENT OF ANN ARBOR
GIRL IS ANNOUNCED HERE
Announcement has been made at
the Kappa Alpha Theta house of the
engagement of Mary I. Tinsman, '19,
of Ann Arbor, to Dr. Merle R. Hoon,
'18M ,of Mercer, Pa. Dr. Hoon was
a member of the Phi Chi fraternity
while attending school here, and was
graduated from the University of
Pennsylvania. He is now stationed

QUARRY'S

i

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Have a full supply of

FORMALDYHED FUMIGATOR

The kind that do not destroy
gas fixtures or picture frames
CLEAN UP ON OLD GERMS

S

-See-

Quarry Drug Cos

Prescriptiont Store
COI. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENU
PHONE 308

UE

wP

at the western Pennsytvania hospitat
Pittsburg.
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.

All WINTER HATS as well as FALL included in the
BIG CLEARANCE SALE at the New Millinery Parlor of
STEVENS & PERSHING
618 PACKARD
A fine line of hair goods included in this sale.

La

I

A

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES.

I'

UNCLE SAM SAYS:
"Our people will be wise
and patriotic enough not
to neglect the recreation
necessary to maintain
their efficiency." What do
you say?
See tomorrow's Dailyfor answer

- AT w"".."".

SHEEHAN S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

a

ILI

Her name a2
-ought to be=on
/ihs
~~
Thisa Chritma

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbon and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:1o a.
m., and hourly to 9:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9 :48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make localhstops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p im., 10:5o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. M., 12:20 a. m.
:ro a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m,, to
12:2o a. m.
WAI KINGLOG
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. M.
Phone 1620-R

o +.......* l
i

t

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

May we suggest that you select for
gifts, articles of lasting VALUE-
Which the recipient might otherwise
need to buy.
There is no waste in giving some-
thing which renders years of necessary
service. A HOOVER has the virtue
of enduring value, and its usefulness
is unsurpassed.
THE GOVERNMENT REQUESTS THAT YOU
COMPLETE YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING
AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE.

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Mn Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,00.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORRIL L
Typewrites
T p wiesTp wiigMimeographing l o
Has moved to
Nickels.Arcade Phene 1718
First Floor

MARTIN HALLER

112 E. LIBERTY STREET

MPOOMMMMOMMMIlik

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