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November 19, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-19

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
AND COOLER

rIl b4ir itan

:43 ttl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHRT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 42. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1918. PRICE THREE CE,

WISON TO ATTEND PEACE CONFERENCE;
ALLIES FAILTO SETTLE MEETING DATE;
PRESENT CONGRESS ADJOURNS DEC 2

PRESIDENT TO VISIT BRUSSELS
AND ROME, BESIDES
PARIS
HOUSE COMMITTEES
CUT REVENUE BILL
First Time in History of U. S. That
Head Leaves Country While
Holding Office
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 18. - President
Wilson will attend the opening of the
peace conference. This was announc-
ed tonight officially. He will go im-
mediately after the convening of the
regular session of congress on De-
cember 2.
How long the President will remain
,broad, he himself probably cannot
pay. The time for the convening of
the peace conference has not been
,announced, but the general belief
Mere is that it cannot be assembled
Pefore late in December. If such be
the case the President will be absent
from the country for at least a month
and probably longer.
President May Visit Rome
What plans the President may have
to his trip other than to attend the
opening of the peace conference to
. participate in the discussion among
the representatives of the associated
,nations, 'which will precede it, has
not been revealed. Ie undoubtedly
will be accompanied by Mrs. Wilson,
And it is expected here that besides
visiting Paris, where the peace con-
ference probably will be heldhe will
- go to London and probably to Brus-
sels and Rome.
Mr. Wilson is expected to receive
Abroad a reception such as has been
accorded but few men in public life.
Re will be welcomed as not only the
President of the United States and
the commander-in-Fhief of its army
and navy but also as the champion
pf world democracy.
Premiers Influence Wilson
In visiting Europe the President
will establish two precedents. He
,will be the first chief executive of the
Jnited States to participate in a peace
conference for the settling of issues
growing out of a war in which this
country participated, and likewise he
will be the first president to leave
North America during his term of of-
fice.
In reaching his decision to attend
the peace conference President Wil-
son is understood to be largely influ-
enced by representations from Pre-
miers Lloyd George, of Great Brit-
ain, and Clemenceau, of France, and
other statesmen of the Entente coun-
tries. The principles and terms of
settlements enunciated by the Presi-
dent have been accepted by both the
associated governments and the Cen-
tral Powers as the basis upon which
,peace is to be re-established, and it is
understood that it is for the working
out of-the application of these prin-
ciples that his presence is so earnest-
ly desired by the Allied statesmen.
Washington, Nov. 18.-Adjournment
of the present session of congress
next Thursday was arranged today
by Democratic and Republican mem-
bers of congress.
While congress is adjourned the
senate finance committee will con-
tinue revision of the revenue bill in
accordance with suggestions by Sec-
retary McAdoo, and the house commit-
tees will begin discussing the 1920
appropriation bill. Since the depart-
ment estimates were prepared, with
continuance of the war in view, sharp
reductions in the appropriations are
contemplated by congressional leaders.

FIRE IN BARRACKS -
DOES SLIGHT HARM
Fire starting from spontaneous
combustion called the central depart-
ment to Barracks 21, the Phi Gamma
fraternity house, No. 707 Oxford road,
late last night. Slight damage re-
sulted from water and smoke. The
S. A. T. C. men quartered in the house
returned to it' following the extin-
guishing of the blaze.

European Troubles
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Nov. 18.-Rrepresenta-
tives of a hunger regiment, assembled
in Berlin, have demanded an imme-
diate convocation of a national as-
sembly, according to advices from
that city. The independnt Socialists
have issued a proclamation glorifying
the revolution. It says:
"Politicians, who agreed to the dis-
graceful Brest Litovsk treaty, cannot
blame the Allies if they treat them in
a similar manner."
It appeals to the socialists of the
foreign countries not to be depressed.
Paris, Nov. 18.-At a cabinet meet-
ing today, presided over by Presi-
dent Poincaire, it was decided to ap-
,point as commissioners of the repub-
,lics at Strassburg, Metz, and Colmar,
Georges Marringer, director of the se-
cret service; Monsieur Marman, Pre-
fect of the department of Meurthe et
Moselle, and Monsieur Poulet, re-
spectively.
Amsterdam, Nov. 18.-A provisional
council has been formed at Berlin
under the presidency by Doctor Reis-
ser, head of the Hansa league, for the
organization of civilian committees to
safeguard the rights of civilians and
to support the government. The
council demands an immediate con-
stituent assembly.
London, Nov. 18. - A long wireless
dispatch, signed by Doctor Solf, the
German foreign secretary, addressed
to the American, British, French, and
Italian governments has been picked
up here.
The dispatch asks for elucidation in
"a mollifying sense" of the conditions
of the armistice concerning the left
bank of the Rhine, withoi which "we
shall inevitably advance toward more
,or less Bolshevist conditions, which
might become dangerous to neighbor-
ing states."
Yea! SkinnAy-y&
i'm Tain' It!
That indefatigable spirit of the Am-
erican youth which makes him carry
water to the elefunts and jy-raffes on
circus day was in evidence at the en-
trance to Ferry feld Saturday after-
noon.
"Aw, Mister, let 'm in, he's turn-
ed it a hundred and fifty times; I seen
him when he done it," was the pro-
test that one youngster uttered when
he saw his chances of earning admis-
sion fade into the landscape.
His youthful cohort was over zeal-
ous in his endeavors to gain favor in
the gate-tender's eyes. The rest of
"the bunch"-the ever tardy Skinny
and Homer and others too numerous
to mention - supported the protest
with similar remarks.
The human adding machine in the
kept the turnstile whirling with each
entry. The possessor of the yellow
slips were millionaires in the eyes of
these small fry. So they kept turning
those gates in an endeavor to gain ad-
mittance to see at least one play by
their idols, THE TEAM.
One doubts that Michigan spirit will
die when these kids will work so hard
for so small a remuneration. What
men of Michigan they are in the mak-
ing!
LT. TOM McALLISTER, EX-'1,
OF FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION
RECEIVES CROIX DE GUERRE

According to word received here
yesterday, Lieut. Tom McAllister, ex-
'18, of Grand Rapids, has been dec-
orated with the croix de guerre. He
was one of the best night editors that
the Michigan Daily ever had and left
college to enlist in the famous For-
eign Legion of France at the begin-
ning of the war.
He is the second Michigan Daily
man to be decorated with the Croix
de Guerre. The other was Lieut.
Clarence F. Fishleigh, '17E, former

A WORD FROM THE PRESIDENT
I TRUST THAT THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
WILL SO FAR AS POSSIBLE ATTEND THE STUDENT WAR
WORK MASS MEETING TO BE HELD AT 4:30 O'CLOCK THIS
AFTERNOON IN HILL AUDITORIUM. THE CAUSE IN THE IN-
TEREST OF WAICH THE MASS MEETING IS HELD IS OF THE
GREATEST IMPORTANCE. IP MICHIGAN IS TO SUCCEED IN
RAISING AN AMOUNT WORTHY OF THE INSTITUTION, OUR
STUDENTS MUST SUBSCRIBE TO THE EXTENT OF THEIR
ABILITY.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
PRESIDENT.
THE CLASSES OF THE UNIVERSITY WILL ASSEMBLE IN
GROUPS AS FOLLOWS:
SENIORS - ALL COLLEGES-AT THE FIRST FRONT DOOR
TOWARD STATE -STREET.
JUNIORS-AT THE SECOND FRONT DOOR TOWARD STATE
STREET.
SOPHOMORES-AT THE THIRD FRONT DOOR TOWARD
STATE STREET.
FRESHMEN-AT THE FOURTH AND FIFTH FRONT DOORS
TOWARD STATE STREET.
GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS WILL GO IN WITH
THE SENIORS.
WOMEN WILL ASSEMBLE AT THE EAST DOOR, ON ING-
ALLS STREET.

"COME BAECK"MASS
STUDENTlBDI OU'
SLUMP ON UNITE1
Victory A1uletins
(By the British Wireless Service)
Paris, Nov. 18.-It is officially an-
nounced that French troops, lead by
General Petain, will enter Metz to-
morrow. General Castelnau and Gen-
eral Mangin will follow with their
armies.
The entry into Strassburg, which
will be headed by Marshal Foch, will
take place next Sunday and Monday.
(By the Associated Press)
London, (8 P. M.), Nov. 18.-Brit-
ish and Russian forces on Sunday, re-
occupied the Russian seaport of Baku
on the west coast of the Caspian sea,
said an official statement issued this
evening by the war office. The Al-
lied forces were given an excellent
reception, especially by the poorer
classes. The Turks before evacuat-
ing the port looted it.
Basel, Nov. 18.-Prince Gunther, of
Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, a principal-
ity of Germany, at the demand of a
diet, has declared his readiness to ab-
dicate.
Amsterdam, Nov. 18.-A Luxemburg
dispatch says that a chamber today
adopted a motion demanding a. refer-
endum to decide the future form of
government.
The chamber desired that the grand
duchess abstain from all government-
af action pending the referendum.
A motion supported by the Liberals
and Socialists, demanding the abdica-
tion of the duchess and the establish-
ment of a republic, was rejected.
FLIERS TO RECEIVE
U. S. COMM4SSIONS
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 18.-All cadet avi-
,ators now in training in the United
States will be given the option of im\-

SUPPORT OF WAR WORK
DATE STRONGLY URGED
CLERGY, FACULTY AND MILITARY
AUTHORITIES ALL SAY TOO
MUCH CANNOT BE DONE
War Work subscriptions are being
urged by members of the faculty as
well as the campaign committee. Some
of their statements follow:
Major Ralph H. Durkee Says:
"Certainly the work of the agen-
cies joining the United War Work
campaign cannot be too highly en-
dorsed. Their work in the recon-
struction after the war will be of as
great importance as their work has
been in the past in the stricken ter-
ritories and in the home camps. If
human effort can accomplish more
in the future than it has done in the
past, it can only be by the united ef-
fort of agencies."
Rear Admiral I M. Berry
"This laudable and generous en-
terprise will undoubtedly be handled
in the best possible manner by per-
sons of experience who have proved
their efficiency by their well known
work previous to, and especially dur-
ing, the present world war. Reports
have constantly been received of the
good work done at and behind the
lines of the Allied armies. With the
great amount of devastated country
and the destitute population needy
of reconstruction help, whether the
war continues, or not, I join in the
hope that all who can, will join lib-
erally in contributions to the United
War Work fund."
Dean William H. Butts:
"This is the last and most compel-
ling call for our bottom dollar. This
patriotic fund is in many ways the
most important contribution to our
soldiers over there. There are to be
nearly a million of our own men be-
sides vast hordes of released pris-
oners of other nations. For such a
cause the student body, and faculty
will respond heartily."
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne:
"Never has there been a time in the
history of the world that the nation
has needed co-operation as it does
right now in this beginning of peace.
We must give and give liberally. I
am not worried about the German
people. I think they can take care of
themselves, but our allies, Belgium,
Serbia, Greece, and France, are starv-
ing and we must feed them."
Dr. Verner W. Crane:
The War Work campaign is mis-
named now; it should be the recon-
struction campaign. When fighting
was going on, the men were kept up
by the excitement of fighting. Now
with more idle time the morale must
be sustained by the amusements our
money can buy."
Prof. I. L. Sharfman:
"The service rendered by the sev-
en great agencies which have now
combined in the United War Work
campaign has been universally inval-
uable in the maintenance of the mor-
ale of our men at home and abroad.
A continuation of this service is in-
(Continued bn Page Four)

STEPS BEING TAKEN TO
SETTLE S.A.T.C. STATUS

CO-OPERATION WILL BE BASIS
DISBANDMENT OF S. A. T.
C. UNITS

OF

The meeting of educators connect-
ed with the S. A. T. C. is being held
in Washington to decide the status of
the' S. A. T. C. men definitely. It is
thought likely that the short courses
in mechanics that have been given
to section B men will be continued,
without any change. In regard to the
medics, who have long been in doubt
whether or not they would be induct-j
ed into the S. A. T. C., a telegram
was received recently, stating that the
transfer would be optional with tye
students. If they wish to transfer to
the S. A. T. C. they must apply to
the commandant and get a recom-

METINGTOLIFT
T OF DISGRACEFUL
ASSEMBLY TO BE HELD AT 4:3
IN HILL AUDITORIUM TO
AROUSE ENTHUSIASM
ARMY AND NAVY BANDS
WILL PARADE TO HAL
J. Fred Lawton and Other Prominem
Speakers Are Headliners on
Peppy Program
A "Come-Back" mass meeting wi
be held at 4:30 this afternoon in Hil
auditorium to arouse pep for th
United War Work campaign which ha
,so far been a decided failure on th
campus.
Civilians will be the bulk of tb
audience although the naval unit an
the students' army training corps me
will be marched to the meeting i
companies. The principal part of th
main floor has been reserved for th
civilian men. This is the first meel
Ing of the year that has especiall
catered to University men not in th
training units. The first balcony I
reserved for the women, and the bal
ance of the main floor and the secon
balcony will be for the military met
Army and Navy Bands Out
The combined army and navy band
will march through the streets to th
auditorium, where they will play
number of selections. This will b
the first publicappearance of th
combined bands.
No subscriptions or collections wi:
be taken at this meeting as its pui
pose is to arouse enthusiasm and giv
a full explanation of why MichiganW
$40,000 quota must be raised if tb
University is to keep its place amon
universities. The booths will be r
opened tomorrow fo take subscrI
tions. Personal solicitations will b
made % this plan fails.
Lawton to Be There
J. Fred Lawton, '12, of Detroit wi
be the principal speaker. Beside
trying to inspire a little pep into th
students, he will lead some of th
Michigan songs he wrote which mad
him famous on the campus. Mr. La,
ton is a favorite among college st
dents, both present and past, and ne
er fails to win his way into the heart
.of those who have not had the priv:
lege of hearing him before. He is
celebrated imitator of Coach Yos
Harry Lauder and anyone else wort
imitating.° He is a Scotchman, an
his grandfather was knighted by th
king. He has written lyrics fc
Michigan, and while here in the Un
yersity was interested in dramati
and athletics, and on all occasiot
of special interest he has returne
to Michigan to lead the pep. Two stu
deit speakers will also be on the pr<
gram, and Mr. Theodore Harriso:
director of the Varsity Glee club, wi
lead in the singing of Abraham Go:
netzky's new S. A. T. C. song.
(By the Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 18.-Although del
nite reports to date of total subscril
tions to the United War Work fu
will not be available until tomorroi
the national headquarters announc
tonight that it had gone far -beyor
the $129,950,090 that had been pledi
ed up to Saturday night.
Upstate, New York, Connecticu
and Maryland, also raised the figu

more than $3,000,000, while a ha
million college, high, and priva
school students who formed then
selves into a division with a self-a
lotted quota of $2,000,000 reporte
they had gone "over the top."

nmendation from the head of the medi- mediate discharge with commissions

cal school.
Sec. Baker Makes Statement
What policy is to be pursued in the
future in regard to the S. A. T. C. re-
mains unknown. Perhaps the most
definite information that has been giv-
en out yet, was secured by the the
Army and Navy Journal in an inter-
view with Secretary of War Baker.
"The study of the S. A. T. C. is be-
ing made by two sets of people and
when they are completed the results
will be laid before me and I will make
the decision. Dr. Mann and Dean
Snyder on one hand, and the General
Staff Operations section on the oth-
er are studying the question with this
thought in mind: That the thing to
do is to free the colleges as speedily
as possible to get back to their norm l
academic pursuits, without at the
same time disorganizing them by a
sudden stoppage of the special work
they are doing for the government,
leaving them without means to get
back to their normal relations."
Some Units May Be Kept
Sergeant-major Fischer gave the
following as his personal opinion of
the future of the S. A. T. C.: ".En-
ough S. A. T. C. units will be main-
tained throughout the country to give
the men already in the army and who
desire a college education an oppor-
tunity to do so."
However, no definite orders have
been received as yet from the war de-
partment as to the future of the S. A.
T. C. unit.
UNION PLANS GOOD DINNERS
AND HOME ENTERTAINMENTS
FOR YANKS AND TARS HERE
Mr. Frank Bacon of the War Camp
Community service is now busy work-
ing out plans for Thanksgiving home
dinners and entertainments for the
men here, in both army and navy. Of
course these dinners and entertain-
ments will be given only for those
who desire it, but it is expected that
nearly all those who do not leave
town will take advantage of this kind
offer.

or of completing their training. In-
structions to this effect were sent to-
day to all aviation fields and camps
by Major-General Kemley, chief of the
division of military aeronatics.
It was announced that orders had
been issued for the closing of Self-
ridge field, Mount Clemens, Mich.;
Chanute field, Rantoul, Ill., and Scott
field, Belville, Ill., and for the aban-
donment of the air service mechanics'
school at St. Paul.
RESTRICTIONS ON
FLOUR ARE REMOVED
Washington, Nov. 18.-According to
orders from the United States food
administration, white flour can now
be had without the necessity of buy-
ing substitutes. This new order is
not because of the cessation of fight-
ing in France, but because corn and
oats are needed badly to feed cattle
in Europe.
In all continental countries engag-
ed in war, milk has been saved for
the babies and the shortage of.crops
in Europe and the subsequent lack of
fodder, must be made up by the Unit-
ed States.
Sugar allowances will also be in-
creased to four pounds per month per
person, beginning December 1. This
will not be universally observed, ap-
plying only to those states which are
plentifully supplied with the com-
modity, of which Michigan is one.

SENIORS, NOTICE!

Seniors, both men and women
should have their Michiganen-
sian pictures taken this week
or the early part of next week.
Appointments can be made with
the official photographers, Rent-
schler, Swain, Randall, and
White. Late pictures will not
be accepted.

Two Naval Unit Men Leave for Capita
Two men from the naval unit herE
left for gshington on Sunday morn
ing. They were L. E. Benson, gun
ner's mate, second class, and Wesle:
L. Dedrick of the same rank. They
have been transferred to the Nava
Ordnance gun factory at Washing
ton.
DAILY STAFF NOTICE?
The staff meeting of the Dail:
scheduled for this afternoon has beer
postponed because of the War Wort
mass meeting to be. held at 4:30 it
Hill auditorium. The staff will mee
tomorrow.

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