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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL4 NEWSPAPER AT THISE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday+
ring the university year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications.
EMBER OF THE; ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
tches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and also the local news pub-
hed herein.
Entered at the postofiiee at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2424.
Communications not to exceed 300 words,
signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
ar ip-print, but as an evidence of faith, and
atices of events will be published in The
aily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
or mailed to the office.
Unsignedncommunications will receive no
nsideration. No manuscript will be re-
rned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
:htiments expressed in the communications.
ildred C.Mighell........Managing Editor
.arold Makinson..........Business Manager
eGrand A. Ganes....Advertising Manager
gnes L~. Abele...,..... Publication Manager
rank N. Gaethke.......Circulation Manager+
BIJSINESS STAFF
>nald M. Major Howard S. Velleman
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1918.
Night Editor-Herman Lustfield

Wilson. We are beginning to realize
that it is better to have whatever
supply there may be of any essential
commodity within the reach of all,
even though none has all he would like,
than to have high prices stimulate
production, making it possible for the
wealthy to have a plethora of necess-
aries, while the wage-earner finds it
impossible to get any.
We are apt to recall good old Jean
Jacques Rousseau and his dictum that
society exists not for the highest good
of the greatest number,, but for the
greatest good of all. Community ef-
fort is being emphasized, and com-
munity responsibility. Unrestricted ir-
dividualism is being viewed through
the eyes of the less fit por-
tion of the people. We read that
Spanish influenza originates among
the poorly housed and clad denizens
of the river flats, and spreads to the
nabobs on Piety Hill. Piety Hill is be-
ginning to feel, somewhat vaguely as
yet, that if it wants to escape the
epidemic it must see that the river
flats are better protected from ex-
posure. We are answering Cain's
question in the affirmative, and realiz-
ing that in so doing we are blessing
ourselves and saving our country.
When you hear a- man knock Old
Glory swat him where his brains
ought to be and kick him where they
are.
A flag in the heart is worth two on
the pole.--The Fly Paper (A. E. F.)
We notice that the Germans have
given up Lens. Probably because
they saw their finish through it.

THE *WAR VARSITY
Michigan's second war-time foot-
ball team and her coaches are labor-
ing under conditions such as have
never before confronted them. There
is no need of asking support for th'
Varsity for true Michigan men are ai-
ways loyal to their teams. Our op-
p'-nt..nts are trying to develop teams
under ex:.ctly the same conditions and
difficulties. As a consequence visit-
ors to Ferry field this year will not
witness the same perfect machine-like
work, the same quality of individual
playing, and the indications of long
Bard practice.
Football men are not being ex-
empted from any of the tasks their
fellow students in the S. A. T. C.
are required to do but are devoting
the hour and a half allotted for pleas-
ure and personaldutiesto producea
team of which their school can be
justly proud. They are unable to do
their best because of time and their
own physical limits, which makes it
impossible for a man to drill several
hours per day and then play top speed
football for the same length of time.
Most of the students will attend
the game because of the personal
.pleasure they secure. They will also
root because of the American inabil-
ity to keep quiet when a good play is
made or clever headwork shown.
What they are apt to do is to be un-
justly harsh in, their criticism of the
players and prone to judge the work
as a whole by the standards of normal
years. Formerly it was justifiable to
complain if the Varsity was not almost
perfect and greatly above average, for
it was within the limits of possibility
to produce such a team and excuses
were not in order. This year we
should have a Varsity equal to that
of our opponents and able to maintain
Michigan's standing in the Conference.
We must not and cannot expect a
team of a 1907 or 1917 type, when
other schools are either refusing to
put a team into the field because of
lack of material or .are frankly admit-
ting that the teams they have are 50
per cent below par. But we can ex-
pect the same Michigan spirit in the
support which this war Varsity will
receive.
SHARE UP!
The war industries board has regu-
lated the price and quality of shoes.
It will regulate the price, quality and
distribution of all wearing apparel,
Chairman Bernard Baruch has stated.
We have sugar cards, and will soon
have underwear cards or their equiv-
alent. As a matter of fact, big city
department stores are already insist-
ing on the personal history of pur-
chasers of those very necessary gar-
ments and will sell only a limited
number to each purchaser.
This is another blow at the law
of supply and demand, and, as such,
will be feared and deplored by many
authoritative economists, who will
show that such action will reduce pro-
duction and that there will be con-
sequent scarcity of wearing apparel.
But much water has passed under
the mill since the United States be-
gan price and distribution regulation
of necessities, beginning with coal
and wheat. We have had opportun-
ity to observe the effect of price reg-
ulation contravening the. natural law
of supply and demand. From our ob-
servations we can begin to form an
idea of the fundamental principles
on which the President Wilson school
of economists are proceeding. "Had
the price of wheat not been regulated,
bread would have been beyond the
reach of the average wage earner," is
the gist of statements by President

The roosters of Ann Arbor no long-
have any occasion to feel lonesome
when they get up before sunrise.
When the S. A. T. C. gets uni-
forms the photographers will join the
ranks of war profiteers.
And at night the overworked Ann
Arbor police force can stay at home
with his family.
CARUSO'S NEW YORK CONCERT
NETS MILLIONS FOR LOAN
Mrs. Enrico Caruso, bride of the
celebrated tenor who sings October
19 in Hill auditorium, has become her
husband's librettist. At a Liberty Loan
rally last Monday in Carnegie hall,
NI. Y., Caruso sang the verses to Um-
berto Giordano's "Canzone Guerresca."
At this concert seats were given gra-
tuitously to subscribers for Liberty
bonds, the highest subscribers receiv-
ing the best seats. Many people sub-
scribed $10,000 and $20,000 for a seat.
The total amount for the house was
$4,300,000. In many ways this was
considered the most remarkable con-
cert ever heard in this country. Be-
side Caruso, Galli-Curci, John McCor-
mick, and Heifetz appeared on the
program.
Training Camps to Have Golf Links
Chicago, Oct. 4. - The United States
commission on army training camps
has decided to provide golf for men
in training for soldiers, and golf as-
sociations have been asked to pro-
vide cibs, balls and caddy bags for
the camp golfers. The government
will provide the linls.
You will always find satisfaction by
adveritsing in the Daily.-Adv.

MEDICS ARE PTRIOTS
SENIOR DECLARES WASHINGTON
KNOWS BEST ON DRILL QUES-
TION.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The communication that was pub-
lished in yesterday's Daily in re the
problem of medics doing drill needs
only one glance to see that he (or she)
who signed it "A Student" was honest
in that much. We should judge from
the character of the English that the
author was taking Rhetoric 1A to sub
statiate his claim to the title over
which his article appeared.
The medical students have always
held a peculiar relationship with. re-
gard to the campus in general, for the
very reason that it has so far been
donsidered inadvisable by those who
know for them to drill. A medic is
old enough by the time he has qual-
ified to enter the school to be above
some of the high school tricks which
are perpetrated by the students of
other colleges. His work is of such
a character and the hours so long
that he has no time to enter into the
festivities of the campus, the athletic
work, and other things unless he
divides his time. He would have to
do half work to do most of the things
that the students of three or four one
hour courses can do. One good ex-
ample which even "A Student" may be
able to see into is the fact that in
handing out the Union dance ticekets in
the past, medic upperclassmen were
unable to procure any on account of
the late hour at which they left the
hdspital. There are many more such
instances.
Most Medics Enlist
Looking back on the records of the
Medical school our enthusiastic writ-
er can find that fully 90 per cent of
the men in the last four classes of the
school have enlisted,-I said enlisted,
not drafted. The interns at the hos-
pital are all there for just a limited
time as they all'have their applications
in for the service and cannot go until
the men in the present senior class have
graduated and can take their places.
They are holding over some of the
brain fever specialists to take care
of just such cases as the writer of
that most incomprehensible article of
yesterday. The bed is reserved for
him.
A freshman medic who is rarely in
the 19 to 21 class anyhow, has every
morning hour full, the afternoon is
filled wtih a tedious work of standing
up for four hours and a half leaning
over a table. He comes home at night
and studies until the wee sma' hours
and then he cannot cover all of the
assignment competently. In the spring
an extra hour of quiz is added in the
morning, an extra lecture hour at
four, because there is more daylight.
Work All Summer
The present senior class has already
finished three months of its last year
because It voted unanimously to go
right through the summer so that it
might be able to serve its country
earlier.bThe medical faculty consent-
ed to stay here and instruct the men.
It was entirely voluntary. This at-
CUTTING CAFE
$.50 PER WEEK
Transients ServedC
Special Sunday Dinner 50c c
State & Monroe Mrs. C. W. Merkelc

titude characterizes the entire medical
profession and the article that was
so badly written yesterday shows the
unlimited ignorance of some people.
When the time comes tor the medics
to drill and the surgeon-general at
Washington issues the orders, the
medics will be right there when the
roll is called. The problem of the
combination of drill and medical study
that will result in the best medical
preparation for the sake of the boys
in service is still being worked out.
"A Student" will have gray hair by
the time he can see this. Michigan
medics have a reputation that is hard
to beat. They are working for Mich-
igan, they are doing their bit by stay-
ing here and finishing, and if some-
one who hasn't several loose cortical
cells gives the order to drill, they
will do that much more. Adois!
A SENIOR MEDIC.
IX111_en
All women interested in the tennis
tournaments should sign up immed-
iately in Barbour gymnasium.

ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES

Military Books for the S. A. T. C.

WAHR'S

Main St.

State St

1A

Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

We make our own baked goods.

Sophomores who have
ed for their heart and
should do so immediately.

not report-
lung tests

k

The Women's league will hold a
mass meeting at 4 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. All women are urged to be pre-
sent.
Emily Loman, '19, president of the
Y. W. C. A. and Doris McDonald, '19,
president of the Women's league; will
be in their respective offices in Bar-
bour gymnasium from 10:3'9 to 11:30
o'clock Monday, Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday mornings.
Alumnae house, Newberry residence
and Martha Cook building have re-
ported 100 per cent Women's league
cards.
Girls interested in the United States
student nurse reserve may enroll at
the nearest recruiting station of the
Women's committee of National De-
fense at Foster's Art store from 1
to 8 o'clock daily, or at the city
Y. W. C. A. from 7:30 to 9 o'clock in
the evening.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

I

W ahr's University Booksto
TEXT BOOKS and

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL

FOR MEN AND WOMEN

LUNCH, 40 CENTS

DINNER, 50 CENTS
- OR-

BOARD BY THE WEEK: LUNCH AND DINNER, $5.00'

HOME COOKED FOOD

STEVENS & PERSHING
618 PACKARD -
PARLOR MILLINERY

- -
Baptist Gi
- Social Ton
7:30-1(
- ALL INVI
COM
SSignal Corps an
-and -
- A DETROIT UNIT
- Between Detroit, Ann A
- Detroit Limited andI
a. in., 8:o a. m. and hour
Jackson Limited andI
aCa.rL. and every hour to 8:
Save 10 per cent, on your Laundry _ Lal Cars EastBon
a. m., 7:05 a. m. and
7:05 p. m., 8:o p. m, 9
m. To Ypsilanti only-: 8
i To"Sali9n e hngetaYp
Local' Cars West Bound
- ..= m., 10:20 p. M., I 2:o a n
To Jackson and Kalami
No more worn out shirts around neck r 814ai..
-w To Jackson and Lansing.
Sp. mn.
bands by rough collars. Additional Cars to fs
... a~ 2:05 6:o5, 9:45 P. im., is :
I We smooth inside and outside edres. -Iuniversity

uid

right
0:00

TED

E
- Men

E
, Mechani

cs

ED LINES
Arbor and Jackson
i'xpress CIrs-7 .25
rly to B:io p. m. .
lExpress Cars-8:48
:48 p. M.
d5:35 a. m., 6:40
every two hours to
:05 p. M., 10:50 p.
8:05 p. M., 9:50 p.
., : :2o a. m.
,illnti.
d-6:os a. M., 7:48
midnight.
azoo-Limited cars,
g, Limited car, 8:48
iilanti-g So a. in,
:2Q midnight.

Students

We darn your socks, sew on buttons
and do all mending FREE.
All goods washed in soft water.

-y/'I -Y V .. ' .

11

The Army and Navy headquarters
for cleaning and altering uniforms is
situated at the corner of N. University
and Ingalls, where your khaki garments
will receive special atenion by expert
workmen,.al-ca teto yepr
We call for and deliver with
1 Darr -Servie
W, L. SLEDGE, Prop.
Open from 7:oo a. iM to 9:30 p. m.
PUone 273AWE 2T64.
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTHES

;w r

WA KING LOC
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Fhone 160-U

App

314 S. State St.

Ann

I

I1

Liberty and Fifth Avenue
PHONES 2076-2077
OUR WAGON WILL CALL PROMPTLY

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869 -
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources..........$4,000,000.00

Northw
707

Cor. -

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