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October 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
BABLY RAIN
TODAY

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ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W]
SERVICE

I

N. 4.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5. 1918.

PRICE THREE

.Aia'1 V... lY V".. 2"
. '

-.
_ :

LOAN VOLUNTEERS
HAVE LAST CHANCE
FOR HONRBADGE
ANN ARBOR HAD SUBSCRIBED
$981,000 LATE YESTER-
DAY
FOUR MINUTE SPEECHES
MADE AT S. A. T, 2. MESS
IL M. Carson Says Students Are Rich
This Year Having no Ex-
penses
Late volunteers will still have a
chance to bq included in the Fourth
Liberty Loan tomorrow at Newberry
hall. It is to be kept open all day for
the convenience of those who have
been unable to report sooner. This is
the students' last chance to wear the
honor badge.
R. M. Carson, of the publicity com-
mittee, says, "The students are rich
now. The only expense to which they
are subjected is that of books. The
government furnishes them every-
thing else, even amusements. The stu-
dent who starts to save by buying
bonds at the beginning of his train-
ing course will soon find himself
ahead. If he has an investment in
the cause for which he is fighting, he
will believe all the more in it."
An especial appeal is being made to
the men of the students' army train-
ing corps. Four minute speeches are
being made at the S. A. T. C. mess
halls, theatres, Chubb's, Freeman's,
and at the women's dormitories-Mar-
tha Cook and Newberry residences.
Those who have been making four
minute speeches are Mr. Newton C.
Fetter, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A.,
Prof. John R. Brumm, Prof. John C.
Parker, Earl Dunn, '19, N. Earl Pin-
ney, '16, Herman August, '19, Kelsey
Guilfoil, '20L.
The down town office sent out 2,000
letters to people yesterday asking
them to double their subscription
and a great many complied with the
request. Mr. Bassett said that he ex-
pected a rush business Saturday. Yes-
terday the office averaged two sub-
scriptions per minute. The office has
about 40 people helping to take care
of the Loan. It is open from 8:30
o'clock in the morning until 8 at night
and averages from 1,000 to 1,500 sub-
scriptions daily. The first day was the
record breaker; 1,523 people volun-
teered. In case today's trade cannot
be handled in one day the office will
be open Sunday.
The county is divided into nine di-
visions, which to date have subscrib-
ed $1,498,450. The city to date, has
subscribed $931,200. Thirty-five stu-
dents volunteered for the Loan yester-
day.
TURKEY TO REMAIN
ALLY OF GERMANY
(By the Associated Press)
Geneva, Oct. 5. - The provisional
president of Albafia, and former con-
mander-in-chief of the Turkish forc-
es at Scutari, in an interview before
his departure from Saloniki, declared
that Turkey would hold out to the last
minute before capitulating, in the be-

lief that by so doing she would re-
ceive better terms by the Entente al-
lies. He expressed his pleasure at the
fate of Bulgaria, which he said had
thrown in her lot with the Teutonic
Allies through covetous motives.
"As regards Albania," he said, "we
want autonomy as defined by Presi-
dent Wilson with our constitution
based upon the British and American
systems."

YOSTMEN PREgARED
FOR INITIAL GAME

Tour New

Cases

Ready to Duplicate Feat of
Years in Taking Case
Contest

Past

COACH YOST BUILDS STRONG
TEAM DESPITE SHORT HOURS
Case Team to Be Directed by Captain
From Position of Quarter-
Back

1

"Flu" Rep orted
Four new cases of epidemic influen-
za have been reported to Dr. J. A.
Wessinger, health officer of Ann Arbor.
Three of them are students and the
other a child. So far no serious cases
have arisen.
Dr. Wessinger says the malady here
is very mild and that he confidently
believes it will subside within the
next 10 days. His reports for the en-
tire city of Ann Arbor, including all
students of the University, are quite
encouraging. No unusual sickness is
evidenced among the students.
The members of the students' army
training corps are declared to be in
excellent physical condition, according
to Dr. W. E. Forsythe of the Univer-
sity health service. The precautions
already taken have proved very effec-
tive and only a small number have
needed medical attention. The settled
situation of the men in their barracks
has aided considerably to the high rat-
ing of the health standing. The corps
is entirely free from the so-called
Spanish influenza.

W. R. ATLAS, '18<
Opera star and former associate edi-
tor of the Daily, who died of in-
fluenza. '
WALTE R, RKTLS,'18b,
SUCCUMBS TO EPIDEMIC,
PROMINENT GRADUATE DIES OF
SPANISH INFLUENZA AT CAMP
SHERMAN
Walter R. Atlas, '18-ex-'19L, died of7
influenza at Camp Sherman, Chilli-
cothe, Ohio, Friday, October 4 ,after
a few days' illness. He had been in
camp for only six weeks, and was
about to leave for an officers' train-
ing camp when he was taken ill. The
progress of Atlas while in camp was'
rapid. He was in service a week when
he was appointed corporal, and given
charge of the appointment of kitchen
police in the camp.
While in the University, Atlas con-
tributed much to the success of ama-
teur theatrical productions, having.
starred in an annual Union opera,
"Tres Rouge," and taken numerous
parts in Comedy club plays and
Shakespearian productions. He was a
member of the Zeta Beta Tau frater-
nity and Michigan Daily staff, and
manager of the vrsity band in 1916-
17. He hadbeen elected to two hon-
orary societies, Spinx and Griffins. His
home was in Glouster, Ohio.
Uniforms fMay Vie
Issued Next Week
Ispuance of clothing to the students
in the S. A. T. C. will no doubt com-
mence the early part of next week.
Large shipments of clothing are arriv-
ing every day. Members of Section
B, S. A. T. C. are employed in unload-
ing and assorting the material.
Duties of the quartermaster of the
S. A. T. C. have been increased more
than 500 per cent since the first of
September. During the entire sum-
mer the quartermaster department
was accustomed to handling consign-
ments of clothing in dozen lots. To-
day the department deals in carload
and thousand lots.
Since the first of the week two car-
loads of cots have arrived, together
with a carload of bed sacks, and an-
other of shoes. Sizes of the shoes
range from size 6 to 13. Every shoe
from size 6 to 7 is a dress shoe,
while the remainder of the sizes are
marching shoes with rough leather for
uppers.
At the present time there are ap-
proximately 1,500 socks, 2,000 suits,
shirts, leggins, and woolen underwear,
23 bales of overcoats, and 75 dozen
hats in the quartermaster house in
MacMillan Hall on the corner of State
. and Huron streets.

Ready to deal out to the Case foot-
ball men another such drubbing ast
they received last year, the Michigan
moleskinners will trot out . on Ferryt
field gridiron this afternoon in fighting
formation. Yost has overcome diffi-<
culties presenting themselves this1
season, and has a regular "tank" teamI
for attacking action.
Win Last Year
The Wolverines took the bacon from1
the engineers in their last contest in
1917. Michigan overwhelmed them at
that time by a score of 42 to 0. With
five letter men back on the squad this
year, a repetition of the feat would
be -no surprise.
Despite the fact that the men have
been coming out late due to military
matters taking their time, Yost, in
not more than an hour and a half
practice each day, has made a typical
Michigan machine of the bunch.
The Maize and Blue warriors 34
strong gave the coach a hard job in
picking men to start today's contest.
Keen competition for berths on the
Varsity eleven is being noted and
critics are of the opinion that to set-
tle the question of first string men
definitely, Yost will give nearly every
man on the squad a chance in the
game this afternoon.
New Material
With new material being used to a
great extent, the individual players
will attract a great deal of atten-
tion, yet even more so will their team
work be scrutinized. Harmony in ac-
tion will possibly be a big factor In
determining the Varsity men.
With seven Case letter men to
reckon with and considering the pres-
ence of Captain McCune at the helm
of the team, the Case bunch is ex-
pected to show more fight this year
than at any previous time.
Keen interest in Usher's ability at
the game will be manifested and it is
thought that the Sophomore will be
able to spring some surprises in the
game. Clash, another Toledo boy, is
expected to show some brilliant play-
ing, while Abie Cohn at right half is
sure to be a big mainstay.
Case Captain a Star
Vanderhoof playing right half for
Case, a letter man and seasoned vet-
eran, is said to be a bear when he has
(Continued on Page Three)
NEW REGULATIONS
FOR WEST POINT
Washington, D. C., Oct. 4. - Secre-
tary Crowell today approved a recom-
mendation which has long been han. -
ing fire. The recommendation speci-
fies that for the duration of the war
the course at West Point be reduced
from four years to one. It also states
that the present two upper classes
shall be graduated the first of next
month. Immediate benefits of this are
that the army will get several hun-
dred lieutenants now and over 2,000
within a year from now.
MICHIGAN UNION MEMBERSHIP
DANCES START OCTOBER 12
Following out a custom of previous
years, the Michigan Union will start
its weekly Saturday night member-
ship dances on Oct. 12. Attendance
at these dances will be limited to 100
couples, tickets being on sale at 5
o'clock on the Thursday preceding the
parties.

BULGARIAN KING ABDICATES; AUSTRIi
FAVORS PEACE; ALLIES MAKE HUN MV ATO RL0TLFl

* ARMY BAND, NOTICE ~
The Daily has taken it upon it-
self to ask the army band, in be-
half of the student body, to march
to Ferry field this afternoon, and
give the rooters some of the old
Michigan pep songs. "The Vict-
ors" should boom out tomorrow
to let the boys know that we're
all behind them every minute, war
or no war. The students would
appreciate the interest, thus ex-
pressed, of their new college mates,
the army mechanics. Get out the
old drum!
Commissions Open
To All Army Mien
Members of the S. A. T. C. are not
the only ones eligible to try for com-

Germans
Towns

BRITISH SLOWLY FORCE ET
TO STRAIGHTEN LENS.
LILLE LINE
ITALIANS START DR
MOUNTAINOUS F R 0

WILL NOT ESTRBL1SN-
M. P.'SUNTIL NEEDED
NO ORDERS HAVE BEEN ISSUED
REGARDING STAY OF S. A.
T. C. MEN HERE
Information from the headquarters
of the students' army training corps,
states that Military police will not be,
established here unless conditionsj
make it necessary. No step shall be
taken providing 'nothing unusual oc-
curs. Thus far the commandant in
charge here has not had to enforce
any of the more stringent laws. Nev-
erless a close look-out is continually
being kept and anyone disobeying suchr
laws shall be dealt with accordingly.
The commandant's jurisdiction cov-
ers all the territory within a radius
of 10 miles.
Authorities say no orders have been
issued concerning the exact length of
time the members in the different de-
partments of the S. A. T. C. will be
permitted to remain here. Definite in-
formation is expected to be received
in the enar future, but until it is pub-
licly announced no student will know
the duration given him.
GERMAN COUNTER
ATTACKS F A I L E D
(By the Associated Press)
With the British Army in France,
5 p. in., Oct. 5. - There has been fight-
ing of the most serious nature along
the British front today especially
along the Beaurezori line, east of La
Catelet.
The last strong line of the Hin-
denberg system has been smashed, and
the British are in possession of it and
reconnoitering far in advance. The
Germans, apparently feeling that they
were fighting with their backs to the
wall, have launched six powerful coun-
ter attacks during the past 24 hours.
In the end the bodies of German dead
were piled high as the result of the
rifle, machine gun, and shell fire and
the British were in possession of vi-
al lines of the German defense.
Again there has been fighting in the
streets of Cambrai, around which the
British lines are slowly but steadily
being drawn. It is expected that the
town may fall at any time. In the
Lille sector the Germans are falling
back eastward, leaving only rear
guards behind to protect their re-
treat.

Apply Torh to
In Retreating; E
Guns Kill Many

(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
Paris, Oct. 5.-King Ferdinand
Bulgaria is reported to have a
dicated in favor of Crown Prin
Boris, who has already
sumed power, according to a Ba
dispatch to the Havas agewl
quoting advices from Vienna.
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct. 5.-Austrla-
gary has requested Holland to i
the belligerents to take part in r
negotiations, says the Vienna co
pondent of the Berlin Tageblatt.
correspondent adds that Hollan
ready has sent out the invitation
A delegation of Hungarian st
men, headed by premier Wekerk
arrived at Vienna, in connection
a new peace move, according to
Cologne Gazette.

missions in the U. S. national army1
according to an announcement of the
War department.]
There has -been a general impres-+
sion that-any man who came to col-
lege this fall would speedily receive
a commission. This is not the case.
Men enlisted in any recognized branch
of the service have an equal chance
with any man in the S. A. T. C. If a+
man possesses the necessary mental,
physical, and moral qualifications
nothing can stop him from being an
officer.
Physical qualities are rated accord-
ing to his physique, bearing, neatness,
voice, energy, and endurance. Any man
hoping to be an officer must possess
at least ordinary intelligence. He
must show adaptability, accuracy, ca-
pacity to apply knowledge, and abil-
ity to grasp readily, and to overcome
difficulties.
An officer must have character, re-
liability, loyalty, perseverance, cheer-
fulness, good personal habits, and a
spirit of service and general helpful-
ness are of prime importance. He
must be of general falue to the serv-
ice. His value as an administrator, as
an instructor, and as a leader in ac-
tion is given first consideration. Above
all things he must be able to arrive
quickly at a sensible decision in a cri-
sis. Any man possessing the fore-
going qualifications will be sure to
receive an officership.
There are many men who have had
some military training in college and
in officers' training camps. These
men have considerable advantage over
their less experienced comrades, and
many of them have already received
non-commissioned officers' positions.

(By the Associated Press)
Nowhere are the armies of the '
tonic allies being permitted to i
On the fronts of Flanders, Fra
Italy, Albania, and Turkey the en
still continues to lose ground, o
being compelled to throw strong
inforcements into his battle lin
hold back his aggressors.
Huns Give Up Strong Positlo:
The enemy is swiftly evacua
the salient between Armentieres
Lens, and the British are now
miles southwest of Lille over a f
of about four miles between Wa
and Equinghem. At the former p
having gained a position along
Lens-Lille railway.
Notwithstanding violent counter
tacks and a line strengthened
fresh reserves the British between
Quentin and Cambrai have mater
pressed eastward from the regio
La Catelet and to the north have
proved their positions in Cambra
well that apparently this impor
town soon must fall. Taking a
all, the situation of the Germar
this region seems to be critical
the crisis at hand. Far to the
aerial observers report the roads
gested with retreating troops, wh
being harassed by machine gun
of the airmen. As in Flanders,
are everywhere to be seen, and
evident the enemy, realizing tha
must give further ground, is vigo
ly applying the torch.
Yanks Capture Blanc Mont
Around Rheims the French
further extended their gains tc

ALL ENEMY ALIENSI
HIT BY NEW BI L L
Washington, Oct. 4. - The Senate
has- passed a bill which is another
cnin tha ri ht diratin ta kra nin

Step in te rigll arec onto Keep u
country free from the "enemy with-- north and northwest. To the e
in our gates." The bill which is I Champagne they advanced betwe
awaitin the resident's signatuie au- Suippe river and Argonne for

thorizes the exclusion and deportation
of aliens who are members of any
anarchistic or other such organiza-
tion.
Dr. Jessup of Iowa State to Talk
Dr. Walter A. Jessup, president of
Iowa State university, will deliver a
lecture at 7:30 Sunday evening in- the
Methodist church, under the auspices
of the Wesleyan Guild. Dr. Jessup is
vitally interested in educational and.
religious work and is said to be one
of the best known educators in the
country. This is to be the first of a
series of lectures given by theologians
under direction of the Wesleyan Guild.

addition to holding their .origin
tle line inside and east of the Ar
forest. West of the forest, wi
aid of French tanks, the Ame
have taken the important helg
Blanc Mont and pressed farther
ward.
Simultaneously the French hE
vanced their front eastward
Challerange and gained bette
parations for their operations
the railway towards Vouziers, in
ing the Germans inside the no
portion of the Argonne ,forest,
the Americans pressed nor
through the forest driving the
before them. The latest repor
(Continued on Page Six)

Open House at Harris Hall Tonight
Episcopal students and men of the
S. A. T. C. are invited to attend the
third of a series of informal recep-
tions to be held at 8 o'clock tonight
at Harris hall, State and Huron
streets.

r

II CARUSO-and Four Other Great

Concer

I

SEASON

TICKETS

ON

SALE

AT

HILL

AUDITORIU

X OFFICE, SATURDAY, OCTOBER

5,

8 A. M.-$4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.

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