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November 15, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Mir4tgalt all
IAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
IVLRSITY OF MICHIGAN
d every morning except Monday
university year by the Board in
Student P~ublications.
OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ociated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news dis-
edited to it or not otherwise credited
per and also the local news pub-
-in.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter.
'tions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
ications not to exceed 3oo words,
the signature not necessarily to ap-
int, but as an evidence of faith, and.
fhevents will be published in The
the discretion of the Editor, if left
ed to the office.
!d communications will receive no
ion. No manuscript willebe re-
Less the writer incloses postage.
ily does not necessarily endorse the
expressed in the communications.
Mighell.......Managing Editor'
:akinson..........Business Manager
. Osius, Jr............City Editor
e Clark............Night Editor
J. Martin....... .Telegraph Editor
Bernstein.... ....port Editor
I. Riorden........Military Editor
guernsey........Women's editor
Ehlbert...... .....Associate Editor
A. Gaines.....Advertising* Manager
Abele.......Publication Manager
2. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
ndis .rPaul G. Weber.
Horace W. Porter
REPO RTERS

stie

John Kyser
Herman Lustfield
Philip Ringer
Bowen Schumacher
Marie- Thorpe
iINESS STAFF
. . Leitzinger

LY, NOVEM%[BER 15, 1918.
Editor-Martha Guernsey
kKE UP, MICHIGAN!
un's lack of pep seems to be
like a tide over every phase
s activity, dampening every-
.t comes in sight. When in
Cy of football has Ann Arbor
ed such a tame Saturday on
of a big game out of town?
oome the team received Sun-
noon was pathetic in its lack
iasm. To be sure, there are
w students here who are not
he ways of Michigan, but it
shman who tried to put some
he assembly which wandered
ntly down to the station.
e is as new to the ways of
as the next man. Yet even
not make the mob yell with
more than half-hearted in-
'he members of the S. A. T.
more enthusiastic over their

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH-
BIG HOME SOCIAL
Games, Music, Eats
TODAY, 7:30
SATURDAY, 7:45 P. M.
STUDENTS WELCOME
MOTION PICTURES
("A Forward Step in Church
Entertainmient")
"SEVENTEEN"
(5-reel feature based on Booth
Tarkington's wonderful story)
for the tantalizing 14-13 defeat ad-
ministered in 1916. The Varsity will
do its part Saturday to send Syracuse
back with the memory of another
trouncing. Men and women of Mich-
igan, let's let them know today and
Saturday that they do not battle for
the glory of Michigan alone; we're
with them all the time. Let's go,
Michigan!
Our idea of a stiff job these days
is teaching the geography of Europe
to the little dears in fourth grade.
Among undesirable citizens, William
Hohenzollern is more easily elimin-
ated than the little flu germ.
Everybody out for the mass meet-
ing this afternoon with a War -Work
button on!
The revolution in Germany hasn't
much on present-day Washington at
that.
CARRIER PIGEON IS
HERO AT VERDUN
With the French armies, Nov. 14.-
A carrier pigeon was one of the he-
roes of the /most striking episodes
of the battle of Verdun. During the
siege of the fort of Vaux, Command-
ant Raynal had no other means of
communicating with the exterior.
During the fierce fighting around the
Thiaumont farm, contradictory re
ports reached the rear as to the occu-
pation of the position. The carrier
pigeon was the only means by which
the offileers in command could learn
the exact situation.
While the Germans were making
one of their strongest attacks, all the
telephone lines were destroyed and
the enemy's curtain fire made the use
of couriers impossible. Reinforce-
ments were required to hold a posi-
tion with no means of communicat-
ing with the rear until Lieutenant
Colonel Girardin sent several pigeons
back to the headquarters where they
arrived in 20 to 25 minutes and the
reinforcements were promptly sent
up.
When the Germans made a violent
effort to take the position of Froid-
terre, Captain Dartiges, in command
there, was cut off from the rear. At
9 o'clock in the morning he sent a
pigeon back to announce that the
enemy was within 500 yards of the
works. At 10 o'clock he announced
by the same means that the position
was surrounded by the enemy. At
11 he informed the staff that the sit-
uation was critical but that the garri-
son would fight to the last man. Thus
kept in touch with the situation, the
staff was able to take steps that re-
sulted in breaking of the line around
the position.

FRENCH GIRL MISQUOTED;
REFUTES EXTREME STATEMENT

RED ANO BLUE AMIES
BATTLE FOR. ANN AROR
S. A. Ti C. AND SIGNAL CORPS
SIiIRMISH IN SHAM
FIGHT

W omen I
Indoor gymnasium work for fresh-
men begins today. Regulation cos-
tumes will be required at allclasses,
except in cases where the clothes have
not been received.

The Victors" was writ-
I to arouse a cheer as
rs were sounded by a
Yet Sunday night
played, and 'well, too,.
C. band, silence reign-
if it had been a dirge.
whistles acknowledged
,st strains had died
re, indeed is Michigan

Practical work began in earnests
for the S. A. T. C. and signal corpsr
yesterday, when they took part in the
sham battle at the signal corps field.r
This battle was a skirmish planned
to bring into conflict two armies
which had been operating about Annt
Arbor.
Plans by Lieutenant Bolton
The details for the fighting were<
worked out by Lieut. Edward D. Bol-£
ton. The "red" army, coming from
the west, was supposed to have occu-
pied Ann Arbor on Tuesday night+
and was preparing to move on far-
ther west and take Ypsilanti. The
'blue' 'army came from Ypsilanti and
had entrenched itself on the east
heights when the foe assailed its1
trenches, charging down from Ob-
servatory hill in open formation,'
across "No Man's land" in full at-1
tack against the defenders' trenches.
After several counter attacks, they
were finally repulsed and the "blue's"
position was saved.
1,500 Combatants
About 1,500 men took part in the
battle. It was directed from the tow-
er on the headquarters staff building
by Lieut. G. I. Bach, who was in tel-
ephone communication at all times
with various outposts and important
points over the fleld. The flanking
parties and locations which were not
in the telephone line were reached
by signal men with flags.
During the battle the signal corps
men put up poles and ran a com-
plete telephone line down one of the
west roads with the aid of some of
the big army trucks. The work was
done with great speed. Other trucks
were used as 'tanks to support one
of the attacking parties. Owing to
the soft ground they could not do effi-
cient work, but they served to add
to the realism of the affair.
Few Casualties
A few men were detailed for stretch-
er and first aid work, and did other
miscellaneous duty about the
"blues'" trenches. However, most Qf
the participants were too interested
in the battle to play wounded, so the
stretcher bearers were not in great
need.
It had been planned to use blank
cartridges in the rifles, but none were
obtainable at the time of the skirm-
ish. This realistic element will prob-
ably be used in future battles.
-Moving Pictures Taken
A large crowd witnessed the fight
from Observatory hill and other po-
sitions around the field. A Ford mo-
tion picture man was on hand and
took about 1,000 feet of film These
picturs will be shown next week at
the local theaters and perhaps at a
special performance for the S. A. T.
C. men.
ART MASTERPIECE SUFFERS
FROM AIR RAID PROTECTIONS
Milan, Nov. 14.-A heating appara-
tus powerful enough to force heat
through a pile of sand bags twelve
feet thick and to dry without scorch-
ing the wall behind is needed to pre-
serve one of the world's master-
pieces, "The Last Supper" of Leon-
arda da Vinci which is painted on the
wall of the church of Santa Maria
delle Grazie. Tue dampness which ac-
cumulates in the sand necessary as a
protection from air raids is fast fad-
ing the colors of the pictures, already
damaged by time.
The restoration necessary for Leon-
ardo's picture is unsuited to the fres-
coes of Luini and other masters paint-
ed on the same wall. How to give
each set of masterpieces the treat-
ment required and still guard against
the danger in the air is the problem.

So far the experts of the Italian min-
istry of fine arts have been unable to
find a solution.
Delight Sweney, '19A, Studies Voice
Delight Sweney, '19A, left this weekr
for Cincinnati, Ohio, to be the guest
of Miss Bertha Baur, of the Conserva-
tory of Music. While there she will
take voice culture under Mlle. Zelina
DeMaclot, late of France and Italy.
Upon her return Miss Sweney will re-
sume her . University work in the
Architectural college.
Crack Squad Have Competitive Drill
Crack squad from each platoon
were picked at Grinnell college for a
competitive drill in the manual of
arms. The S. A. T. C. at this college
has also been given considerable
training in bayonet work under the di-
rection of the commandant, of the
corps.

A - beginning class in dancing will
start at 3 o'clock next Tuesday after-
noon. The class in advanced danc-
ing will be held at the same hour on
Monday.
More girls are requested to regis-
ter for the class in playground work.
The city Y. W. C. A. will begin its
classes in home nursing and first aid
at 7 o'clock this evening in the T. W.
C. A. rooms.
WOULD-BE OFFICERS
NOT TO GO TO CAMP
Men who expected to go to Camp
Grant this week have a perfectly leg-
itimate reason for having the blues.
Word was received yesterday at head-
quarters that all 0. T. C.'s are "taboo"
as far as S. A. T. C. men are concern-
ed.
The reserve engineers who were in-
ducted Wednesday number about 150.
The signal reserves will also be taken
Into the S. A. T. C. as soon as possi-
ble, orders to this effect having. been
received here yesterday.
A rumour current in military ranks,
says that all men recently sent to of-
ficers' training schools will soon have
an opportunity to return to civil life.
Tariff Problem in England After Peace
London, Nov. 14.-Recommendation
that "key" industries should be pro-
tected in Great Britain has been fol-
lowed by the organization of exhibi-
tion in England to show the products
and represent the claims of indus-
tries which desire to be classifled as-
"key" industries.
It is reported by the American
chamber of commerce in London that
the traditional upholders of free trade'
in Great Britain are accusing the
tariff reformers of a desire to' make'
the classification industry cover an
extremely large number of industries.'

WAHR'S

R

Your

every Banking need

hilfilled at the

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 $. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

I _.._

AT WAHR'S
Waldron's Company
Administration $1.50
Books and Supplies
in General for,
Soldiers and Sailors

iU

,I

I

BuY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES
AT
SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

The situation, however, is still en-
tirely open.
Kee p posted - subseribe for the
Daily, now $3.00.-Adv.

,.,... . ; . s.

Help WinTheWar
BY PREPARING FLR CIVIL SERVICE
OR BUSINESS
AT
Hamilton Business
College
State and 'William Ste.

Taiord vHand

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

THE ANSWER
Billiards and Bowling
HUSTON BROS.
We try to Treat You Right"

Men's- Suits
Topcoats
Overcoats

is

low on the War Work drive, when
the pep of the campus should be
amoned, and all 'our pride in ac-
nplishing ' a hard goal should
mpt every local Michigan man and
man of us to go to the booths and
ke our subscriptions, the attitude
ms to be "serene I fold my hands
I wait, for lo, the booth is too far
ay, I will make my pledge tomor-
r." Never before has anyone had
asion to say, "I'm disappointed in
, Michigan," and if anyone told
that Michigan was a slacker, you
uld take off your coat and say,
ll that to the marines." Put some
that spirit into this drive; this is
last day you will have the chance,
haps the last time you will have
hance to do something for the boys
r there. Don't let Michigan's hon-
flag drag in the dust.
HELP BEAT SYRACUSE
his afternoon a real old-fashioned
tball mass meeting with the old
-war enthusiasm, and the newer
r-time determination, and the pre-
.t victory joyousness combined in
great ebullition of Michigan spirit
1 endeavour to raise the roof of
1 auditorium. Those who have ac-
>ted this fall's lack of University
rit with resignation by saying,
ell, what can you expect with- the
and a war on?" have nothing .to
nark now, and if they are not on
ad to make this one of Michigan's
morable cheer-festivals, it will be
ause they, and not the times, are
of joint.
Phe team which raised the Maize
I Blue shield on Stagg field last
urday and brought home a victor-
s score after 13 - years armislce,
worked all fall without the visi-
support of the student body. Now
the time to show them that we're
h them. Syracuse comes to Ferry

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbot and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:zo a.
m., and hourly to 9:zo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 1o:5o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:4sP. 1n., ri~o a. in.F
r :io a. im., and to Saline, change at Ypsilaniti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m., to
12:20 a. m.
WAT K ING 1LOO
Open from 11:30 a. M. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

Our suits are cut by hand-
Thut into them to
stay !

Due to a misinterpretation, the in-
terview with Martha Jouard in regard
to the peace terms was not correctly
reproduced. What was really meant
is best expressed in Miss Jouard's own
words spoken in reference to the in-
terview yesterday.
She said, "I only wanted to explain
that the difference which may exist on
certain points, for instance, as to the
immediate reception of Germany into
the league of nations' comes only from
a different situation in the war and
not at all in a fundamental difference
in our ideals. President Wilson's ideal
is also ours; if I do not think. it can
immediately bekrealized, it is only be-
cause I have seen the way the German
soldiers behaved. This is my whole
thought. I did not want it miscon-
strued -another form, which
would iot -how enough my love for
Am ria and her ideals."
Detroit to Hold Giant Victory Parado
Detroit's giant Victory parade will
be held the afternoon of Sunday, Nov.
24, it was decided at a meeting in the
mayor's office Tuesday noon.
Tentative plans anticipate 100,000
persons in line with every industrial
organization in the city represented.

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

I " AI 1

We are headquarters for high
grade custom made uniforms.
Every garment is made by
skilled workmen.

Courteous, and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869-
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ........$4,000,000.00
NorthwestCor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORR ILL
Typewriters -I ± '
Typewriting"
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickel- Arcade Phn.1718
Fih.a nV

I

SAM BURCHFIEL & CO.
1063. Huron Stret

3 1

strong-

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