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November 15, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-15

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WEATHER
AND SLIGHTLY
WANNER

1

I

r 5k 1an

DIaiti

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

XIX. No. 39.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1918.

PRICE THREE

AMERICAN CHIEFS
LEAVETSTUDT Y
PROBLEMS BROAD
PEACE RELEASES 1,500,000 TONS
OF SHIPS TO CARRY SUP-
PLIES TO NEEDY
M'ADOO TO ISSUE NEXT
WAR LOAN IN SPRING
Secretary Plans Revision of Pending
Revenue Bill; Year's Expenses
Cut to $18,000,000,000
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 14.-Food Admin-
istrator Hoover and Chairman Hurley,
of the shipping board, sail Saturday
for Europe to study problems connect-
ed with the inter-Allied program for
feeding the peoples of northern
France, Belgium, central Europe, and
the near East..
Mr. Hoover and Mr. Hurley, during
the day, were In conference with Sec-
retery Lansing on diplomatic matters
oonnected with the food program.
The amount of tonnage available for
transporting relief supplies were also
discussed.
.One of Mr. Hoover's first tasks when
he reaches Europe will be to ascer-
tain the most urgent need for food and
reconstruction materials In northern
France and Belgium. Chairman Hur-
ley will devote most of his time in
conferring with shipping officials in
Great Britian and France regarding
the amount of shipping necessary for
carrying out whatever p'rogram is de-
termined upon.
Peae Releases 1,00,000 Tons
Shipping board officials estimated
today that the signing of terms with
Germany will result. in the release of
about iO, 000 tons of additional
shipping for carrying supplies to
.eedy countries. Of this amount 1,-
200,000 tons is represented by Ger-
man ships tied up in Germany or neu-
tral ports. Austria is believed to
have 250,000 tons of shipping in its
ports.
Washington, Nov. 14.-Revision of
the pending revenue bill with a view
to yielding $6,000,000,000 payable dur-{
ing the calendar year of 1919, and not
less than $4,000,000,000 in 1920, and
not less than 2,000,000,000 the follow-
ing year was recommended by Sec-
retary McAdoo tonight in a letter to
Chairman Simmons of the senate finan-
cial committee, setting forth the
treasurer's financial program for the
reconstruction period.
U. S. to Float Fifth Loan 1
The secretary estimated that the1
expenditures for the fiscal year would1
be $18,000,000,000, instead of the $24,-
000,000,000 estimated before there'
were prospects of peace. He declared
for continuations of the policy of loan-
ing to the Allies, for a limited time
during reconstruction after peace, to
enable them to purchase food, raw
materials, and manufacturing pro-
ducts in this country.
Mr. McAdoo did not refer to the fifth
war loan, which probably will be
floated next spring, but his calcula-
tions intimated that the size of this
might be around $5,000,000,000.
WARDS IN CHI PSI HOUSE TO BE
INFIRMARY FOR NAVAL UNIT
Lieut. Allen Porter, naval unit doc-

tor, has secured a ward in the Chi
Psi infirmary so that in the future
all medical cases developing in the
unit will be referred to him.
Apprentice seaman, George W. Lips-
comb, left yesterday for Norfolk, Va.
From there he is going to Moore-
head, S. C., to work in the yards and
docks department. Lipscomb has had
previous experience in this work. His
transfer came today from the head-
quarters at Washington.

TWO
GO

RESERVE CORPS
INTO BARRACKS

MICHIGAN TOWRM
UP IN PEP MEETING

Members of the engineer and sig-
nal reserve corps were transferred
into the S. A. T. C. at 4 o'clock
yesterday afternoon. At the meeting
Major Durkee and Lieutenant Mon-
tague, adjutant, assigned the men to
their barracks.
Sophomores were ordered to report
to barracks No. 17, 1408 Washtenaw
avenue; juniors to Sackett hall, and
seniors to the new Union building.
The order calling for the transfer
of the men in the signal reserve corps
was received yesterday morning.
$1,2 ,01 STUDENTS' AR PLEDGES
LAST DAY OF OUTDOOR .BOOTHS
CAMPAIGN TO DECIDE
OUTCOME
United War Work subscription
cards were distributed in the large
lecture classes yesterday by those in
charge of the civilian volunteer cam-
paign. The number of subscriptions
and the amount given were surpris-
ingly small, however.
The total amounts subscribed to
date:
$6,265.2 by 1,555 S. A. T. C. men.
$241 by 99 men of the naval unit.
$1,420.04 by 103 civilian men.
$3,099.54 by 486 women.
$11,026.10, total.
Today will be the last day of the
outdoor booth volunteer campaign.
The students will have to triple their
efforts if the quota is to be raised as
today will decide the final outcome of
the drive. Michigan is the only Un-
iversity in the country to have such
half-hearted response to the call of
the committeee, It is said. The small
colleges of the state have far surpass-
ed the University in the amount per
capita subscribed. Alma college pledg-
ed $1,477 the first day; Albion, $1,350;
Adrian, $477; and Hillsdale, $300. The
civilian men are the ones who are not
answering the call as readily as was
expected. None of the sections of the
University are taking up the work
with the proper spirit, according to
the general committee.
The women's committee met at
luncheon yesterday in Lane hall, to
decide on more effective plans for
making the appeal to University wo-
men. Various theories were expressed
as to the reasons why women have
been lax in making their subscirptions
within the required limit of time, but.
it was the general opinion that their
unresponsiveness was due to neglect
rather than to lack of interest and
willingness to help. The committee
has no complaint to make on the
pledges which have already come in,
but urges that more people take in-
terest in making this campaign a suc-
cess.
hun Women Call
Upon JITS. Wilson
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 14.-Appeals ad-
dressed to Mrs. Woodrow Wilson,
and Miss Jane Addams, of Chic
asking that the armistice terms be"
modified to prevent "unspeakable dis-
aster" have been sent by the wire-
less station at Nauen. They were'
picked up by the military Intelli-
gence radio at Haulton, Me., and were
made public tonight by the war de-
partment.
The appeal to Miss Addams was
from Anita Augsburg, at Poz, under'
the date of yesterday. It said that
the German women are "foreseeing

entire famishment and mutiny for
their country," and urged their
"American sisters" to intercede to
have the armistice terms modified.
"We are all free voters in a free
republic now, greeting you heartily,"
the appeal said.

S. A. T. C. and Naval Units to March
to Auditorium in Body After
Drill
"PADDY" LAMBERT IN CHARGE;
LAMPORT TO LEAD CHEERS
Girls Invited to Occupy Balcony;
6,000 Rooters Expected to Be
Present
What will probably be the first and
only pep meeting to be held at the
University this fall will be held at
Hill auditorium this afternoon at 4:30
o'clock.
For the purpose of putting old
Michigan spirit into the war time sons
of the school despite the fact that
military discipline reigns supreme, the
mass meeting was arranged for.
S. A. T. C. Men to March to Hall
With, the 1. A. T. C. and men of the
naval unit ordered to march to the
big meeting promptly at the close of
drill, at least an attendance of 3,000
is assured. Practically every student
of the University, who has the interest
of Michigan at heart, will surely be
there. Girls, too, are included among
those who are invited. En masse, they
will occupy the balcony of the big
auditorium.
"Paddy" Lambert, the famous foot-
ball star of the 1917 Michigan Var-
sity, is to be in charge of the meet-
ing. Cheer leaders have also been
provided for with "Brute" Lamport,
and White, both peppery freshmen, to
lead the noisemaking .
The meeting, authorities announce,
will not last more than an hour so
that it will not become a drag, while
it will be filled with pep from begin-
ning to end.
A few very short speeches will be
on the program. A number of Mich-
igan alumni are expected to be in the
city this afternoon, and they will be
asked to address the crowd.
Authorities Approve
Promoters of the affair have gained
the full sanction of the University au-
thorities while the Athletic association
has greatly approved of the meeting.
It is expected that fully 6,000 people
will be present. A number of different
diversions will be numbered on the
program while a band will be on hand
to furnish plenty of music.
It is probable that the school songs
will be taught to the assembly with
the bands providing theaccompani-
ment. "Varsity," "The Victors," and
"The Yellow and Blue," will be the
three principal musical numbers.
Every student of the University is
urged to be present.
ANN ARBOR ATMOSPHERE IS
MILITARY; 3,60 .IN SERVICE
The number of men in service at
the University has far exceeded the
estimates made before the school year
started. Section A, of the S. A. T.. C.
boasts an enlistment of 1,882, while
Section B, has 982 members. Includ-
ing headquarters division and the
medical corps, the enlisted personnel
of the army in Ann Arbor numbers
2,884 men. This is not counting the
newly inducted engineers or the sig-
nal reserves that will soon be taken
in.
There are 602 men in the navy. Ann
Arbor can justly be called a military
city since the tread of 3,660 pairs of
heavy shoes sounds up and down the
sidewalks and cobblestones of State
street at least three times a day.
Junior Medics Elect Class Officers
At a meeting of the junior medical

class, held yesterday, the following
officers were elected: president, A.
D. Ruedememann; vice-president,
Mildred Groesbeck; secretary, L. W.
Faust; treasurer, W. T. Hotchkiss. a

ELECT TEN GIRLS
TO MORTARBOARD
Mortarboard, senior girls' honorary
society, has elected 10 members for
the fall initiation. They are: Ruth
Dailey, Jane Duemling, Lucille Duff,
Martha Guernsey, Katherine Kilpat-
rick, Frances McDonald, Aane Mc-
Mahon, Winifred Parsons, Marcia Pin-
kerton, and Olive Wiggins.
ALLIES MAY DIS CUSS
PEACE IN TERSAILLES
ENTENTE OFFICIALS MOVE INTO
LARGE BUILDINGS AT
PARIS
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 14.-The general feel-
ing of the associated governments is
that Versailles is the most convenient1
place to hold the peace conference,1
and if this was decided upon it also
would serve as the recognition of the
paramount position of France in the
war.
In addition to these considerations
there are certain practical ones of
telegraph and cable facilities and of
easy communication between the cap-1
itol, and ample living accommoda-
tions, as compared with those in the
smaller Holland and Swiss cities.
Agents of the various Allied coun-
tries already are seeking large houses
in Paris for their delegations. TheI
American representation will moveT
from the small residence, which Col-
onel House and his taff now occu-
py, to one much larger. t
It is probable that the first meet-t
ing of the peace conference will be
held after the English parliamentary
selections.t
Get Your Gun Andr
Get A Gargoyle!

RUMANIA DECLARES WARTO FORCE HUN
T-OWITK DRAW TROOPS FROM COUNTRI
VANQUISHED RET-URN TO FATHERLAI

The "Treat 'Em Rough" number of
the Gargoyle will be on sale Satur-
day. How long it will be on sale is
not known. Last month the Gar-
goyle disappeared almost as soon as
it appeared; it was out and then it
was sold out. The same plan is to
be followed again-copies will be sold
by S. A. T. C. men.
Since many were disappointed in
obtaining copies last month, the edi-
tors of the Gargoyle suggest this as
the best means to buy a copy of this
month's issue,
Rise early,
Arm yourself with a good spyglass
and a piece of brick. Scan the hori-
zon with one and grasp the other
firmly in the right hand. Presently
you will notice an S. A. T. C. man
Run towards him. You will find c
ers running, too. Outrun them. If
you cannot outrun them, apply the
brick externally. You will reach the
S. A. T. C. man first. He will not-be
selling Gargoyles
Repeat this operation until you
find a man who is selling them. He
will be sold out, but will be able to
point out another who-has one copy
left. By great exertions you may be
able to secure this one.
As soon as you secure a copy, you
will at once be assaulted by three
or more rivals, who will try to take
it away from you. Open the copy
and read the first editorial, which
bids you to treat Huns, and Ilu germs,
and other foes ROUGH. You will
take courage and successfully beat
off your rivals.
Campaign Begins with Ill. Challenge
On the first day of the United War
campaign, )the women of the Uni-
versity of Illinois issued a challenge
to the entire campus to oversubscribe
its quota. The result was seen early
when on Sunday evening the pledges
amounted to over $1,500.

Victory Bulletins
(By the Associated Press)
Berlin, Nov. 13, via Basel, Nov. 14.
field Marshal von Hindenberg has is-
sued a proclamation to the German
army, saying in substance:
"The ever growing number of our
enemy, the exhaustion of our allies,
and the urgent crisis in the provision-
ing of our country, has forced us to
accept the hard conditions of the arm-
istice. By the terms of the armistice
we are obliged to rapidly return to
the Fatherland, which is a heavy
task.
"You will never be abandoned by
your field marshal in the struggle. He
will ever be confident in you."
Ghent, Nov. 14.-Brussels has shak-
en itself of the German yoke. Ger-
man soldiers themselves are removing
the shackles of the long suffering pop-
ulation.
The red flag floats over the head-
quarters of the German commandant,
and the officers have been disarmed.
General von Salkenhausen, the Ger-
man governor-general of Belgium has
resigned.
Berne, Nov. 14.-Vienna advices say
that Polish soldiers have occupied
the royal palaces of Belziders and
Warsaw, and also the military com-
mander's quarters. They also have
taken possession of the German mil-
itary automobiles, arms and munitions.
Polish officers are directing the Ger-
man demobilization.
Poles hold the post and telephone
stations connecting with Vienna. The
German .police have been disarmed.
Count Leichenseld-Moesering, the Ger-
man civil administrator, has fled.
How'd T"hey Live
Before The War?
"Only the good Lord and youth
keep the University students alive in
normal times," said Lieut. Allan L.
Piorter, who is stationed here in
charge of the medical reserves. "With
the hours they keep, the food they
eat, the afternoon and midnight
lunches and week-end trips, it is re-
markable they are able to keep up
with the life at all The regularity
of the army life has done wonders
for the men already. The type of
men seen here on the campus next
year will be decidedly different, with
strong, husky, clear-eyed men of
America, and the army training is
to be thanked for it."
Lieutenant Porter is a hearty be-
liever in universal training for wom-
en as well as men. "A routine of
early rising and early retiring with
a definite time for eating, studying,
with brisk exercises is the only life.
Girls, especially, are prone to neglect
all the rules that make for perfect
health.
"I hopefully believe that some form
of military training as the S. A. T.
C. will be continued after the war.
Life in barracks promotes health in
all respects. The .men are forced to
keep their living quarters in strictly
sanitary conditions. All of these reg-
ulations imposed form the habits
which make for perfect manhood and
in a larger sense a hardy nation."
A. S. Johnson, '20, Wins Commission
Austin S. Johnson, '20, who is in
training at Chanute field, Rantoul,

Ill., has received a cc- , ission as
second lieutenant In e America.
aviation corps.

20

MARSHAL FOCH ENTERS
ENEMY FORTS SUNDA
Fritz Destroys Excess Ammunition
Victors Give Foe 15 Days to
Evacuate Land
(By the Associated Press)
Basel, Nov. 14.-Advices receiv
here from Hungary say that Cou
Karolyi, president of the Hungar
national council, has made the a
sertion that Rumania declared war
Germany in order to force the Ge
man field marshal, von Mackense
to withdraw his men. It is stated th
von Mackensen contends that t
German republic is not a legitima
government.
(By the Associated Press)
Neurich, Nov. 14.-Rumania's ul
matum to Count Karolyi's gover
ment to evacuate Transylvania w
preceded by a general mobilization
the Rumanian army and the arriv
of an Allied army from the Balka:
in Rumania. The entry of the R
manian army into Transylvania w
announced from Vienna yesterday.
(By the Associated Press)
With the American army in Fran
Nov. 14 (7:15 P. M.).-Twenty Ame
icans, taken prisoners by the Germa:
recently, were freed today a
reached the American lines opposi
the first army. During the day mo
than 500 Italians, whom the Germa:
had employed as road workers, cros
ed the American front. They asse
ed that the Germans had told the
that they had better start south ii
mediately if they desired food.
Germans Fire Excess Shells
A further indication that the Ge
man withdrawal has begun w
shown by reports today from va
ous parts of the front to the effe
that explosions were being heard.
is believed that the Germans are d
stroying their old shells and amm
nition dumps in excess to the amm
nition which is to be turned over
the Allies according to the terms
the armistice.
The 32nd division reported exp
sions near Muzary and two hea
explosions in the direction of Etal
which were followed by lighter on
Other explosions were made beyo
Merles, and in that region this afte
noon.
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 155.-Germany's troo
began the evacuation of France ai
Belgium on Tuesday. The Alli
troops then moved forward, t
Americans advancing in the directii
of Metz and Strassburg.
Foch to Enter Metz Sunday
Marshal Foch, commander-in-chl
of the Allied armies, will make 's
emn entries into those fortresses r
Sunday, in the presence of Preside
Poincare and Premier Clemences
The marshal-will ride into the citi
on Croesus, his favorite charger.
The government already is consi
(Continued on Page Six)
THE DAILY WANTS TRYOUTS
Tryouts are wanted for bus-
iness and editorial staffs of The
Michigan Daily. Chances are ex-
cellent for promotion. Apply at
the Press building on Maynard
street in the afternoon.

AMERICANS AND 500 ITALU
RETURN TO YANKEE
LINES TODAY

U
- m

ANNA CASE

METROPOLI -°N
OPERA STA 1

COURSE
TICKETS
$4.50-$5.
$5.50-$6.O

HILL AUDITORIUM

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