100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE- MICHIGAN DAILY

,,

Mtd$iat lat1U
AL NEWSPAPER AT THE
VERSITY OF MICHIGAN
every morning' except Monday
university year by the Board in
Student Publications.
OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ciated Press is exclusively entitled
for republication of all news dis-
lited to it or not otherwise credited
er and also the local news pub-
in.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter.
ions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business, 960; Editorial, 244.
cations not to exceed 300 words,
he signature not necessarily to ap-
nt, but as an evidence of faith, and
events will be published in The
he discretion of the- Editor, if left
d to the office.
1 communications will receive .no
n. No manuscript will be re-
:ss the writer incloses postage.
ly does not necessarily endorse the
expressed in the communications.
Mighell.......Managing Editor
kinson.........Business Manager

us, Jr...........City
rk...........Night
artin......... Telegraph
nstein ..........port
orden ........Military
ey............Womens
ert...........Associate

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

nd A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
L. Abele........ Publication Manager
[d M. Majr..,....Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
REPORTERS
Ape John .yser
Aret Christie Herman Lustfeld
Dailey Philip Ringer
EllisBowen Schumacher
Hamis - Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Win. A. Leitzinger
RSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1918.
Issue Editor--Ruth Dailey
HE PERPLEXED S. A. T. C.
agedy, ironic comedy, and reluct-
happiness characterize the stua-
in which the S. A. T. C. man'finds
elf today. For him the end of
sar brings not a solution of his
:dual perplexities, but rather an
Wased uncertainty.
his case it is difficult to distin-
i between the tragic and comic
its. Tragic it is, indeed, that he
ld be stranded without having
the opportunity to fire one shot
iberty. And especially is it a
-calamity to men whose hopes
tering officers' training camps
arushed by the order discontinu-
the admittance of candidates to
schools. Irony and comedy are
ined when the S. A. T. C. man
a sung in his presence the par-
arly mal a propos words of
r There"-"We're going over."
only happiness he senses is when
neelfish side is uppermost and he
ces for the sake of others that
Sxis .at thand.
a disinterested outsider the
tt of the S. A. T. C. man borders
he comic. But for him who
rs not today what disposition is
made of him on the morrow, the
tioan is tinged by a shade of
s. Will demobilization of the
T C. follow shortly, or is there
ssibility that these men may be
ned as reconstructionists for af-
ie.war service in France? Tritely
king, the only thing certain is the
rtainty. With time alone will
the solution and the restoration
eace of mind to a large part of
igan's student body.
THE HOUR OF TRIUMPH
is is the hour of triumph; the
for which we have watched since
eginning of the war. Let us not
t in our great thankfulness that,
rtant as were the forces of this
try in determining the decision,
ce, England and Belgium did
share and more.
could not feel that it was a gen-
e spirit which was evidenced by
banner in yesterday's parade
h1 read "This is the flag which did
eferring to the Stars and Stripes.
ue, ou" country did a great part,
stood ready at any cost to purge
vorld of autocratic injustice, but
not called upon to give in the
ure which France, England, and
um gave in this cause.
ther let us be very sure we re-
ber . our Allies, even though we-
neglect ourselves. France, Eng-
and Belgium will never forget
we have done; let us have
ght-lest we forget.-Daily Illini.
has been suggested that the form
al popular in early western corn-
ties would be eminently suited
e case of the World vs. William
nzollern.

th the recreation time for the
measured in minutes, the prob-
of getting in those two baths is
to be getting more and more

FIRSTMETHODIST CHURCH
CHURCH SUPPER 85
(Home Cooking)
TONIGHT, 6P. M.
BIG HOME SOCIAL
Games, Music, Eats
TOMORROW, 7:30
MOTION PICTURES
("A Forward Step in Church
Entertainment")
"SEVENTEEN"
(5-reel feature based on Booth
Tarkington's wonderful story)
SATURDAY, 7:45 P. M.
STUDENTS WELCOME
to eat Christmas dinned in Paris as
any member of the S. A. T. C. has to
dine at an 0. T. C. on Thanksgiving
day. -
The merchants will have to think of
another one instead of "on account
of the war."
REPEAT DIRECTIONS
FOR XMAS PARCELS
Most Christmas boxes for soldiers
overseas, received by the Red Cross'
headquarters on William street, are
not prepared according to instructions
sent by the authorities and have to be
done over. This causes congestion for
the workers during rush periods. Per-
sons sending boxes are asked to heed
carefully the following directions:
Nothing should go in the Christnias
parcels which. will not' keep fresh
from time of packing until Christmas.
Dried fruits and other food products
should be packed in small tin or wood-
en boxes about one-fourth to one-half
pound size, and these should be plac-
ed inside the carton furnished by the
Red Cross.
Hard candy, including chocolates
must be packed in cardboard boxes
or wrapped in tin foil. Soft candy
should not be sent, as it endangers
the rest of the cont'ents of the parcel.
No liquids or articles packed in
glass should be placed in the package.
Christmas parcels will be accepted
for inspection each day from 9 o'clock
until 4 o'clock up to and including
Nov. 20 at the Red Cross rooms at
the corner of William and Maynard
streets.
MUSICAL SORORITY PRESENTS
FLAG TO CHORAL UNION
An interesting flag ceremony took
place last evening at the rehearsal of
the Choral Union at the School of
Music, when a large American flag
was presented to the school by Emily
Powell, '19, on behalf of the Sigma
Alpha Iota sorority.
The flag was received on behalf of
the School of Music and the Choral
Union by Prof. Albert A. Stanley who
responded feelingly and spoke briefly
of the significance of these times.
The flag was hung beside the large
service flag of the Choral Union.. The
latter was displayed at the last May
Festival and at that time - contained
52 stars, and this number should be
largely increased by this time. At the
conclusion of the ceremony the chorus
rose, faced the flag and was led in
the singing of the "Star-Spangled
Banner" by Professor Stanley.
High School Get Calls to Training
Despite the termination of the war,
four Ann Arbor high school boys who
had made application as ambulance
drivers for the Red Cross have re-

ceived their calls since peace has been
declared and have entered training
schools in Chicago. They are William
Housel, '18, Harold Handerbach, Rob-
ert Peel, and Bennett Avery. Harold
Cross and Alvin Lutz are awaiting call
they applied for ambulance work,
it is expected that they will be used
for driving trucks in relief work.
Toronto U Enrollment Decreases 450
One thousand nine hundred and
eight-six students are enrolled in the
University of Toronto for the school
year, 1918-1919, according to figures
published by that university's author-
ities. This is a decrease of about 450
from the enrollment of last year.
Among the numerous colleges, the
medical school has the largest en-
rollment, with 690 students register-
ed.
Cosmopolitan Club to Meet Friday
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
will be entertained at 7:30 o'clock
Friday evening at the home of Mr.
F. W. Stevens, 1245 Ferdon road.
Candidates for admission will meet
with the men at 7:15 o'clock in room
205, University hall. The president
of the society urges that all members
be present.
Always-Daily service-Always

UNTHINKING CELEBRATOR
CONDEMNED BY OAN TYNE
URGES UTMOST HUMILIATION FOR
GERMANY; FEARS
PACIFISTS
"It is time for prayerful considera-
tion instead of wild, unreasoning joy
such as I saw in Detroit on the even-
ing of the false peace alarm," said
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne yesterday.
"With the papers right before them,
denying the truth of the peace news,
men went on celebrating in a mad orgy
something they knew not what. No-
body knew what the terms of the ar-
mistice were. They did not know
whether the pacifist element in our
commission, taking advantage of our
enormous influence in the councils of
the Allies, had compelled the accept-
ance of certain sentimental ideas
about not embittering Germany by
the severity of our terms. Men had
not asked themselves whether it was
better to embitter the French and the
English who after all have borne the
burden and heat of this giant strug-
gle.
Demands Full Justice
"These nations know their enemy
whether we do or not and they under-
stand that unless by some plain dem-
onstration before the eyes of the peo-
ple the Germans can be convinced of
the fact that war does not pay and
that their military leaders are a mis-
erable failure, this war may all have
to be fought over again. This is no
time to take council from the simper-
ing' sisters of the Dial and the New
Republic ilk. Hard, manly thinking
and -imagination that carries us fa-
into the future are needed. TherE
will be little to rejoice over until our
reason is convinced that full justic
has been meted out to the criminal
nation which has made such a brutal
assault upon civilization that it es-
caped destruction by the barest mar-
gin.
Humiliation Should be Complete
"Germany's humiliation must be
complete," says Professor Van Tyne.
"She must begin like a convict newly
admitted to civil society to establish
her honor, her trustworthiness, her
fitness to take part in activities pur-
sued by sober, decent citizens. No
mere application of 14 abstract condi-
tions of peace of so general a nature
that nobody commits himself to any
definite thing by their acceptance will
accomplish the desired end.
"There ought to be a league of
democratic and decent nations to pre-
serve peace but not made up in part
of nations untrusted and unreformed
in their fundamental ideals. In a
word, all the great ends for which the
war was fought are yet to be realized
by wise and farseeing statesmanship."
U. S. NAVAL RAILWAY BATTERY
POSSESSES COLOSSAL GUNS
One of the largest cannon ever plac-
ed upon mobile mountings is now in
the possession of the United States
naval railway battery No. 1. The navy
department planned this battery to
man the biggest guns possible on rail-
way mounts. These guns can be ad-
vanced almost as fast as the enemy
can retreat and enable the Allies to
harrass him as far as 20 miles behind
his own front lines.
Ensign Humphrey Grylls, '17E, and
William Emery Fitch, '18. are two of
the Detroit boys atached to this bat-
tery. Practically the entire personnel
was drawn from the Great Lakes nal

training station.
College Army Units Contain 200,00
The collegiate sections of the serv-
ice have proved to be very popular in
all colleges of the country. Of the
200,000 men enlisted in this branch
of the service, 186,400 are in the
army, 12,000 in the navy, and 1,500 in
the marines. Up to and including
Oct. 28 there were 4:,421 men sent to
0. T. C., 120 to no-coms. schools, 5,729
to division of military aeronautics,
9,220 to coast artillery, 14,303 to field
artillery, and many thousands else-
where. Altogether 89,824 men left
their respective colleges for different
branches of the service.
Brigadier General R. I. Reese can
justly feel proud of the records es-
tablished by the S. A. T. C. units that
comprise his command. It is a sig
nificant fact to note that of the 89,-
824 graduates there has not been a
single court-martial or important

Women
Indoor gymnasium work will begin
today for sophomore girls. Fresh-
men girls will report tomorrow.
Complete gymnasium costumes will
be required this week, except in cases
where the clothes have not been re-
ceived.
The annual opening party for the
Women's league will be held at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium.
A meeting of the Women's league
board will be held at 9 o'clock Sat-
urday morning in Barbour gymnas-
ium. All members of the board are
urged to attend.as the meeting is im-
portant.
Those girls who wish to make post-
ers for the Vocational conference are
asked to notify Margaret Jewell, '20,
publicity chairman.

N

LYNDO N

719 N. University

AT WAHR'S
Waidron's Company
Administration $1.50
Books and Supplies
Sin General for
Soldiers and Sailors

WAH R'S

Ann Arbor representative dealer in EASTMAN KODAKS, films
and supplies, and photographer to Michigan Students. We do
THE amateur finishing business in Ann Arborbecause we do
the kind that brings them and keeps them here.

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

BRITISH AGREE TO
DIFFER WITH U.

S .

Established In 1905.

Growing bigger and better every day since.

London, Nov. 12. -President Wil-
son's note to Germany stating that the
question of freedom of the seas would
be left to the peace conference to de-
cide caused surprise here and is re-
garded as a very happy inspiration at
this moment of the crisis. Since a I
difference of opinion does exist-among
the governments fighting Germany the
surest way to render it innocuous is
to admit it. The :danger lies in the
chance it offers Germany to cause dis-
sension among the associated govern-
ments. However, such an attempt is
now checkmated and the Allies have
given the, bestproof of the firmness
of their alliance by showing that they
can agree to. disagree.
The war has shown that in the fu-
ture the British empire may be
threatened by all sorts of marine dan-
gers as yet. Consequently English-
men today are-more averse than ever
to signingaway/what they believe to
be their rights.
Commenting on President Wilson's
note, the Daily Chronicle says, 'Free-
dom of the seas is a subject about
which Germany constantly has sought
to create differences between Great
Britain and the United States, but it
may be affirmed with confidence that
on this occasion she will not succeed.
Any risk of Anglo-American friction
has been removed."
DEAN HINSDALE CONVALESCING
FROM PNEUMONIA ATTACK
Dean W. B. Hinsdale of the Homeo-
Dpathic Medical school is recovering
from an attack of pneumonia follow-
ing influenza.
A month ago when the. epidemic was
at its worst stage and he was work-
ing in the hospital almost continuous
ly battling influenza, he himself be-
came a victim. During the last few
days he has been able to go out a
little and it is hoped that at the be-
ginning of next week he will be en-
tirely recovered.

r4

-mmmm-mm

BUY YOUR
BOOKS and SUPPLIES

-'"'"m"""' AT"""

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STO-RE

m

y

UNCLE SAM SAYS:
"Our people will bowise
and patriotio enough not
to neglect the recreation
necessary to maintain
their efficiency." What do
you say?
See tomorrow's Daily for answer

To the Newcomer
YOU can obtain
p Nyour Sweater, Jer-
TrADE sey, Shoes, Foot
Ball Equipment, or
anything else in the
} 'athletic line, by
MARK mail from our Chi-
cag to almost
called in person.
Write for catalog of Fall and
Winter. Sporta
A. G. SPALPJNG & BROS.
211-217 S. State St. CHICAGO

WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
o fthe American Expeditionary forces:
Killed in action, 178; wounded severe-
ly, 28; wounded, degree undetermin-
ed, 150; wounded slightly, 31; miss-
ing in action, 166. Total, 553. ,
Class dancing at the Packard Acad-
emy, Monday and Thursday evenings,
8 to 10. Competent instructor and
chaperones. Private lessons by ap-
pointment.-Adv.

O D. .MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting ,
Mimeographing
Mas moved to
Niokels Aroade Phone 1718
First Floor
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)

i

i'

Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:ro a.
M., and hourly to 9g:zo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:os p. m., 10:50 p. i.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 12:20 a. m.,
i:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48. a. m., to
2:2o a. in.
Try our HOME-MAPI E

" fie )Gmerof &nergife"

I

CANDIES

They ,Are bath delip clxs and
MADEAND SOT.LD AT
TIESUGAR01QWL
1'houp 967 10ooS.&JIR N t.

Energine Cleaning is

Making -New Custom ers
EveryK Da
ARE YOU ON ?
Cleaning Pressing Repairing

I

I

Courteous and s~tlstgctory
T# ~THE N+T to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
Th Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North Universgty Ave.

I

Phone 2508

208 S. Fourth Ave.

breach

of discipline.

--"
-,
-., ~

W

7

f

SAVE THE PIECES! Broken Eye Glass Lenses
ground in our own shop, same day. Try our service.
Eyes examined.

Ray's"BETSY ROSS" Shop
The Fountain Room Deluxe
Hot Fudge Sundaes Whipped Cream Sodas
Hot Chocolate Supreme Malted Milks
We Cater To Those Who Demand The Best
Ko. 9 Kickels Arcade

HALLER

&

FULLER.

STATE ESTREET
"JEWELERS

much chance

- 1a

'1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan