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November 14, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-14

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_~ ..-- A 1 L
LY SNOWV
S TODAY

11I

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WII
SERVICE

No. 38..

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1918.

PRICE THREE

ANKEES START
ROUTINE DUTIES
NEAR MOSELLE
ERMANS WITHDRAW SLOWLY;
ABA DON FRATERNIZATION
WITH AMERICANS
FFICIALS ESTIMATE
U. S. LOSSES AT 100,000
overnment Bases Marine Casualties
Under 5,000; Unreported Lists
Not to Exceed 30,000
(By the Associated Press)
With the American army on the
euse and Moselle, Nov. 13 (P. M.)-
ermany's army was moving slowly
ong its full front towards the rear

I }

ENGINEERING RESERVE
GOES INTO S. A. T. C.
Members of the engineering
reserve corps will be transfer-
red into the S. A. T. C. Orders
were received yesterday from
the central army headquarters
at Chicago, calling them into ac-
tive service. The order effects
more than 150 upperclass engin-
eers.
All members of the engineer-
ing reserve corps are to meet in
room 348 of the Engineering
building at 2:30 o'clock this
afternoon. It is quite likely
that barracks will be assigned
by tonight.
No orders have been received
relative to the signal .reserve
corps. .
OBSERVATORY HILL TO
SEE-SHAM BATL OA

STUDENT CAMPAIGN
NOT ENCOURAGI-NG

The American forces remain exact-
ly where they were when the armis-
ice went into effect.
So far as known, at the American'
army headquarters, no disposition has
been displayed to block at any point
that part of the agreement providing,
for the withdrawal of the German'
troops. It is realized that he re-
versing of the gears of the great
broken German machine will not be
simple.
Few Huns Left Before Yanks
There would have been no surprise
among the American officers- had the
German front remained almost un-
changed, but already there appears to
have been left immediately in front
of the Americans little more than a
fringe of soldiers. In some places
even that line has been withdrawn so
far that the army men on this side
do not know its location.
The Germans reluctantly abandoned
their efforts to continue fraterniza-
.tion, where the lines still were in
proximity, but threats to hold as pris-
oners any one ap'proaching the Amer-
ican lines practically stopped their
visits.
U. S. Supply Trains Active
Behind the American line the ac-
tivity of the supply trains continued
today .and the troops mobilized at the
front settled down to routine duty.
There was an increasing number of
leaves of absence, however, and the
towns in the rear where troops were
stationed were gayer than at any
time since the beginning of the war.
The celebration that began Monday
night gained momentum, instead of
showing signs of abating.

SIGNAL CORPS AND S. A. T.
FIGHT IN REGULAR.
STYLE

C. TO

The signal corps unit in conjunc-
tion with the S. A. T. C. will hold a
sham battle at 2:30 o'clock this after-
non on the hill east of the observa-
tory. This hill and surrounding ter-
ritory comprise what is now known
as the Signal Corps field.
For about a month the signal corps,
under the direction' of Capt. R. V.
Hurlbut and Lieut. G. I. Bach, have
been constructing a series of trenches
on and around the hill. In all there
are about two miles of trenches. All
are of the latest approved type such
as were in use on the battlefields of
France, complete in every detail.
There are five types of trenches, let-
tered A, B, C, D and E; varying from
the front line or A type, to the E
type supposed to be situated 10 miles
behind the front lines. The staff head-
quarters is located directly opposite
the Observatory and from there the
battle will be directed. All signal
posts and other buildings close to the
front line are carefully concealed and
camouflaged as in actual practice. Of
course lack of space was a great hin-
drance in the laying out of the field,
but things have been worked out to a{
point of great realism.
Approximately 1,50 men will engage
in the sham battle. The operations of
the S. A. T. C. will be in charge of
Major Ralph H. Durkee. During the
battle the signal corps men will es-
tablish complete lines of communica-
tion, exactly as would be done under'
fire in a regular engagement. A fea-
ture of this will be the work of the
radio men.
All the details have been carefully
worked out so that the combat prom-
ises to be peppy and interesting. The
public is invited to attend, since an
excellent view can be obtained from
the Observatory hill.
SWISS ESCORT RED
GUARDS FROM LAND

Quota Fails to Advance with Rapidity
Expected by Members of
Committees
CO. 5 OF S. A. T. C. TURNS IN
AVERAGE OF $8 PER CAPITA
Women's Committee to Lunch at Lane
Hall and Discuss Methods
Of Boosting
At the rate. subscriptions have been
coming in, Michigan will close her
United War Work campaign Friday
evening with less than one-third of
the quota decided upon. The grand
total last night was but $9,816.76, the
day's total being $2,602.
Co. 5 turned in the best report of
any of the S. A. T. C. units. The com-
pany consists of 189 men, 175 of this
number subscribing $1,137. The other
companies have been averaging about
$2 per man or about 20 per cent of
the amount subscribed by Co. 5.
Totals Not Encouraging
The daily totals are as follows,
members of the S. A. T. C. $1,725, of
the naval unit $89, civilian men $344,
and women $443. Last year for the
Y. M. C. A. campaign the women alone
subscribed over $6,000.
The number of people subscribing
is 1,548, 1.034 of this number being
memb'ers of military organizations.
Only 119 men out of a possible 1,000
have given to the campaign.
Three army companies and five navy
companies have not as yet turned in'
their reports. Civilian students wait-
ing to ' be solicited should volunteer
their subscriptions at one of the
booths in the city. The girls in charge
of the women's campaign will lunchj
this noon in Lane hall to discuss ways
of boosting their subscriptions.
High School Also Busy1
The public schools of Ann Arbor
completed their campaign with a to-
tal of $3,582.95 in subscriptiong from
913 students. This amount is to be
raised by the individual earnings or
sacrifices among the boys and girls.
Of this amount 448 high school stu-
dents pledged themselves to pay
$1,965.75.
Blue Devil band
T o.Appear Here

SOCiAL DEMOCRATS ORDER
ARREST OF VON TIRPITZ
Amsterdam, Nov. 13.--The In-
dependent Social Democrats in
the new government have de-
manded the arrest of Admiral
von Tirpitz, former minister of
the navy, Major-general Keim,
president of the German army
league, Dr. Wolfgang Katt,
president of the Fatherland
party, Admiral von Holtzen-
dorff, former chief of the naval
general staff, and others, and
the establishment of a tribunal
to try all persons responsible,
for the continuation of the war,
and hindering peace.t
HOOR PATLY LIF
SUGAR BAN IN SOUTA

REST OF COUNTRY
SAME SUGAR
TIONS

REMAINS
REGULA.

V ictory Bulletin s
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 13.-The Alied fleet
arrived off Constantinople today, hav-
ing passed through the Dardenelles
Tuesday, the admiraltysannounces.
British and Indian troops, occupying
the forts, paraded as the ships pass-
ed.
Stockholm, Nov. 13.-Russian Bol-
shevik forces are marching on Fin-
land. They are now threatening the
Finish sea port of Viborg, 72 miles
northwest of Petrograd.
London, Nov. 13.- (5:30 P. M.)-
The British foreign office has re-
ceived no confirmation whatever of
the rumors that he former German
crown princet-has been assassinated,
according to the Exchange Telegraph
company.

(By the Associated. Press)
Washington, Nov. 13.-Increase in
the beet sugar states and in the cane
producting teritory of Louisiana, and
of the household sugar allotments
from three to four pounds per capita
was ordered today by the food ad-
ministration, effective Dec. 1. At the
same time public eating places in
these sections will be permitted to in-
crease their allowance from three to
four pounds for every 90 meals serv-
ed.
For the remainder of the country, it
was stated, the allotment of three
pounds monthly per capita per house-
hold, and three pounds per 90 meals
for public eating places, will be con-
tin ued.
The increase for' sugar producing
states was granted, the food adminis-
tration announced, because of the lack
of cargo space for overseas equip-
ment, together with insufficient stor-
age facilities in this country.
BRITISH OFFICIALLY CONFIRM
SINKING OF SHIP AUDACIOUS
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 13.-The admiralty to-
night makes it first official announce-
ment of the sinking of the Audacious,
which sank after striking a mine off
the North Irish coast on Oct. 27, 1914.
The loss of the battleship was kept
a secret at the urgent -request of the
commander-in-chief of the grand fleet.
News of the sinking of the vessel
was published in the United States
shortly after the disaster and the
British press printed an account of
the warship sinking about two months
later, but the government withheld
confirmation.
After striking the mine the battle-
ship remained afloat 12 hours, during
which practically the entire crew of
800 men were rescued. A terrific ex-
plosion took place on the Audacious
and she sank. The ship was later
raised and repaired.
OLD TIME PEP WANTED FOR
SYRACUSE MASS MEETING

REORGANIZATION OF WAR -DEPARTMENT
A ARMY PLANNED; REOPEN STRUGGLE
O VER UNIVERSAL MILITARY TRAININI

ONI

(By the Associated Presa)
Washington, Nov. 13.-Officials here
estimate that the total casualties for
the American expeditionary forces of
the war will not exceed 100,000, in-
cluding the men killed in action,
wounded, died of wounds, disease,,ac-
cidents and the missing, who never
will be accounted for. Some of those
who have been missing probably will
be accounted for when the prisoners
are returned from Germany..
Casualties Less Than 100,000
An unofficial calculation of publish-
ed casualty lists including those of
Nov. 12, shows a grand total of 71,-
90 men. Careful estimates made to-
day, based on knowledge of the bat-
tle conditions faced by the first and
second armies in the days immediate-
ly preceding the cessation of hostili-
ties, and on the average lists hereto-
fore, lead officers to believe that all
unpublished and unreported casualties
will not exceed 30,000.
Estimates based on previous rec-
ords placed the total marine casual-
ties in France at less than 5,000.
Hoover Cancels Substitute Measures
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 13.-Regulations
requiring householders and bakers
to purchase 20 per cent of substitute
with ach purchase of wheat flour wert<
witbdrawn today by the food admin-
istration. The withdrawal is effective
immediately.
MICHIGANENSIAN NOTICE!

Ann Arbor will have anopportu-
nity to hear on Nov. 23 the celebrated
French Army band, known as the
blue devils of France."
In the evening they will give a con-
cert 'in Hill auditorium for the bene-
fit of French soldiers, reserved seats
for which may now be obtained at the
auditorium at popular prices of 25 to
50 cents.
In the afternoon of the same day
the band will appear on Ferry field
during the M. A. C. game and play be-
tween halves. . The University Army
and Navy band under the direction
of Director Wilfred Wilson will play
the Marseillaise" in honor of the dis-
tinguished guests.
This organization is traveling in
America upon the request of the War
department and with the consent of
the French government. They are be-
ing brought to Ann Arbor by the war
board, the mayor and the University
School of Music.
PLANS FOR ANNUAL
JUNIOR PLAY MADE

- London, Nov. 13.-Five German sub-
marines arrived at Lindskrona, south-
ern Sweden, Wednesday, and request-
ed the naval authorities to intern
them, according to a dispatch to the
Exchange Telegraph from Copenhag-
en. The submarine commander said
they did not dare return to Germany,
INFLUENZA SHOWS
INCREASE IN STATE
Lansing, Nov.'13. - Spanish influ-
enza has again become epidemic in
some sections of the state, health
officers announced tonight. Cases re-
ported today from the affected local-
ities numbered 689, and in order that
he may keep a close watch on the pro-
gress of the disease Dr. R. M. Olin
has ordered the resumption of daily
reports by wire from all cities and
towns having new cases.
Some authorities ,blame the peace
demonstrations for the outbreak,
while others believe that the general
closing order was resumed too early.
Although another state wide ban was
not considered, the next few days may
see theaters in a number of towns
closed. At Bay City, Pontiac, Sagin-
aw, Flint, and Elmer, the disease is
said to be spreading rapidly, while
nearly all the towns in the upper pen-
insula are quarantined because of the
new outbreak of the disease.
FRENCH CHAPLAIN
TO GIVE ADDRESS
The Abbe Felix Klein, a distinguish-
ed French orator, will deliver a public
address at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall under the
auspices of the Cercle Francais. The
lecture, which will be given in Eng-
lish, is on the subject: "Restoration
ii France." A cordial invitation is
extended to all students and the pub-
lic. At the close of the lecture, there
will be an opportunity for the audi-
ence to meet the speaker.
Later in the afternoon the Abbe and
President Harry B. Hutchins will be'
the guests of honor at the meeting of
the Women's league, which is to be
held at 4 o'clock in the same room,
and where they will both address the"
assembly. .
The Abbe Klein has been chaplain
of the hospital of the American am-
bulance corps in -Paris and has had
ample opportunity to become ac-
quainted with America's efforts in the
great war even long before the Unit-
ed States formally entered the con-
flict.
French Propose Trying War Leaders

EXISTING LAW PROVIDES F
ARMY OF 375,000 'SOLD.
IERS
PRESIDENT P R O P O S E
RECONSTRUCTION BOD
Wilson Opposes Appointment of. Co
gressional Committee; Must
Be Specialists
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 13.-Plans for tl
reorganization of the war departme:
and the army itself now are in pr
cess of formulation by the gener
staff and soon will be before Secr
tary Baker.
Orders for the actual breaking up
the army cannot be promulgated u:
til these plans finally are complet
as the demobilization program is d
pendent upon the adoption of a r
organization policy.
Reopen Military Training Questlo
The secretary has indicated th
new legislation will be necessary 1
carry out the reorganiaztion, and I
is expected to lay a definite progral
before congress at the earliest po
sible moment. This may reopen tl
whole question of universlay militai
training and many legislators antic
pate a long legislative struggle befoi
final action is taken on whatever po
icy the secretary may prppose.
Existing law authorizes the Mai:
tenance of a regular army of appro:
imately 375,000 men. While It is
possible as yet to forecast the numb
of American troops that must be en
ployed in Europe, even after the peac
treaties have been signed, mlitaz
men =believe now that the authorize
regular establishment cannot provkd
an adequate force for all purposes a
home and abroad.
Reconstruction Commission Planne
President Wilson has under consir
eration an appointment of a recox
struction commission to develop
comprehensive program for the co
verging from a war to a peace basi
The commission would be advisor
rather than executive in function an
the plans developed and co-ordinate
by it would be carried out by existin
government departments and agen
ies.
As now considered the commissio
would consist of representatives 4
commercial, industrial, labor, agr
cultural, and social interests; I
membership would be small and -
would deal with all phases of t
great problem of easing the countr
from war to peace.
Opposes Congressional Committee
The President is understood to b
distinctly opposed to the suggeste
plan of having a congressional con
mittee prepare a reconstruction prc
gram. He is said to prefer men wh
can give their entire time to the .wor
and who have made special studies o
economic and social problems. Th
President is said -now to be consider
ing what emergency legislation ma
be necessary before the governmen
can proceed systematically to turn a:
resources of the country to peace tim
production.
How to shut off further war prc
duction without closing plants, throw
ing men out of work, and causing fi
ancial strain, is the most immediat
reconstruction problem facing th
government.
FIRST MICHIGAN UNION
DANCE SATURDAY NIGH'

(Havas Agency)
Berne, Nov. 13.-Woolf rural dis-
patches from Berlin declare that or-
der appears to rule everywhere in
Germany and that acts of anarchy
have ceased. The majorities and mi-
norities have divided the authority
between them, but the minorities have
been delegated, to second place, it
appears. The majorities are charged
with preparing the organization of a
German republic.
Expulsion from Berne of a Bolshe-
vik diplomatic mission was carried
out in the presence of an inquisitive
cro-d. The automobiles containing
the members of the mission were es-
corted on the way by infantry detach-
ments in motor trucks.
Revolutionists Form Republics
B y the Associated Press)
Basel, Nov. 13.--A dispatch from
Berlin says Grand Duke William
Ernest, of Saxe-Weimar, has abdicat-
ed in order to prevent civil war. The
dispatch adds that republics have
been proclaimed in Wurtein-burg and
Hesse. Thenew government in Bad-en
has been constituted under the pres-
idency of Jeiss.

Plans for the annual play given by
the junior girls were discussed yester-
day at a reception given by Dean Myra
B. Jordan for the class of 1920.
Laura Peacock, '20,. chairman of the
play committee, urged the girls to
turn in manuscripts for plays. Only
one play has been submitted to date.
-As they are not due for two weeks,
many more girls are expected to com-
pete. There are to be two acts, lots
of action and local color, and a large
cast of characters. The following
committee was appointed with Laura
Peocock as chairman: Assistant
chairman, Katherine Loveland; cos-
tumes, Rose Sturmer; property, Dor-
ine Potter; music, Anne Noble; busi-
ness manager,' Marian Ames; public-
ity, Lucy Huffman.

An out of town speaker is announc-
ed for the Syracuse mass meeting to
be held Friday in Hill auditorium. The
S. A. T. C. and the University naval
unit will occupy the lower floor, and
the first and second balconies will be
open to others.' The band will be
there in full force, and it is hoped
this will be an old-time mass meeting
with the old-time pep, which has been
conspicuous by its ablnce. The
meeting is for the purpose of cheer-
ing the team on the eve of its contest
with Syracuse. The team - will be
there, and it is the first chance the
student body will have to show that it
is behind the Varsity.
U. S. to Finish All Battleships
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 13.-All war ships
beiig constructed or contracted for
will be completed, announced Secre-
tary Daniels today . after a meeting.
He also said that the naval yards at
Mare Island, Norfolk, and New York,
which have enough work on hand now
to keep them busy for two years, will
be enlarged.

(Havas Agency)
Paris; Nov. 13.- Several
of the chamber of deputies

members
proposed

i
i

The Michiganensian staff will
eet at 4:30 o'clock today in the
fices, Press building. Members
the editorial, art, and sports
affs must be present.

in the chamber a resolution request-
ing the government to enter into an
agreement with the other Allied gov-
ernments for the trial of all former
rulers who were responsible for the
great European war. Under the reso-
lution the extraditions would not be
questioned, no matter in what coun-
try they have taken refuge.

The first Michigan Union dance c
the year will be held from 8 to 1
o'clock Saturday evening, Nov. 16, i
the old Union building. Tickets ar
75 cents and will go on sale at
o'clock this afternoon. The number i
limited to 100 couples. Unfortunate]
the status of the members of the c
A. T. C. and University naval un
has not been determined and attend
ance must be restricted to those wb
have paid the membership fee.
The old building may be reache
from the driveway of the new build
ing.

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