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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-13

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I I, , ,. * -Ia%- A I I N k _

DFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
+UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ublished every morning except Monday
ing the university yearbythe Board in
rtrol of Student Publications.
MBER Oh' THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled
he use for republication of all news dis-
,es credited to it or not otherwise credited
his paper and also the local news pub-
ed herein.
ntered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter.
ubscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
hones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
.ommunications not to exceed 300 words,
igned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
r in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
ces of events will be published in The
ly at the discretion of tht Editor, if left
>r mailed to the office.
nsigned communications will receive no,
sideration. No manuscript will be re-
ied unless the writer incloses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the
.iments expressed in the communications.-
dred C. Mighell.... Managing Editor
old Makinson..........Business Manager
rles R. Osius, Jr............City Editor
guerite Clark..............Night Editor
xes C. J. Martin..... .Telegraph Editor
ph A. Bernstein........ .Sport Editor
cent H. Riorden.........Military Editor
tha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
-k K. hlbert............Associate Editor
rand A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
es L. Abele.........Publication Manager
ald M. Major.......Circulation Manager

ISSUE EDITO0RS
David Landis Paul G Weber
Horace W. Porter
Edna Apel EP TES John Kyser
Margaret Christie Herman Lustfield
Ruth Dailey Philip Ringer
Irene Elis Bowen Schumacher
Twila Hains Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
( Win. A1. Leitzinger
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1918.
Issue EdItor-Philip Ringer
MAKE A NOISE THEY CAN HEAR
We, who have been cheering and
waving flags and cutting didoeslof all
kinds because the greatest war has
come to a successful conclusion, did
not win that war. We did, perhaps,
what we could, but it would never
have been won without the long days
of training, the discomfort, the sacri-
ficed opportunities, the blood and grim
effort of the men at the front and in
the long reaches of the service of
supplies throughout France.
And they cannot throwr their hats
in the air and take a long holiday.
There is too much still to be done.
The evacuated territory mustbeoc-
cupied, fortresses garrisoned, shatter-
ed communication lines and supply
bases rebuilt, towns made habitable
for the returning civilian population
of France and Belgium, and all the dif-
ficult and, often uninspiring tasks of
reconstruction completed. Our men
in France, after the first glad realiza-
tion that the goal has been won, must
turn at once to work about which

That last volley on the western front
was the "shot heard 'round the
world."
A War Work button Is, after all, a
better decoration than a garbage .can.
SOCIALIST SOCIETY
ELECTS OFFIC ERSt
The first meeting of the intercol-
legiate Socialist society Was held Sun-
day evening at the home. of Mrs. E,
M. Burt at 1321 Volland avenue. Sadie
Sigel, '20, was elected secretary to col-
lect the dues of the society. Mrs. E.
E. Kern was elected leader of the
study class. The members of the ex-
ecutive committee are Miss Atkins,
who is connected with the state party,
H. H. Johnson, Xenia Burg, and Mor-
ris Gordon. The circle will discuss the
work of reconstruction and the con-
gressional platform of the Socialist
party, during the winter. It will have
a reading on the "Communist Mani-
festo" of Karl Marx at its next meet-
ing. It is planned to hold meetings
on the second and fourth Wednesdays
of every month. Meetings will con-
tinue to be held at 1321 Volland ave-
nue until the society is able to find a
room on the campus.
NAVY AND MARINE
ENLISTMENTS OPEN
Aside from peace celebration, the
fact that war is really over is im-
pressed by the fact that the county
draft board received a telegram from
Ar jutant-General Bersey at Lansing
with the following message: "All calls
for the army, including individual in-
duction, stand cancelled. Calls for
navy and marine corps still continue."
This will mean the immediate ces-
sation of inductions into the army.
Men who have received call or are
awaiting call for the navy or marines
will still be subject to military serv-
ice as the last two branches have yet
a great deal of work to do both in
transporting troops, provisions and
material and also in expanding our
merchant marine. With the cessation
of the hostilities the navy will see
as much if not more duty than be-
fore. The task of bringing troops
back to the United States and send-
ing more over to aid in reconstruction
work is before them. The ranks of4the
navy and marines are not yet filled
to capacity and It Is not known how
long inductions in that branch will
be continued.
ANGELL HOUSE TO STOP RED
CROSS WORK; OTHERS CONTINUE

COLD AND HUNGRY
DAYS FOR RUSSIA
London, Nov. 12.-Russia is facing
a winter of hunger and cold augment-
ed this year .because of the extreme
scarcity of fuel which prevails in all
parts of that country. The lack of
coal has been keenly felt ever since
the loss of the Donetz basin to the
Germans early last spring. It ef-
fected the railroads and caused factor-
ies to be shut down
The Czecho-Slovak operations jn
Siberia and in the Ural region have
prevented any relief from that direc-
tion.
The stores of wood in Moscow and
Petrograd, owing to the lack of trans-
portation facilities and other difficul-
ties too numerous to mention, are far
from sufficient to meet the demands of
a long winter. A Moscow paper esti-
mated months ago that the supplies
of wood in that city would hardly suf-
fice to satisfy the needs of public util-
ities this winter, and that in consequ-
ence all private enterprises and homes
could not hope to get even a limited
quantity of it.
To one who has experienced the dis-
comforts of a cold Russian winter even
under better conditions, the situation
is far from alluring. The chilly at-
mosphere of an unheated apartment,
darkness in the streets and homes, the
quiet of a city undisturbed by the
rumble of street cars and motor veh-
icles, and, lastly, the uncomfortable
feeling of an empty stomach-such are
the prospects of the coming winter in
Russia.
PRES. HUTCHINS TO
TALK AT RECEPTION
The Martha Cook orchestra will be
a feature of the Women's league re-
ception and -meeting to be held at 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium. President Harry
B. Hutchins will be the principal
speaker on this occasion. Faculty
wives as well as all University wom-
en are cordially invited.
Doris McDonald, '19, resident of the
league, will give a brief talk on the
purposes of the Women's league and its
part jn campus activities. Elsie Er-
ley, '20, who is largely responsible
for the most successful membership
-drive the organization has ever had,
will give the results of the cam-
paign. Plans of the social commit-
tee for the coming year will be dis-
cussed by Cornelia Clark, '21, chair-
man of the social committee. Flor-
ence Fields, '20, will conclude the
program with a talk on War Work
plans, for Red Cross work, especially
necessary for the reconstruction pe-
riod. There will also be general
singing accoi'panied by the Martha<
Cook orchestra.
MILITARY MARCIN CLASS
INDULES IN MOCK SKIRISH

[_.o m n
Indoor gymnasium work will begin
tomorrow for sophomore girls, and
Friday for freshmen. All girls tak-
ing gymnasium work should see the
schedule posted in the gymnasium be-
fore tomorrow.
Complete gymnasium costumes will
be required at the first class ex-
cept in cases where the clothes have
been ordered but not received.
Providing the field is in good condi-
tion, the freshman-sophomore hockey
game will be played at 3:30 o'clock
today.
Mrs. Jordan's reception for junior
girls, which was postponed on account
of the influenza, will be given at 3:30
o'clock today in Barbour gymnasium.
Plans for the junior girls' play will
be discussed at this time.
The annual opening party for the
Women's league will be held at 3:30
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium,
The Women's league will hold a re-
ception at 4 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon at Barbour gymnasium. All uni-
versity women are urged to come.
There will be an important board
meeting of the Women's league at 9
o'clock Saturday morning.
INSPECTION OF PACKAGES FOR
SOLDIERS IN FRANCE STARTS

AT WAHR'IS

Waldron's Company
Administration $2.50

Books and Supplies
in General for
Soldiers and Sailors

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

k

Your

every Banking need

Fulfilled. at the

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. ate St,
(Nickell; Arpade)

... . v.._ .. . __ _.

11

I

BUY YOUR

Chrismas packages for the soldiers
in the American Expeditionary Force
are being inspected at the Ann Arbor
Red Cross rooms on Williams street.
The rooms will be open from 9 o'clock
until 12 o'clock in the morning and
from 1 o'clock until 4 o'clock in the
afternoon.
The time for sending parcels has
been extended frolm Nov, 15 until
Nov. 20 because the gifts up to this
time have been coming in very slowly.
Besides the time used for shipping,
much time is used up in inspecting
and packing the gifts and in order for
the boxes to reach the American sold-
iers by Christmas it is necessary to
hand them in to the Red Cross not
later than Nov. 20. The requirements
for the label and Red Cross inspec-
tion have not been eliminated be-
cause of the recent peace newt.
Students Prepare for Reconstruction
In the opinion of Japanese students
now attenidng the University of Mich-
igan, Japan is as much relieved by
the possibility of immediate peace as
is our own country. They anticipate
a great demand for reconstruction,

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

AT

I

SHEE AN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

.....

workers there, and are eagerly await-
ing the day when they will be able to
return sufficiently equipped to engage
in public activities. Many of these
students are pursuing courses in the
Medical school.
$50,000 War Campaign Quota at 111. U.
Teams have been picked at the Uni-
versity of Illinois to insure the rais-
ing o fthat university's quota of $50,-
00Q for the United War Work cam-
paign. This is the largest quota of
such a character that has ever been
set by the student body at Illinois, and
some difficulty is expected to be en-
,countered to complete the amiount.

there is little glamour, uncertain
when the time will come for them to
go home, living in an environment
where amusement which if not dull is
often wrong.,
While the war was on we talked a
great deal of the necessity of keeping
up the morale of the men. This was
partly in order that they might be
good fighters but it was also a duty
to keep those who were defending up
from spiritual as well as material
harm. The first is no longer neces-
sary but the second is more imperative
than ever. It would indeed be poor
thanks to the men to whom we owe
so much if at this time we showed.
by our sudden slacking of effort for
their welfare that our sole interest in
them was an anxiety that the wall of
flesh between the enemy and our pre-
cious selves should hold firm.
There is little danger that the peo-
ple of America as a whole will show
this incredible lack of gratitude.sThe
:seven organizations devoted to the in-
terests of the boys in service which
:are now asking for support in order
to carry on their work, needed now
.more than ever, will not find the na-
tional pocketbook suddenly selfishly
tightened because the national peril
rhas been averted.
Then let us here be ready to do our
share and prove that our loud rejoic-
ings on Monday were not mere lip-
thanksgiving. The University, student
body and faculty, did its part and
more in the war. We cannot do less
in peace. The boys. over there will
know it if we put the War Work cam-
paign over big. They cannot hear the
tin pans and the cheers. Celebrate
with your money as well as with your
mouth and pledge to the War Work
fund today.
Somebody believes that the ex-kai-
ser will throw himself on the mercy
of his cousin George. The main trou-
ble with this idea is that there are
numerous Englishmen between Hol-
land and Buckingham palace.
'Just when," says one of Uncle!
Sam's student soldiers, "the world
battle for liberty has been won, they
start in to make us study."

Red Cross at the Angell house has
received word from headquarters to,
stop making surgical dressings and
as a result has closed its doors. The
Ann Arbor and county chapters have
received notice to continue their work
with as much energy as before peace
was declared. The message, to the
county Red Cross chapter implied
that a large quota of surgical dress-
ings would be needed and the news
of peace should not hinder progress
along that line.
DANCES GIVEN AT SORORITY
HOUSES TO CELEBRATE PEACE

The Best Your Money Can Buy 0

Peace was celebrated at many of
the sorority houses Monday night.
Permission was given by the advis-
ory board of the University for a dance
to each sorority. The houses who
helped entertain the students' army
training corps and the naval unit of
the University of Michigan were the
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Delta Gamma,
Kappa Alpha Theta, Gamma Phi, Al-
pha Phi and Sorosis.

A mock skirmish was one of the fea-
tures of yesterday's tactics in the
girls' military marching class. The
squads charged up.the hill, which lies
at one side of the drill grounds, with
great eclat and thought it was lots of
fun to retreat when "to the rear,
double time" was given. Yesterday's
was the last session of outdoor gym-
nasium which the class will have.
A special indoor class in military
drill will be given hereafter on two
days a week. Sergeant-major Fischer
will take charge of it and it is ex-
pected that more complicated mano-
euvres will be practiced.
Returin of roops Doubtful Says Taft
Madison, NOV. 12.--lend of the war
does not mean the return of ourtroops
according to William 11. Taft in an
address at the win the war convention
held at the University of Wisconsin.

ARMY SHIRTS

$2.00, and up

Help Win The War
BY PREPARING FOR CIVIL SERVICE
OR BUSINESS
AT
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.
THE ANSW.
* Billiards apd Bowling
HUSTON BROR,
"We try to Treat Yp R gh il
DETR0IT UNITE) LINE
Between Detroit, Ann Arbe; aiqd Jgcksop
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-70 gt.
in., and hourly to 9.t4 p. trs
Jackson Limited and Express grs-8:49
a. m., anld every 1ur to 9:48 p. r. (E
presses make local stops west of Apn ArkorT)
Local Cars East BQun--6 ;q g. i., tp i
every two hours to 9:05 p. im, 0:,3o p, ,
To Ypsilanti only, 1 14$ p. In., i2l? a. M.,
r:ro a. ni., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m., to
12:20 a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a, m. to 12:00 p. m.
Lhone '120"R

WADHAMS & CO.

I STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

Wlean Jordan Entertains House Heads "Out troops may be held to garri-
Dean Myra B. Jordan entertained at son Germany, to help §teady the re-
supper last evening in Barbour gym- sults of the war. The German nation,
nasium the heads of the 30 organized due to the Hohenzollerns' does not
league houses. In the past there know how to believe in peace regulat-
have been monthly meetings to dis- ed by law," he said.
cuss plans for each organization. This
supper was to have been given sooner Kef p posted - subtc'ibe for the
were it not for the influenza epidemic. Daily, now $3.00.-Adv.
, '

li,

314 S. Statg St.

Anp ATiOM

._._...,.._4- --#-

frledical Students

you need
LABORA TORYSUPPLIES
and ulaamm
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS
We have them; of the best quality, and at the right prices

I I

HEN you buy a pipe bearing the
W D C trade-mark, you have the
satisfaction of knowing that your money
could not have bought a better pipe. The
W D C is strictly American made. You can
choose among a multitude of styles, sizes and
grades at the best shops-$6 down to 75 cents.

TRADE- MARK

WM. DEMUTH & CO., New York
World's Largest Pipe Manufacturer

Co rtepps a ld t~sactor
ThEAT IENT to very c u4 -
er, whether tie accQiint l it) 4rie
or small.
The Ann Arbor Barbns Bank
Incorporated 1819
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
OWNA V
CORONA
The light .
portable
typewriter.
Weighs 6f lbs. Ovet 175,000 In
use. Indorsed by the U. S. Gov
ernment. Price coiplete, W1th
case, $50.00.
322 South State Street
(Over Baltimore Luuch)
Typewriters bought and sold

11

Let's get acquainted

The Goodyear Drug Co.
107 So. Main Street Ann Arbor, Michigan

t ook at the lines of this one. They.
fiow,adelight to The eye,trom the rich
birown o,4e genuine ench Biarbowl,
' /lixougthe steriing sheen of the ring, to
t~ie jet b.lacustre of the vie:nile bit.

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