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November 13, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-13

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WEATHER
AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

I

£h Sir

~1at g

ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY "ND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

No 37.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1918.

PRICE THREE

r I

NTE LEADERS
NGE SOME Of
fISTC EM

MIADE TO
ANTITIES OF
TO HUNS

FOOD I

NEW CLAUSES AFFECT
EAST AFRICAN TROOPS
Austrians Must Get Out of Provinces
"As Soon as Proper Time"
Becomes Apparent
Washington, Nov. 12.--Germany lose-
es her entire fleet of submarines un-
der the armistice terms as amended
by Marshal Foch before he sent them
to the German envoys Monday morn-
ing. Instead of 160 vessels every one
of the underseas pirate craft must be
given to the Allies and the United
States within 14 days. Eighteen of
the articles as originally prepared by
the supreme war council and as read
to congress by the President were
changed under the limited authority
for alterationsgiven g thesupreme
commander in dealing with the enemy
envoys. The state department -today
received and made public the anended
articles with the explanation that no
information had come as to how the
changes had been brought about. Ap-
parently most of them were conceded
in response to the appeal of the Ger-
man spokesman, though several made
the terms more drastic than before.
To Provide Food For Germany
Instead of 50,000 railroad cars to be
surrendered in evacuted territory,
the number is made 150,000. On the
other hand the number of machine
guns to be delivered by the Germans
is reduced from 30,000 to 25,000. The
German troops in East Africa are per-
mitted to evacuate instead of surrend-
er; provision is made for food in Ger-
many, and the means of transporta-
tion, and a specific reference to the
regulation of repatriation of German
prisoners of war at the conclusion of
peace is added.
Evacuation of Russia Postponed #
The time of evacuation by the Aus-
trians and of the Russian provinces is1
changed from immediately to "as soon
as the Allies, taking into account the
internal situation of these territories,'
shall decide that the time for this has
come."
Territories which belonged to Aus-
tria-Hungary before the war are add-
ed to those which must be evacuated..
Another clause provided for an arm-
istice commission with which Ger-
mans will be permitted to carry out
the details under the direction of the
victorious military authorities and in
accord with applied notes, which weret
drafted during the conference between
Marshal Foch and the German dele-
gates.I

CURIOUS MOB GIVES
KAISER NO PEACE
(By the Associated Press)
Maastricht, Holland, Nov. 11. -
Amid a chorus of execrations from
2,e00 Belgian refugees the former
German emperor's special train left
here at 10 o'clock this morning north-
ward bound. A tremendous crowd of
sightseers had gathered, but the plat-
form was strongly cordoned and the
kaiser did not show himself.
His destination is said to be Amer-
ongen, about 20 miles from Utrecht,
where Count von Bentinck has a coun-
try seat. But it is not possible to
say where he will finally remain, for
in order to avoid the curious, he may
have to keep to the train for a couple
of days,
Amsterdam, Nov. 12.-No welcome
awaited William Hohenzollern, former
German emperor, his wife, and his
eldest son in Holland. They wait-
ed near Eysden in a railway train
with drawn blinds until the Dutch
government decided whether to allow
its unpopular visitors to remain or
not. Many people contend that as
William Hohenzollern and his son
are still in the army they must be
interned, others urge that they be:
sent back to Germany.
NO NEW FLU. CA. SES OR
DEATHS IN ENTIRE WEEK
S. A. T. C. CONVALESCENTS ALL
TRANSFERRED TO ONE
INFIRMARY

NO MORE MEN TO
OFFICERS, CAMPS
S. A. T. C. to Continue Training Here
Until Further Orders From
Washington
OFFICIALS AND COLLEGE HEAIS.
TO CONSIDER STOPPING WORK
U. S. Naval Forces and Marines to
Police World; Will Not
Demobilize
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 12.-Orders were
issued today by the war department
discontinuing the acceptance of ap-
plicants for the central officers' train-
ing camps, and stopping the organiza-
tion of any new classes. There now
are approximately 100,000 men in
training in these camps operating on
the monthly basis.
The November classes will be dis-
continued and it is a question wheth-
er other classes will be continued un-
til graduation.
Consider Plans Stopping S. A. T. C.:
The training in the universities is
now being worked out. Secretary
Baker said today that the best way to
stop this work without interferring
with the work of- these institutions is
being considered by thegovernment
officials and the heads of the colleges.
A system Is being worked out, said
Secretary Baker, without causing loss-
es to the institutions.
Secretary Baker indicated that no
definite decision has yet been reached
as to the future of various army divi-
sions now completely organized or
being formed at cantonments in this
country.

BOXING BOUTS PUT
ON BY SECTION B
An entertainment consisting of
three boxing bouts was staged last
night at the Newberry hall Y. M. C.
A. for the benefit of the men of sec-
tion B. All the companies were in-
tended to be represented but no one
from Co. 4 showed up. Co. 1 seemed
to be the most pugilistically inclined
and was represented by three candi-
dates. Under the direction of Ser-
geant Hughey as referee the follow-
ing bouts were run off. Dorrison of
Co. 2 sparred with Woodward of Co.
1, Baker of Co. 3 against Allman of
Co. 1, and Cook of Co. 1 and McCauley
of Co. 3 clashed in the final tussle.
All the bouts were three round, no
decision matches.
The bouts were rather slow with
considerable parrying, doubtless due
to lack of practice, but for the audi-
ence, what was lacking in speed was
made up in ludicrous clinches and
many humorous tumbles and knock-
downs. None of the matches showed
any pugilistic talent, but enough ac-
tion was shown to provide a very in-
teresting half hour.
MICHIGAN LEADS STATES
IN WAR WORK CAWEiN:
STUDENT VOLUNTEER TOTAL FOR
TWO DAYS IS
$7,9214.76
New York, Nov. 12.-Contributions
for the first 24 hours of the UnitedI
War Work campaign thus far re-
ported to the national headquartersE
were $23,100,054, it was announced to-3
night. Michigan leads the other states
with $5,348,000 and Ohio, Illinois and
New York follow in the order named.

Victory VTulletin;
(Havas Agency)
Paris, Nov. 12.-A dispatch to the
French Gazette from Budapest says
the new Rumanian government has de-
clared war on Germany.
- (By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Nov. 12.-Ten thousand
railway men have decided to maintain
traffic in Germany.
Amsterdam, Nov. 12.-The fortress
of Posen is in the hands of the work-
ers and soldiers, and the military au-
thorities have placed themselves at
the disposal of the council.
Zurtch, Nov. 12.- A republic was
proclaimed at Berlin on Saturday, ac-
cording to advices received from Mun-
ich.
Amsterdam, Nov. 12.-The provis-
ional government, composed of all
parties formed at Karlsruhbe, has is-
sued a proclamation announcing that
Baden will remain part of the Ger-
man empire, apcording to advices
from Berlin.
Amsterdam, Nov. 12.- The work-
mens' and soldiers' council at Ber-
lin announces that the former emper-
or, the former empress, and their eld-.
est son, Frederick William, have ar-
rived in Holland.
Bagdad, Nov. 12.-Reports have been
received at the American consulate
here, that 15,000 Americans have been
massacred at Hasu, in Asiatic Turkey.
War's Lnd Causes
City JMuch Labor.

Influenza is now a thing of the past
as far as Ann Arbor is concerned.
There have been no new. cases of the
disease nor any deaths resulting from
it in almost a week. The few remain-
ing S. A. T. C. men convalescing from
it have all been transferred to the
new infirmary, the Chi Psi house, and
nearly all civilians who had the dis-

ENEMY MUST SURRENDHER ALL SUBS;
STARVATiON THETN UN EMPIRE;
- ERMANS RACE BACK TO OWN BORDI

CONFERENCE TO BE
HELD HERE NOV.21
Vocational conference will hold its
first meeting Nov. 21. Dr. Reuben
Peterson and Miss Marion Peterson
will speak on the opportunities for
women in nursing and dietetics. Miss
Helen Davis, a graduate of the nurse's
training course at Vassar, will talk
on the opportunities in that field. Miss
Marjorie Delevan, from the state board
of public health, will also speak to
the Michigan women.
The addresses will be given Nov. 21
from 3 o'clock until 5 o'clock in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Person-
al conferences will be held in the
morning and directly after the meet-
ing in the afternoon. A time has nev-
er been known when nursing was as
much in demand as it is now and the
girls are urged to take advantage of
finding out definite information about'
positions along this line from au-
thentic sources.
British Mission Attends Convocation
Convocation was held at the Uni-
versity of Illinois, Saturday in hon-
or of the British Educational mission,'
which visited the University of Mich-
igan, Thursday of last week. The con-
vocation took the form of a dramatic
tableau, and made a marked impres-
sion upon the visitors. President
James of the university gave the ad-
dress of welcome.

J
.
t
i
t
t
1
r
t

ease have recovered.
Newberry hall and the Red Cross
convalescent infirmary have been
cleared of all patients. The former
has been turned over to the Y. M. C.
A. to be used as' a recreation center
for S. A. T. C. and naval unit men.
The Red Cross infirmary has been
closed. - Most of the men at these
infirmaries had recovered and were
returned to their companies. Many
were given passes to go home and the
rest were sent to the new infirmary.
Special Company Disbanded
The special company for men just
discharged from infirmaries which
was billetted at the old Union build-
ing has been disbanded. The men in
this company were recovered from the
disease but were detailed there for a
week to regain their strength before
being sent back to their original com-
panies. While in this company they
had a special mess, were given only
light drills, and were not detailed to
any hard fatigue work. 'The men now
are sent directly from the infirmaries
to their companies but are not al-
lowed to undergo any strenuous phys-
ical exercise, for a week or more.
Regular gymnasium classes and
other activities will be resumed at the
city Y. M. C. A. some time this week.'
S. A. T. C. and naval unit men will
be allowed to use the shower baths
and the swimming pool by paying a
quarter for the privilege. The "Y" has
been closed since the influenza epi-
demic broke out.
Avoid Disease in Other Cities
While places of amusement here are
running as usual and danger is over,
Major Ralph Durkee advises mem-
bers of the military unit who leave
the city on pass to keep away from
public gatherings in other cities where
he disease has not yet died out.
The epidemic has been almost en-
irely overcome in this part of the
state, according to Dr. J. A. Wessin-
ger, but he said that it was still viru-
ent in the northern peninsula. It
ecached the northern part of the state
ter than the southern part.

"S. A. T. C. units will continue
military and academic work withouti
interruption regardless of the armis-,
tice," states a telegram received by
the military and University authori-
ties here from the committee on edu-
cation at Washington.
The telegram also says that plans
have been prepared for the future of
the S. A. T. C. under the conditions
brought about by the armistice. These
plans will be sent out as soon as the
government officials authorize. Until
then the work of the students in the
S. A. T. C. will continue as usual.
Navy Not to Demobilize
Washington, Nov. 12.-It was an-
nounced today by Secretary Daniels
that no steps would be taken imme-
diately towards the demobilization of
any' part of the United States naval
forces.
The reason circulated for this state-
ment is that the United States, the
richest nation of the world, has suf-
fered the -least from the presetn war,
and should, therefore, take upon her-
self for the most part the policing
work for the enforcement of the arm-
istice terms.
70,000 Naval Men in France
About 70,000 men attached to the
navy or the naval department are now
in France, this number including the
marines with General Pershing. De-
mobilization of these marines will be
in accordance with the plans of the
army. Secretary Daniels added that
in previous wars this branch of serv-
ice was the last to leave the field of
battle.

Few Wear Buttons
Very few Michigan students have
been seen wearing their buttons. The
results of the first two days' pledging:
have been fairly encouraging but the
committee in charge has deemed it
advisable to keep the booths open
through next Friday. The total pledg-
ed Monday was $3,251.67. Tuesday's
total was better, $2,511.05 being pledg-
ed by the S. A. T. C., $331.50 by civil-
ian men, and $1,120.54 by University
women. The two days' total of
$7,214.76 was pledged by only one-
third of the personnel of the Univer-
sity. Undoubtedly the quota of $40,-
000 will be oversubscribed by the last
of the week. The civilian men are the
ones that disappoint the committee,
only 64 of them have subscribed while
686 S. A. T. C. men and 310 women
have done their share.
X. A. C. Over Top
Michigan's football rival, M. A. C.,
oversubscribed its goal of $12,000 on
the first day of the campaign. The
Lansing college has an enrollment of
only 1,600, while Ann Arbor can boast
of 5,500 students.
In order that the importance of the
campaign and the particular need of
funds be brought to the attention of
the civilian students, a committee rep-
resenting the different departments
of the University- met in Lane hall
last night and made plans to extend
the campaign through the class or-
ganizations of the University.

F 0 CH CHANGES ARMISI
TERMS; AGREEMENT MORI
SEVERX,
INTERNAL STRIKES EN]
EXCEPT SAILORS' MUTI
Fritz to Evacuate Both Sides of R
Within 31 Days; Austrian
King Capitulates
BULLETIN
(By the Associated Press)
With the British army in Fr
and Belgium, Nov. 11 (8 P. M.)
day long the rear guard troops of
shattered and defeated German a
ies opposite the British front t
been racing for their own borde
though their lives depended on re
ing their own land by nightfall
(By the Associated Press)
The guns everywhere are mut
Hostilities have given way to p
arations by the defeated enemy
avacuate all invaded territory in
cordance with the terms of the a
istice and by the Entente's force
take up the strategic positions ass
ed to them in order that the foe-
be unable to resume fighting.
Although the British, Belg
French and American a'mies b
stacked arms they, nevertheless,
on the alert for any eventuality.
thus it is purposed that they shall
main until the peace which, shall z
the world "safe- for democracy"
arrived.
Germany Begs for Bread
As the German armies In the 1
wend their way backward across
Rhine defeated, comes the cry f:
Germany for an early peace. Stai
tion faces the war-torn empire. (
many, which once. boasted that
would throw a circle of iron aro
the British Isles and starve the 1
ple into submission, today is beg
not alone for peace, but for bread.'
German people are not to be per
ted to perish for want of food.
tenance in abundance is to -be gi
them, but in doing so undue pr:
tions are not to be visited upon
peoples of the devasted countries c
which the Germans have swept.
In Germany proper the new gov
mental regime is apparently hold
sway. Internal strikes seemingly b
ended, except for a mutiny by the s
ors.
Terms More Rigid; All Subs Ta
Announcements of the armis
terms to Germany show that the
lies are more exacting in their
mands than was at first reported.
Teutons are to be stripped enti
of their submarines those wolves
the 'sea which have caused s
devastation, instead of 150, as i
was stipulated. A reduction in
quantity of some of the military eqi
ment to be delivered- up is made,
instead of 50,000 railroad cars, 1
000 must be surrendered. The tre
of Budapest and Brest Litovsk i
stipulated must be renounced and
evacuation of the Rhinelands on b
sides of the river shall be comple
within 31 days. The countries on
left bank of the Rhine are to be
ministered by the local troops of
cupation instead of local authori-
under the control of the armies
occupation.
It is again reported that Char
emperor of Austria, and king of H
gary, has followed the example of
chief colleague in the war, Willi
Hohenzollern, and laid aside
sceptre.

"h boy, I'm all in, this peace is
too much for me. Hope we don't have
another war soon," said one drooping,
book-laden student to another as he
was trying to get to a 7:30 as the
clock struck something that sounded
much more like eight.
"Same here, I'm just running on
,my reputation today," replied the oth-
er in a hoarse sleepy voice.
Recitations in classes and quizzes
were not what ofie might call extreme-
ly bright and scintillating yesterday
morning. While snoring was not car-
ried to excess, sleeping proved very
popular in lecture sections, when the
erstwhile celebrators made up for
lost sleep and energy of the day be-
fore
The city street department gather-
ed up three truck loads of pillage,
abandoned in the streets on Monday.
Such articles of household furniture
as water tanks, garbage pails, auto
rims, vegetable cans, and wash boilers
were among the assemblage brought
in from the public highways. Confetti
was abundant on Main street and the
street cleaner made a special trip to
rid the city of this adornment.
But it was sure a great day.
OUTDOOR RIFLE RANGE READY
FOR PRACTICE NEXT SPRING

U.

S. PLANS JOBS
FOR SERVICE MEN

(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 12.-Demobiliza-
tion of men in the military and naval
service of the United States after they
return from France will be carried
out largely on the basis of the ability
of trades and organizations to absorb
them under a plan being worked out
by the labor, war, and navy depart-
,ments and the war industries board.
It was said today that the plan will
be submitted to President Wilson in
a few days.
The war industries board has sent
questionnaires to employers in all in-
dustries asking the needs for men,
and the answers will show where,
when, and how rapidly jobs will be
ready for discharged soldiers and
sailors, and what grades will be most
popular. Local draft boards and com-
munity boards are to co-operate in
,this work.

GOVERNMENT CURTAILS PLANS
-FOR CALIFORNIA ARMY CAMP
Word was received at S. A. T. C.
headquarters yesterday that all prep-
arations for Camp Fremontfi, Calif.,
have been cancelled. Camp Fremont
was intended to accommodate about
20,000 civilians in training for com-
missions.
This is one of the first official steps
taken by the government to curtail
war preparations.
Adelphi Elects Officers for Vacancies
Lawrence Seltzer, '19, was elected
treasure and William Wachs, '21, ser-
geant-at-arms at the regular meeting
of Adelphi held last evening. Both men
were elected to fill vacancies.
In addition to outlining the work for
the ensuing year for the benefit of the
members, four new men were elected
to the society. These men are Mat-
thew Lamport, '22, Louis Gottlibe,
'22, Israel Goldstein, '22, and Joseph
Morris, '22.

Preparations for rifle practice for
the S. A. T. C. have been going on
steadily for the pas t two or three
weeks. Lieut. L. R. Amway who re-
cently came from Camp Perry, Ohio,
has charge of constructing the rifle
range located about two miles out
Packard street. Details have been
assigned lately, from various S. A. T.
C. companies to dig . the firing pits
which are to resemble trenches. The
W?*rk is practically complete but very
likely the range will not be used be-
fore next spring. During the winter
months practice firing will be held in
the indoor range at Waterman gym-
nasium.
The outdoor range is equipped with
seven double targets at a distance of
100 and 200 yards from the firing
trenches. All that is lacking for the
completion of the range are the tar-
gets and ammunition.
Camp Perry where Lieutenant Am-
way received his commission is spec-
ially equipped for rifle and revolver
practice. -

Nebraska Sets Quota at 25 Thousand
Twenty-five thousand dollars was
the mark set by the student body of
the University of Nebraska as their
quota in the drive for funds for the
United War Work campaign, now
in progress. The drive at Lincoln
started Friday.

DR. ESPENSHADE CONFERS
OFFICIALS REGARDING S. A
Dr. A. H. Espenshade, registi
professor of English- at Penns;
State college, and now one of
sistants to Dean Mortimer E.
who is the educational direct
this district, spent Monday and
day in Ann Arbor conferring w
University officials about the w
the members of the S. A. T. C.
several colleges. Dr. Espensha
charge of and oversees the adn
and registration work in this d

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