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November 09, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

'5 FOOD RIOT SHOW

&ICIIItGAIN
except Monday
by the Board in

LE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Press is exclusively entitled
ublication of all news dis-
it or not otherwise credited
also the local news pub-
postoflice at Ann Arbor,
d. class matter.
carrier or mail, $3.50.
or Press Building.
s, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
not to exceed Soo words,
iture not necessarily to ap-
as an evidence of faith, and
will be published in The
etion of the Editor, if left
office.
unications will receive no
manuscript will be re-
vriter incloses postage.
not necessarily endorse the
ed in the communications.
..........Managing Editor
........Business Manager
Jr............City Editor
.... .. Night Editor
n...I ..Telegraph Editor
n...........port Editor
:n........Military Editor
......Women's Editor
...Associate Editor
s. Advertising Manager
.....Publication Manager
.....Circulation Manager
E EDITOR'S
Paul G. Weber
ce W. Porter
PORTERS
John Kyser
Herman Lustfield
Philip Ringer
Bowen Schumacher
Marie Thorpe
NESS SgTAFF1

are two which might well furnish
material for an investigation by Uni-
versity authorities: an advisory isys-
tem for freshmen who might, thr gh
this medium be inocculated to a great-
er extent with the ideals of Michi-
gan; a well-directed policy of Uni-
versity advertising, by means of which
the University could draw from high-
erto unrepresented districts a greater
amount of scholastic and athletic
material. There are, of course, other
minor changes which might be made,
but the two suggested above , are
among the most imperative ones.
If our leaders realize that we are
"nearing the end of the tunnel",and
will occupy themselves in endeavor-
ing to solve the problems which are
already appearing, Michigan will em-
erge from the war a still greater and
more progressive University, worthy
to maintain the place which she has
always held.,

WORKERS' RSTINESS
WESTERN IDEAS AND WAR PROF-
ITEERING ARE THE
CAUSES
Tokio, Nov. 7.-(Correspondence of
the Associated Press).-The recent
food riats in Japan are dangerous
symptoms of a widening social cleav-
age in the opinion of Toshio Fujiward,
a leading business man of Tokio and
an authority on social questions. 'He
contrasts the conditions under which
the working class of Japan live with
the enormous profits of jgreat enter-
enterprises, and sees in the ostenta-
tion of the countless war millionaires
a social irritant which is causing the
theories of western agitators to work.
on the minds of the Japanese wage

The United Press' peaceĀ° celebration~
musthave made the kaiser feel like
the man who sat up in the coffin at
his own funeral.
The scriptural "wars and rumors of
wars" is being replaced by peace and3
rumors of peace.

earners.
Mr.Fujiwara thinks that Japanese
skilled workmen have already acquir-
ed the ideas of the working people of
western countries. He adds: "These
ideas, unfortunately mostly in a wrong
sense, are steadily working upon the,.
minds of our working people, espe
cially those in big cities like Tokio,
Osaka, etc. He continues:
"Leaders of the nation are there-
fore strongly, urged to adopt some
measures for relief of the general
discontent so that disaster may be.

1
WItomen I
If the field is in condition for prac-
tice, the senior-junior game will be
played today at 10 o'clock, and the
freshman - sophmore game at 2
o'clock.
The class schedule for indoor gym-
nasium work is posted in Barbour
gymnasium. Girls are urged to see
them at once so they will know the
hours that their class work come..
Required-hygiene lectures fdr fresh-
men and sophomores will commence
next Tuesday. They will be.,given at
4 o'clock on the secondfloor of Bar-
bour gymnasium.
Girls who have--not already orderod
or bought their .gymnasium outfit,
must secure them before next Wed-
nesday.
Gymnasium outds that were ord-
ered have not yet arrived.
Try-outs for Girls' Glee club will
be held at 4:30 o'clock next Tuesday
in Miss Nora Hunt's studio, at the
School of Musio.
Locker assignments may be obtain-
ed today from 9:30 to 11:30 o'clock,
and locker combinations will be ex--
plained from 3 to 5 o'dlock.
Booths for Uited- War 'Work Open
Booths for receiving- subscriptions
to the United War Work campaign
will be open on the campus Monday,
and Tuesday from 7:30 o'clock in the
morning until 5:30 o'clock in the aft-
ernoon. Girls are urged to -volunteer
to work in the booths on- Monday.
U N I FORMS
COMPLETE OUTFITS S. A. T. C.

We're at your service with

Army ai

TEXT BOOKS and

Supplies in General
A warm welcome and beat of service aways at

WAH R'S

Don't fail to visit our new lunch roo

11

_I

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

We make our own baked goods.

DAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1918.
e Editor-Paul G. Weber
)OD OLD FEUD RENEWED
the good old feud between
[andthe,.Maroons of Chica-
*e renewed. For 13 years, the
of football coaches, Fielding
of the University of Michigan,
Lently awaited this eventful
r 13 years he has been plan
ing, and working.
his work will culminate in
euanw to, be seen.
#'heth r Michgan takes the
or whether Michigan comes
it, today will be remembered
of the biggest days in the
fboth schools.tThirteen years
Maroons won from Michigan:
poits. Since that time, the
coach has prepared to
he defeat.
nds of alumni will witness
of today at Stagg field. To-
of thousands of people will
ith bated breath each move-
the 22 men who will be plac-
e gridiron. Michigan will get
ge, says Coach Yost. But it
to be a fight.
or the Maize and Blue conies
th the victory or whether the
keep it at home, the object
ame will be attained. That
fry that has held the univer-
terested in one another, de-
years of athletic enstrange-
ill be cemented, bolted, and
down by the contest of today.
RSITY RECONSTRUCTION
tce negotiations progress and
Dect of an early .cessation of,
s becomes more promising,
dable problem of post-bellum
iction begins to assume the
importance. Soundathinking
-sighted men, realizing the
of the task before them,
ling all their efforts to the
ig of the modern Gordian
there will be metamorphos-
tional and international af-
must there be many changes
rsity conditions. The mani-
lacements which the war has
ad will make necessary an
program of renovation.
peace is finally d'eclared and
d begins its long and ardu-
of getting things -once more
rking basis, education must
to play its part. University
's and students must be pre-
cope with the difficulties of
iction.
as the unforeseen organiza-
e S. A. T. C. caused a certain
disruption of University ma-
the after-the-war read-
should be accomplished
le confusion. That there is
an educational renaissance
a fact so obvious that
rfessors will have no ex-
they are unprepared to meet
encisof the coming"itua-
the period of reorganization
ay be instituted many im-
its which during normal
rnld be effected . only with
Iculty. It is then that ultra-

Our illustrious evening contemp
hates to be made to look like what
it is.
The new War Savings stamps are
blue-goggles for the kaiser.
GOVERNMENT MAKES CARBON
FOR MASKS FROM FRUIT PITS
Lansing, Nov. 8.-Many carloads of:
fruit pits and nut shells which will
be utilized in making carbon for gas
masks are reported to be on their
way to the gas defense division in
New Yorkrcity. So far only one car-
load has arrived."
It is estimated that a minimum of
1,000,000 pounds of fruit pits and nut-
shells are needed daily for conver-
sion into charcoal.
In addition to the soldiers, all oth-
ers who go near the frofit line, such
as Red Cross nurses, Y. M. C. A., K.
of C., Salvation Army workers, the
Y. M. H. A., and numerous other re-
.lief organizations, must have gas
masks. If the gas defense division
does riot receive enough pits and
shells suitable for gas masks, infe-
rior wood substitutes will have to be
used with the resulting higher mor-
tality rate.
FLU CAUSES NO DEATHS; SIX
PER CENT DIE OF PNEUMONIA
Of the 200 :members of the S. A. T.
C. sent to the Homeopathic hospital
during the recent influenza epidemic,.
there remain 20 who are now in the
wards proper, and 25 who are await-
ing discharge from the convalescent
ward. None of those in the regular
wards have had a temperaturedabove
normal during; the_ last three days.
There were no deaths due directly.
to influenza, and only six per cent of
the entire number of pneumonia cases
proved fatal. It is expected that the
wards will be free from all influenza
cases by Monday, and that these
wards and. the clinics may be re-
opened to the many patients who have
been on the waiting list for the past
three weeks.
Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, dean of the
hospital, who has been ill for the
.past three weeks with influenza con-
tracted in the hospital, will again be
in his office upon the opening of the
wards and clinics.
Navy Uniforms Continue to Arrive
Allotments of navy uniforms are
still coming in. A consignment of
complete uniforms was received
Thursday, most of which were given
out yesterday afternoon. In addition
to these complete uniforms, many odd
pieces were received, such as hats,
handkerchiefs, shoe brushes, and oth-
er small articles which will be issued
to fill out the outfits of those who re-
ceived incomplete equipment in for-
mer issues.,

338 Maynard

Across from Arc

avoided. Should this general discon-
tent of the working class be left with-
out remedy, we may have more seri-
ous outbursts and these may bring;
about a catastrophe to the empire."
Mr. Fujiwara urges that Japanese
statesmen learn a lesson from Amer-
ican and British statesmen in the
handling of national problems, espe-
cially food problems. Improvement
of the living conditions of the work-
ing classes in Japan, he believed to be
urgently imperative, and-this reform
should be inaugurated in thenbig ci-
ties of Tokio and Osaka.y
RED CROSS AT-ANGELL HOUSE
IN URGENT NEED OF WORKERS
Angell house needs more girls. In
addition to the quota to be finished
by Nov. 15, 4,000 drains have -to be
completed. Because of this new re-
quirement and due to the fact that
much of the allotted time was spent
in making masks, the Red' Cross is
unusually busy.O
Up to this time the Red Cross has'
merely asked the girls to come, but
this request now takes the form of a
plea, for the work must be completed
by Nov. 15. The Red Cross is open
every day of the week except Satur-
day and Sunday.
Dean Lloyd to Give Address Tonight
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Gradu-
ate school will addres the Interna-
tional Relations class of the Cosmo-
politan club this evening at 7:30
o'clock sharp.
The class will meet in room 205
University hall. It is organized for
the purpose of a scientific study. of
international relations. Lectures, dis-
cussions, and debates will play an
important part in the program for the
coming year. Everybody is welcome
to attend this and the following meet-
ings
You will viways find satisfaction by
adveritsing in the Daily.-Adv.

m

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

________muAT..inmeal

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AN"D NAVY BO4K ST

4

OvPercoats
Wool Unaifomw
Army Shoes
Army Sweaters
Hats d Cp
Puttoes
Insignia Cords
Shirts
Sheepski. Coat.
Unlforms. Maed .to
- eusuro
Military Instrutiou
Books"
Send for Catalog
Satisfaction or
Money Back

.

I

u {

See Our Large
Stock of
ELGIN, WALTHAM AND SWISS
MILITARY WATCHES
- Also -
FOUNTAIN PENS
WATERMAM and CONKLIN
Schlanderer
& Seyfried
LIBERTY STREET'

Try our HOME-MAE
CANDII S
They -are both'deltdcout ani
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOW
Phone 987 10 Mla

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t.

V,

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37 West 125t St, New York city

Do You Need Clothing7
No need for you to go this Fall and Winter in shabby, worn
garments- for it will not .
cost "you a great deal to

I

Help Win The" WE
BY PREPARINS FOR CIVIL SERYI
OR. BUSINESS
AT
Hamilton Business
College
Staite turd William Ste.

purchase a new

:',

Suit and
overcoat

from-our high grade stock.

' s
j
V1 "
I;'
II.
y
r.

DETROIt UNITED LINES
Between -Detroit, Ann -Abor and Jackson
(October a, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Expres-Cars-7 7:o- a.
m., and hourly to 9:1o p, m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-1:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Anti Arbor.)
L~ocal Cars East Bound-f :oo a.' iii;ad
every two hours to 9:os p. m., ieos p: in.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 11:ao -a. mn.,
ri:o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:43 a. m., to
12:2oa. ..
University Students
The Army and Navy headquarters
for cleaning and altering uniforms is
. situated at the corner of N. University
and Ingalls, where your khaki garments
will receive special attention by expert
;workrmen.-
We call for and deliver with
W. L. SLEDGB, Prop.
Open from 7:oo a. M. to 9:so p. M.
Phone 2784-W; 24-J
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTIB

MARLEY 2A iN
.DEVQN - .
11)61a!O Z . il .
C OLMARS
C uzrT Vs.&W*1& lc w lai.w

We are featuring, again
this season the well known

line- of

Hart Schaffner

Marx

--.6

THE E BE RBACH & SON CO.
202.204 East Liberty Street

We give you pure wool

A

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fabrics, and

the latet

styles; A fine "range' of.
colors and. patterns fro,;
which to select.

Courteous and
TREATMENT to el
or, whether the acct
or small.

ut be

- I

Fine Toilet Articles

CG~' h. z 196 is UtASchaffzifer & Marx

Cood Drugs
and

_r',
,

Sheepskins, Mackinaws, Sweaters
in -all isizes and colors at very low prices
REULE, CONLIN & FIEGEL
Home9 of art Sekaffne. A Marx Clothng
Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets

Capital and Surplus, $550,#
lRo "rces'........11",
Northwest Cor. Main & H
707 North University Av

I

Laboratory Supplies

WAI I
Open from 11

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