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November 09, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND N

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1918.

PRICE

ANS TAKE
SAND HOUSE

WOLVERINES LEAVE
FOR MAONAM

S. A. T. C.HAS
NEW CASE

ONE
OF FLU

(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 8.-A Republican
majority in the next congress of at
least two in the senate and not less
than 43 in the house was assured to-
day from the returns of the scatter-
AN ing doubtful districts of last Tues-
day's elections.
Word from Detroit of election from
Michigan, of almost complete official
returns, of Newberry increased the
D S Republican senate roll to 49, a bare
NY majority. The Democrats have 46,
with the Idaho contest between Sen-
)A ator Nugent, Democrat, and Good-
t ing, Republican, still in doubt.

Pei
rua

HOLT, OF INDEPENDENT,
TO SPEAKHERE SUNDAY
UNITED WAR WORT TO HOLD
LARGE MEETING IN HILL
AUDITORIUM

to'-

ed to be A patriotic meeting in the inter-
nation. I ests of the United War Work cam-
that te paign will be held in Hill auditorium
and that Sunday evening, at which time Ram-
was the ilton Holt, editor of the Independent
Ich the will speak. As editor of this maga-
ponsible; zine, Mr. Holt has written many pow-
he Unit- erful editorials of world wide interest
Admiral and significance.
as given In the fall of 1914 Mr. Holt was
rmistice in Ann Arbor and addressed the mem-
mediate- bers of the Wesleyan guild, making
he Unit- such an- impression on his hearera
dly been that he has been urged many times
im and since to come and speak in Hill audi-
rn of the torium so 'that more- could have the
rard im- opportunity of 'hearing 'him. This, is
to that the first chance he has had to satisfy
I second the demands. Major'Ralph H. Durkee
at reach and Admiral Robert M. Berry will
fter the also give short talks at the meeting.
ntal . au- 'Thia ia the: first "student meeting of
t who is the campus this -year, the influenza
ban having prevented mass meetings
and Convocation. All the S. A. T. C.
ror Wil- men will be present under military
the de- orders, and the University naval unit
German willN.be requested to attend. Dean
here to- Myra B. Jordan wishes that all girls
take advantage of' this- opportunity,
untarily and have as large .au attendance as
not, at possible.
take the The- meeting will begin promptly
ng over at 7 o'clock and end at 8 o'clock, as
of deliv- members of the S. A. T. C. are al-
hy. lowed only an hour. The Varsity
band will be there, and Mr. Theodore
i.)-The Harrison will lead the singing. Ab-
iven out raham Gornetzky, '19, student chair-
Winter- (Continued on Page Six),
delega-
,mmand,
Captain Old Frnends leet
lines be-
and that At Martha

Assistant Coach Douglass and Lieut.
Dilloh Take Charge of Varsity
Squad
SIX CONFERENCE GRIDIRON
GAMES TO BE PLAYED TODAY
Alumnus Hold Banquet in Chicago to
Boost Contest; Coach Yost
- Attends
(By the Associated Press)
Chicago, Nov. 8.-With indications
pointing to slow muddy gridirons, six
Western conference teams, and four
service elevens will go into action to-
morrow in struggles which are re-
garded as the most important of the
middle season.
Chicago will meet Michigan on
Stagg field in the first game between
these old rivals for 13 years, and 1111-
.nois will clash at Madison. Minnesota
wilt play at Iowa City. Purdue will
play the M. A. C. O. S. U., the 1917
,conference champions, will clash with
Case at Columbus, while Northwestern
will take on Knox college at Evans-
ton. Indiana will meet the Fort Ben-
jamin. Harrison eleven at Blooming-
ton, Ind.:.
Thirty-four strong, the Michigan
Varsity left last night for Chicago to
avenge the defeat of the 1905 Wol-
verine squad at the hands of the Ma-
roons, 13 years ago.
Douglass in Charge
With Coach Douglass in charge of
the men, while Lieutenant Dillon rep-
resented the military authorities, every
man-oi the squad was on the train
that left for the Windy City, Even a
cheer leader accompanied the bunch,
to lead the noisemaking for the Maize
and Blue.
efte o chi-
gan was held in Chicago last night,
to stimulate interest in the big con-
test. Coach 'Yost, the peer of all
football coaches, with Abe Cohn, the
smashing halfback and acting cap-
tain, were present at the banquet.
In the absence of Coach Yost, As-
ristant Coach- Douglass was in charge
of the light workout given the men at
Ferry field last night. Nothing more
than' signal practice was given the
,quad, with Jordan the sub quarter at
the pilot position, since Knode, the
regular pilot, also left early for the
scene of battle. ,
Steketee, Michigan's hope, and one
of the best punters that Coach Yost
has ever produced, was ordered to
kick the ball about the field a little
last night. That- was allthepra-
tice given the stellar freslhman.
The Yostmen 'willprance outron
Stagg field this afternoon in brand
new uniforms of the regular kahki
colored trousers and maize and blue
jerseys.
Don Springer, student manager of
the Athletic association, was given a
furlough yesterday by naval authori-
ties, that he might attend the contest.
The manager of the affairs of the
team left with the squad.
The team will stay at the Chicago
Beach hotel, which is but a short dis-
tance from the gridiron, while they
are in the city.
Large Attendance
Despite the fact that weather re-
ports are rather doubtful, everything
bids towards a record breaking crowd
being present. The contest of this
afternoon will be Michigan's initial
conference game this year.
Betting in foreign markets placed
the odds on Michigan, five to two last
night. Indications are that Michigan
will gain due revenge for the defeat

of 18 years ago. -
The Michigan Daily will maintain
special bulletin service at the Press
building during the progress of the
game this afternoon.

One new case of influenza was
found among the members of the S.
A. T. C. yesterday, the first one in a
week. No new cases of either pneu-
monia or influenza were reported to
Dr. J. A. Wessinger.
Conditions are such now that the
hospitals with their regular staffs can
take care of the few remaining influ-
enza and pneumonia cases. All S. A.
T. C. men on hospital detail will be
released from the work this morning.
About 50 men will still be detailed as
convalescent infirmary orderlies. At
the height of the epidemic there were
50 men on each of the three eight-hour
hospital detail shifts alone.
MEN BEING CHOSEN FOR
ARTILLERY0OrfI C ERBS
WILL GO TO CAMP ZACHARY TAY-
LOR SCHOOL, THE LARGEST
OF ITS SORT
Major E. G. Byers arrived here to-
day to select candidates from the S.
A. T. C. for the Field Artillery Cen-
tral Officers Training school, Camp
Zachary Taylor, Ky.
The school at Camp Taylor is to-
day the largest officers' training school
in the world and the only one in this
country from which field artillery offi-
cers hereafter will be graduated and
commissioned. Already, since the
opening of the training school last
June, about 4,500 have been commis-
stoned and there are now in training
approximately 10,000 candidates.
The school draws its candidates
from three sources, namely: the en-
listed personnel of the army, the S. A.
T. C., and civil life. There are now
in training there men of the highest
business and social standing from
practically every large city in the
COuntry. Among the candid es from
Niew York are included George F.
Baker, vice-president of the First Na-
tional bank; Stuyvesant Fish, Jr.,
Sumner Gerard, lawyer, and the broth-
er of Ambassador Gerard.
1,400 Men a Week Enrolled
With regard to the plans for the
school, Major Byers stated that ap-
proximately 1,400 men a week were
taken in. "We intend to ,take into
the school a continuous stream of
candidates," said Major Byers. "Men
of broad experience in professional
and business life are particularly de-
sired. In order to completely win
the war our army must be efficiently
officered, and it cannot be done if its
officers are young, inexperienced men
who have had no opportunities to de-
velop qualities of leadership.
'The more prominent position a
man occupies, the more it is his duty
to volunteer his services at this time.
[f the leaders do not take the lead,
the large majority of those who follow
will hold back."
Full information regarding the
Field Artillery Central Training
school may be obtained from Major
Durkee.
ENSIGN CARL BINTZ, '18E,
ARRIVES HERE ON FURLOUGH
Ensign Carl Bintz, '18E, arrived in
Ann Arbor yesterday to stay until to-
night. Bintz went to Pelham Bay
naval training station last Mty with
11 other engineers recommended by
the engineering college faculty be-
cause of high scholarship. He was
,later transferred from Pelham Bay
to Hoboken, where in August he re-
ceived his warrant as machinist.
Ensign Bintz made a trip to France

as junior watch officer on a merchant
ship. He received his commission as
ensign about the middle- of October
but has not as yet been assigned to
a ship. Bintz has been home on a
furlough and will report back to New
York tomorrow.

(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 8.-French troops are
continuing to press the Germans, hav-
ing driven the enemy from further
large areas on the battle front, ac-
cording to an official report issued to-
night.
London, Nov. 8.- The capture of
Avesnes, and the occupation of the'
western portion of Tournai, are re-
ported in Field Marshal Haig's of-
ficial communication tonight.

WAR BULLETINS

FRENCH CAPTURE P
YANKS CLEAR OUT
POSITIONS
ALLIES N E A R N
STRATEGIC RAIL
Entente Bombard Hirson
cation Line, Only Retrev
Retreating Enen
(By the Associated:.
The terms of the Eni
which Germany is to sect

London, Nov. 8. - Two hundred istice, has been handed

thousand prisoners were taken by the
British on the western front from
Jan. 1 to Nov. 1, inclusive, according
to an official announcement made in
the house of commons last night. In
the same period the Frenchtook 140,
000, the Americans 60,000, and the
Belgians, 15,000.
Paris, Nov. 8.-(4:20 P. M.)-Lead-
ers of the reichstag and of various
parties will meet tonight to determine
the conditions to be taken on the arm-
istice, says a dispatch from Berne
and printed in the Paris Temps this
afternoon.-
London, Nov. 8.-Prince Maximil-
Ilan, of Baden, the imperial chancel-
lor has resigned, according to a Ger-
man wireless dispatch picked up here
tonight.
DR. WISHART HERE
TO PUSH WAR WORK
Dr. Alfred W. Wishart, of Grand
Rapids, former Y. M. C. A. secretary
in France, addressed a meeting of the
.women's committee held at 3 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium. Judging from the enthusi-
asm evidenced by the members of
the committee, Dr. Wishart accom-
plished his aim-that of arousing zeal
for the United War Work drive.
He began his address. by stating
that the $175,000,000 asked for is..only
a portion of the amount needed. "The
need of the army and navy," he said,
"has grown beyond all expectations.
This need will last at least 12 months
longer and possibly for two years. Cer-
tainly the men will not come back
.before a permanent peace has been
declared."
The war has given men a hunger
for learning, comparable only to the
Rennaissance. The American Libra-
ry association is satisfying that want,
as the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. are
satisfying the physical hunger and
comforts of life.
Dr. Wishart also addressed a meet-
ing at Lane hall, held to organize
united war work among the S. A. T.
C. and the naval unit. This branch
of the work will be taken care of by
the unit commandants, Major Durkee
and Admiral Berry. These gentlemen
have made themselves responsible for
the pledges of their men. Lieut. H.
C. Bayliss, recently wounded in
France, also addressed the meeting.
Thrift Stamps for 1918 Given Change
Washington, Nov. 8.-In order tom
designate the 1918 issue of thrift
stamps from those of 1919, Secretary
McAdoo announced yesterday that
those made after Jan. 1, 1919, will be
blue instead of green. They will al-
so bear the portrait of Benjamin

delegates at the French arm
quarters at a little village in
partment of the Aisne, and t
man courier now is speeding
Spa, German headquarters
gium, with the document. 'T
man delegations endeavored,
said, to secure an immediat
sional suspension of hostilit
Marshal Foch refused to acqu
Kaiser Refuses to Abdia
Notwithstanding the fact 1
abdication of Emperor Wi
generally believed to be uz
upon any terms of an armist
the further fact that the majoz
ties in Germany have deman
he quit the throne, and that th
prince renounce his right to
cession, the emperor has ref
retire.
Meanwhile, throughout G
revolt is in the air, and the
is flying. A republic has been;
in Bavaria, and in additio;
Hamburg, and Schleswig, and
is in turmoil. Prince He
Prussia, commander-in-chief
German fleet, the greater
which is said to be in revolt
ported to be in Schleswig.
British Capture Tourni
On the battlefield the Gern
being hurried back to their
Tournai, an important center,
ported to be captured by the
who are across the Scheldt, v
barriers of great importance
them and Brussels.
Mies Cut Line of Retr,
To the south of Valencien
British have taken Avesnes,
'important railway junction pC
all along the front have pus
Germans farther east. Maul
'being advanced upon by the
The French again have cut de
'to the enemy lines and at
=counts were 20 miles north of
,on the railroad leading to
The taking of this town leav
one railway in this portion ove
the enemy can retire. This
Hirson line, which is daily
brought nearer and, at some
being bombarded by the Fre
More prisoners and large ad
.quantities of war stores ha
taken by the French. Frid
little infantry between the An
and the Germans west of the
but there were heavy repris
bardments held by the enemy
reported that the roads leadii
Sedan, Confians and Piedenh
,congested by the retreating
troops and transports.
Kenyon Company Acquitted of
New York, Nov. 8.-The C.
company and six individual I
ants were acquitted by a jury

BRITISH POUND WAYTO WARD BRUSE
SEDAN, CONFLANS, AND D1EDENH
ROADS IN TURMOIL FROM HUN T

rAbdicate
8.-The ab-
am andthe
wn prince

the

llan, of
m of the

YOUR

One would say that the trenches in
France in winter and the dining-room
of Martha Cook building-in the fall
are quite two different things. They.
had a good deal in common, though,
last night. Rev. A. W, Wishart of
Grand Rapids, who has returned from
France with the Y. M. C. A. and was
on the above mentioned fields of
France last winter with his friend,
Lieut. H. C.. Bayliss, had not seen his
friend since then or known of his
whereabouts.
Rev. Wishart was ready to exhort
the girls of Martha Cook to support
the United War Work campaign, when
another guest, unexpected and - un-
heralded, entered the dining room.
The girls who were decorously trans-
ferring food from plate to mouth were
startled by a cry of glee and surprise
as the Rev. Wishart, guest and speaker
of the evening, jumped from his chair
and rushed at the newcomer. Neither
of them had known that the other'
one would be there and for all they
knew, each was still wading through
'the mud of France.

bed for The
did not pay
by notified
fat chance
e to pay- at
f the sub-

Franklin. Otherwise the system of eral court here tonight on ch
thrift stamps and cards will continue conspiracy Jto defraud the
as before. The 1919 series will ma- -ment of the manufacture of r
ture Jan. 1, 1924. for the United States army.

TONIGHT

S.A.T.C. Mi

f;5..

University

War

Meeting

HILL AUDITORIUM
n Holt, Editor of "The Independent" Speaker

The lat
news fr
"Over t

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