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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,EWSPAPER AT THE;
ITY OF MICHIGAN
y morning except Monday
xiy year by the Board in
it Publications.
'HE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Press is exclusively entitled
epublication of all news dis-
o it or not otherwise credited
d also the local news pub.

gestive tracts are reported ruined be-
yond repair appear to be rather
husky dyspeptics.

Lered at. the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
gaI; as aecond class matter.
sriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5.
ices. Ann Arbor Press Building.
>as: Business, 960; Editorial, x414.
_ninications not to exceed o0 words,
'nd b signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
s of events will be published in The
Pt t iscretion of the Editor, if left
wald to the ffce.
viac cmunictionsn will receive no
tertion. Nmo manuscript will be re-
d unless the writer incloses postage.
SDaily doesnot necessarily endorse the
Sexpressed in the communications.
e. C Mighell.......Managing Editor
d Makinsone........Business Manager
le R. Os is, Jr.. ........City Editor
uerite Clark....... ...Night Editor
e C. Martin......elegraph Editor
fi A. Bernstein.......port Editor
t H. Riorden........Military Editor
haa Guernsey........Women's Editor
K. Ehlbert. .........Associate Editor
adj A. Gines. Advrtisi.g Manager
S. Abele.......Publication Manager
ISSUJE EDITORS
dI Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
REPORTERS
Ap41el john Kyser
aret Christie Herman Iustfield
DAiley Philip Ringer
Eillis Bowen Schumacher
ains Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Id M. Major Wm. A. Leitzinger
UNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1918.
ssue Editor-Horace W. Porter
THE AIRCRAFT REPORT
e feature of the Hughes aircraft
rt was the disclosure of huge
its guaranteed by the government
Irplane and motor manufacturers.
the investments, the guaranteed
its ran from 33 per cent to 500 per
Huge profits may be necessary
ttract investors to speculative en-
rises, but, on work that insures
Its as sure as the interest o a
rty bond, as most of the aircraft
racts were, a profit of 33 per cent,
to mention 600 per cent, is clear-
xtravagant. There is just as
h effort represented in the pur-
le of] a Liberty bond at four per
by a wage earner as there is in
Oing up an ironclad contract to
Ler millions of profit on less than
mual number of millions invested,
there is assuredly much more
sacrifice. The wage earner goes
.out pleasures and sometimes or-
'y comforts to lend his money to
governme'nt; the aircraft profiteer
eases his ability to provide him-
and his family with clothes, and
and entertainment.
stice Hughes certainly did not
state the case when he said that
extreme necessity for immediate
it justified the government in
rding contracts on a cost-plus-
t basis, but he did not say, and
her has anybody else said for pub-
,Ion, that the contractor was just-
in insisting on such terms. The
who has not only risked his own
but what is more precious, the
re of his little children and the
forts of his wife, will think deep
gits of such conduct-thoughts
may result in action decidedly
easant to the profiteers.
ere was more dishonesty uncov-
ii the building of Camp Custer
there was in the entire aircraft
ram. The prima facie case
nst Colonel Deeds is such as to
an awful burden on that gentle-
to disprove. As to the army or-
s who were charged with tech-
Il violations of the law against
ng dealings as government oaic-
with firms in which they had in-
sts, more facts should be learn-
before the public judges. It may
hat they merely cut the red tape
did the thing best for the coun-
under the circumstances. Men

ified for government positions at
beginning of the war generally
own stock in companies with
m they would have to deal if their
rience was to be used to the best
antage.
decision, clumsiness, lack of
sight were shown to have existed
he governmental handling of the
lane program, but it was also
wn that there was nothing like the
on dollars wasted that critics of
administration have been talking
it.
. China a man who disapproves of
policy of a governmental official
to the latter's house and com-
hari-kari on the front porch,
eby creating a deep impression
ni the mind and actions of his pol-
l opponent. Can't you envisage
1. committing suicide on the steps
he White House?

"From what I glean from The
Daily," remarks the alumnus, "it looks
as if Michigan might have a football
game this year."'
Saturday inspection furnishes re-
lief to the recruit more profound than
week-end liberty.
INLANDER TO PUT
OUT WAR NUMBER
"Timely," is the one word which de-
scribes the Inlander for this month.
The entire number is a reflection of
the spirit of the times-the war spirit.
The publication has caught the spirit
of the boys over there. It also is get-
ting there. ' From frontispiece to the
last page of the cover, there is a spir-
it which spells, "over the top."
The frontispiece is an autographed
photograph of Michigan's man of the
hour, Major Ralph H. Durkee, the man
who is putting the S. A. T. C. man on
the map. "Knock Out," by John Mc-
Manus, '21, is the feature story. There
is just one thing left for Germany;
that is to surrender. Margaret Walsh,
'19, has astory taken from the battle-
front. She has given her story the
title, "The-Surrender of Sam." In the
story Sam does not srrender to a
Hun, however.
Julio del Toro, a man who knows
South America and its people, has
contributed an article entitled, "Latin'
America Insthe War and After."
All contributions for the Chrstmas
number should be sent to the Ann Ar-
bor Press building before Nov. 15.
All contributions forthe New Year's
number must be in before Dec. 15.
SENATE EXEMPTS EXPORTED
LUXURIES FROM EXCISE TAX
Washington, Nov. 2. - The senate
finance comittee today adopted an
amendment providing that luxuries
and semi-luxuries exported to other
countries shall not be subject to the
new excise tax of from 5 to. 20 per
cent. The exemption was especially
requested by automobile manufactur
ers. Provision was also made for re-
lief of holders of distilled spirits who
may be unable to remove their stocks
before the proposed war-time prohi-
bition law goes into effect the first of
next July.
Army Offieers to Be Tried Immediately
Washington, Nov. 2.-Prosecution of
the three army officers held by Charles
E. Hughes, in his report on the air-
craft investigation to be guilty of
dealing with corporations in which
they were financially interested is to
be started without delay, it was said
today at the department of justice.
The cases may be laid before a feder-
al grand jury in Washington.
Government to Take Over Newsprint
Washington, Nov. 2. - Chairman
Baruch of the war industries board is
considering government control of the
newsprint paper industry by which
paper will be distributed to all news-
papers in the country to protect small
newspapers. The control becomes ef-
fective Dec. 1.
Theaters Will Probably Open Saturday
Although the influenza epidemic is
gradually losing its grip on Ann Ar-
bor, the health officials do not deem
it wise to permit public gatherings to
any extent. Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city
health officer, says that the local
theaters will probably open next Sat-
urday, Nov. 9.

ARCADE'
''The SaTV Curtoln" with Norma
Talmaege tTo the role> of Puck in "The
SafetyCnrtain,"NormaTalimadge bring.
all those varied capabilities for which
she has justly-gained fame. asone ofthe.
greatest, if not the greatest, emotional
actress on the screen. She. makes the
tired little dancer a human and appeal-
ing figure, nor does she relax her hold
on the sympathies when;ylater heis
seen as the wife of the army officer.
Her alertness, her ability to change' her,
expression in an instant makes her
constantly the center of attraction.
watch for date at the Arcade.

1
'wL omen
Dean Myra B. Jordan will be at
home to college women from 3 to 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon at 1215 Hill
street. Junior advisors are requested
to bring their freshman girls.
Girls who expect to elect indoor
military marching, swimming, or
basketball, are urged to register at
once.
No indoor gymnasium work may be
taken by any girl until she has bought
her locker ticket.

Registrants for playground
may sign up this week.

work

Regular hockey teams. will be an-
nounced at 1 o'clock on Monday aft-
ernoon, when the nanies of the first
teams will be posted in the Women's
league room in University hall.
The first teams will hold practice -on
Monday afternoon. Seniors and fresh-
men will practice at 4:15 o'clock, and
juniors and sophomores wil practice
at 3:30 o'clock.
In case there are girls who are
unable to practice at these hours, they
are to notify their respective parties
at once. Seniors are to notify. Mary
Morse at 608-M; juniors, Ann Kirk-
patrick at 2509; sophomores, Phyllis
Wiley at 201-J, and freshmen are to
call Miss Wood.
Hockey practice for the second
teams will be announced on Tuesday.:

NAVY CALLS FOR
1,100 MEN BY NOV. 9
Washington, Nov. 2.-Another call
for 1,100 men for service in the navy
has been made by Provost General
Marshal Crowder, to entrain from 16
states and the District of Columbia by
Nov. 9. Volunteer inductions will be
accepted up to Nov. 5. If the number
needed should not be reached by the
latter date, the draft boards will fill
the deficiency by summons under ar-
rangements for applying selective ser-
vice to navy and marine corps require-
ments. This method would be used
only for the reason of avoiding unnec-,
essary disruption in the working out
of the draft.
Over 600,000 men are now in the
various branches of the navy. This
number includes tho". working on
transports and those in the shipping
and supply service. Of the above
number, 66,000, are doing specialized
work. The navy has not made use of
the selective service thus far, and
there is little doubt but that the new
quota will be filled by volunteers be-
fore the draft will have to be applied.;
GIRLS MEET STRANGERS AT
TRAINS FOR WAR SERVICE
Groups of girls from Martha Cook
building met all incoming trains and
interurbans yesterday afternoon in
behalf of the War Camp Community
service . They directed out-of-town
relatives and friends who came here
to visit members of the S. A. T. C. to
the Hostess, house and helped them
reach their different destinations. This
act of- hospitality was- invaluable to
strangers in the, city and helped-many
in finding those whom they came to
see.
Barbour Gyz. to Be. Open Tomorrow
Barbour gymnasium has been fumi-
gated thoroughly and will be Qpened
to the, women of-the University Mon-
dAy, morning. . An' intensive- fumiga,.
tion was begun- at 6 o'clock; Friday
evening and continued through the
greater part of the night. On Satur-
day -the building was locked to every-
one and ventilated throughout. The
military authorities are at liberty to
open it today-but it is thought best to
keep the building closed until tomor-

Supplies in General
A warm welcome and best of service always at

a

M.

WAH R's

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

I"Mom

Army and NavyMcn!I
We're at your service with

mw

TEXT BOOKS and

ESTA I S H K'-D 1887
31, Years of Unexcelled Servie
121 E. Washington Street
7Phone121

K

I

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

FOR LIBERTY

- AT w

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general;
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Killed in action, 66; died of
wounds, 49; died from accident and
other causes, 4; died of disease, 71;
wounded severely, 106; wounded, de-,
gree undetermined, 267; wounded.
slightly, 264;-- missing in action, 50;.
prisoners, 6; "lost at sea, 1. Total,
874.
Total number of casualties to date,.
including those reported above: Kill-
ed in action, including 395 at sea,
11,076; died of wounds, 4,068; died of
disease, 3,046; died of accident and
other causes, 1,279; wounded in ac-
tion, 35;344; missing in action, in-
cluding prisoners, 6,191. Total to date,
61,604.

A R MY AND NAVY BOOK S T O RE

0

a

row morning, when the offices of the
dean of{women and the physical di-
rector:will again be located there.
Get that pipe at Cushing's.--d

' t

}hpWin The War
BY PREPARING FOR CVIL SERVICE
OR BUSINESS
AT
Hamilton Business
College
State and William St.

'\

I

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r

I

GO TO

Tie Mayer-Schairer

CORONA
Te light'
portable
,typewriter.
Weighs 6% lbs. Over 175,000in
use. Indorsed by the U. 8. Gov-
e $ment. Price complete, with
case, $50.00.
0. D. mORRIL
322 South State Street
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
Typewriters bought and sold

Company
112 S. Main $t.

I

FOR

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies.
Filing Devices
Desks
Chairs
Book Cases

Even though it is only a toothache
or earache or neuralgia (any of these.
makes one feel badly enough) or
maybe it is the Spanish Flu and that
is, badsur, the EletriO c Warming
Pad gets right at the root of the

III trouble.

Just warm or as hot as you

can stand; at your control.

r'

The pad ia soft and pliable so that
it fits the:ailing partand supplies a
constant, soothing, healing heat.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 19x8)
(Etern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:10 a.
in., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-S :48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (1x-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 oo a. i., and
every two hours to ;.g o3p. in., io:5o p. mn.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. in., 12:20 a. M.,
1:1o a. m., and to Saline, change at Y'-sitanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m., to
12:20 a. in.- -
University Students
The Army and Navy headquarters
for. cleaning and altering uniforms is
situated at the corner of N. University
and Ingalls, where your khaki garments
will receive special attention by expert
workmen.
We.call for and"deliver with
1 DayiSe vfce
W. L. SL EDUB Prop.
Open ~from 7:00 a. mn. to 9:30 p. mn.
}Phone 2734.w; 244J
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTHES
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
ThonnArbor Savings Dank
Incorporated 1869.
Capital and Surplu, $5O,000.00
Resourmes......5..$49000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North: University Ave.
WA IGNG LOO
Open from11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
nrm

/

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. - - __4

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Several makesCan be seen and
examiuned at our store and It is always
a pleasure to show you.

Your

every Banking need'

fulfilled at the

i

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 8. Main 33 S.StateoSt.
(Nickels Arcade)

'I

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The Detroit Edison Company

Williams and Main Sta.

Ann Arhor

,4

v

di-'

di-' 5 1214 S.

g

i

I 314 9.

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