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November 03, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L

air A

,I3at

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

No. 29,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1918

PRICE THREE

t -. r

TEN BEGINS
SON WITHOUT
IV ERINE GAME

N OF NORTHWEST-
E KEEPS MA1ZE
BLUE OUT

)ONS FALL VICTIM
ENGINEER ELEVEN
y for Michigan to Win from
o ns to Uphold Stndlng
in Conference

SELECTED O. T. C.
MEN AWAIT ORDERS
Nothing definite can yet* be said
about the time when the next detach-
ment of S. A. T. C. men selected for
officers' training camp will leave, it
was announced yesterday. Many men
have taken their examinations and
are now impatiently waiting further
orders. These orders can be publish-
ed only when they are received from,
Washington, and news about them is
exceedingly indefinite, as none but
the authorities there know the date
for the officer's material to leave for
their respective camps. The men are-
now waiting to go to three camps:
the infantry training camp at Camp
Grant, Ill.; the field artillery at Camp'
Taylor, Ky., and the coast, or heavy
artillery at Fortress Monroe, Va.
There is a new infantry officers'
training school at Camp Fremont,
California, which will be opened De-
cember 1. Although Michigan's quota
for this camp is 520 men, no members
of the S. A. T. C. will be sent. All ap-
plicants must -be civilians.
PEACE TERMS WILL NOT
BE CRUSHING SAYS CRN
DECLARES THAT ALLIES SHOULD
NOT REPEAT GERMAN
MISTAKE

Council to
Armies

ALLIES TO ISSUE
ANSWER MONDAY

the fact that the Confer-
on for 1918 opened official-
lay, the Wolverines, just re-
the Big Ten, were unable
n opener. The Northwestern
ich was scheduled to have
red here yesterday was can-
ause of the flu.
rr, Michigan fans centered
rest about two games in
ims that Michigan is yet to
season, were engaged.
1ichigan Must Win
sult of the Purdue-Chicago
igs high hopes to the Mich-
p, as Purdue's victory over
gg's bunch greatly strength-
gan chance at a victory over
n squad. It is now up to
to take the bacon from the
eam Saturda'y, when they
them at the Midway.
gie contest with the West-
Normal, resulting in a vic-
to 7, over the Normal school
s evidence of the strength
armer team. The Yostmen
e Aggies.on the twenty-third

Ask Germany to Withdraw
30 Miles East of Rhine
River

BERLIN MUST ACCEPT -
OR REJECT ALL TERMS
Boehe Must Give Up Subs and Heligo-
land Fortresses; Wilson Confers
With Colonel douse
(November .third is the first anni-
versary of the clash between Ameri-
can and German troops. Along the
Rhine-Marne canal on Nov. 3, 1917,
American and German patrols met
for the first time and the enemy was
defeated.)
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 2.-The supreme
war council at Versailles, it was learn-
ed today through diplomatic chan-
neils, has under consideration as a
starting point for an armistice pro-
posal, that Germany -be required to
withdraw her armies, without their
military supplies or the loot being
carried from France or Belgium, to a
zone 30 miles tfo the German side of
the Rhine, and. that the entire German
navy, including submarines, and the
Heligoland fortresses be surrender-
ed. It is possible that the c1b ditions,
when~ they are fitally agreed upon,
may not emerge in exactly this de-
gree, but it is believed that it will be
no less potent for preserving the mil-
itary supremacy for the Allies, and at
the same time offering propositions
which the Germans may accept with-
out further comment.

CHECK OF FLU NO
CAUSE FOR NEGLECT
No deaths and no new cases of eith-
-,er influenza or pneumonia occurred
,yesterday among members of the S.
A. T. C. or civilians in the city. This
shows that the epidemic has spent It-
self in Ann Arbor but medical and
military authorities warn against
throwing aside precaution.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger said last night:
"Precautions against the disease
should be continued to prevent the
epidemic from breaking out again, but
,if the public does not become overly
optimistic there is little danger.
"The city schools will open Mon-
day but I do not believe other public
places will open before next Satur-
day. The epidemic has subsided in the
southern part of the state but it has
not yet reached its crest in the north-
ern peninsula."
PLANS-OR UNITED WAR
WORK .CAMPAIN MADE

COMMITTEES APPOINTED
SWING BIG CAMPUS
' DRIVE

AUSTHIAN EMISSARIES RECEIVE TERM
IT14 AYGISP1;SABFOE PRISONERS SWELL TO 0000 P

TO

The Allies will not make the mis-
take of imposing crushing conditions
of peace upon Germany, in the opinion
of Prof. R. T. Crane of the political'
science department. Moreover, he pre-.
dicts that Germany will emerge from
this war with enlarged territory. The
latter has been;- his opinion since -the
beginning of the war, at which time
"it was," he says, "apparent that Ger-
man territory would be increased
whatever the outcome. If victorious,
Gerulan territory would be greater
than before; if defeated, the Austro-
Hungarian empire would be dismem-
bered.-and in the re gnment-of--peo-

Maroons Lose
tte, Ind., Nov. 2.-After

24
'ot-
ew-

hicago squad by 7-to 3. Stagg, the
!hicago mentor, used everything at
is command to put a winning score,
cross, but the plucky Purdue men foil-
d him. In the winning score Mark-
ey caught a long forward pass and
hen made a spectacular run of 20'
ards.
Chicago made its only pionts in the
rst period on a break of luck.
East Lansing, Nov. 2.- Although
he Michigan Aggies ran up against
tronger opposition in Western State
ormal, than they counted on they
anaged to come with the long enct
f a 16 to 7 score today. Kalamazoo's
ne touchdown was the result of an
.ggie fumble. The first touchdown
ime in the second quarter when
raves, Snyder, and Ferris advanceC
he length of the field on line plays
id Graves dove over for the score
'om the five-yard line. Archer kick-
I the goal.
Team Work Wins
Iowa City, Nov. .2.-Perfectly ex-
cuted forward passes and machine
ke team work, centered around a
ackfield of stars, returned Illinois
.ctor over Iowa here today by a 19
0 score.
Illinois' best performed of the day
as Sabo, a crack halfback, who scor-
I touchdowns in the third and fourth
eriods.
Fullback Lohman played the most
insistent game for Iowa, gaining
round frequently in the first two
eriods. In the last two sessions the
awkeye's offensive proved futile, the
ill staying in Iowa's territory most
- the time.
niforms for Naval Unit Received
A large consignment of uniforms
rived here yesterday for the navy.
xty came in the morning and as
any more in the afternoon. These
ill be distributed tomorrow.

ples German-Austria would be united
with the kindred Teutonic peoples of
the present German empire." The lat-
ter contingency is what is now about
to happen, Professor Crane thinks.
Germany Still to Be Great Power
"Germany will continue to be a
great power after the war," says Pro-
fessor Crane, "for the Allies will. not.
be so foolish as to make conditions so
hard that she will smart under a sense
of wrong." They will remember that
economic discrimination against the
American colonies caused them to
rebel successfully against the mother
country and that the terrific indem-
nity imposed on France in 1870 by.
Germany . accomplished nothing more
than uniting that nation in firm im-
placability toward her oppressors.
The Allies, thinks Professor Crane,
will not fail' to see that oppressive
peace- terms would simply react on
themselves.
Justice Required for Peace-
"In case general disarmament is
adopted," he says, "America, England,
and Germany will continue to be the
great world powers, now that Russia
is out of international affairs. By
world powers I mean. self sufficing,
with sufficient area for their popula-
tion. And if a general disarmament
is not adopted, the Allies will have too
much political good sense to reduce
Germany to a position of impotence.
She will be punished, of course; her
prestige will be taken away; but if
the world is to be organized for peace,
Germany must not be much worse off
than the others."
Dismemberment, Would Be Mistake
Professor Crane asserts that to dis-
member Germany, as Germany dis-
membered France and rendered her
helpless in a military sense by tak-
ing Alsace-Lorraine, would but be re-
peating Germany's mistake, that of
separating peoples 'from the rest of
their race and placing them under
foreign dominion. -

Question Put to Germans
The same information coming from,
the same sources, indicates that the
armis'tice terms as finally agreed up-
on may be known to the world Mon-
day or Tuesday, and that they will be
presented to Germany for accept-
ance in their entirety, or not at all,
without an opportunity for quivering
or prating..
From a military point of view the
proposal that the German armies be
disarmed and retired 30 miles beyond
the Rhine is classed only as tenta-
mount to an absolute surrender. It
would not only throw open to the.
American and Allied armies many
roads to Berlin, but, with the surren-
der of the railway rolling stock, it
would deprive them of means to re-
trace their steps or fight if they would.
There is some question among mili-
tary observers if such complete terms
are -necessary. Undoubtedly the ac-
tion sought, that the enemy retire 30
miles 'behind the Rhine, is to destroy
the German inner defense system.'
That system. is supported by a chain:
of fortresses, without which the line'
would be untenable, and some military
experts believe that it would not be
necessary to go. further than to de-
mand the surrender or dismantling of
these forts. - -
Wilson in Touch with Col. House
President Wilson continued today
to keep in close touch with the war
couacil at Versailles through his per-
sonal representative, Colonel House.
No one in Washington, outside of the
inner official circle, knows the exact
extent of Colonel House's powers, but
they. are believed to be very large.
They probably do net go to the extent
of authorizing the concfusion .of any
binding agreement for an armistice
or peace without approval of the
'President.
Men in Naval Unit to lie Photographed
Photographs. of all the men in the
naval unit- will be- taken, beginning
Monday. Those in uniform will be
the first to have theirs taken.

The University United War Work
campaign will be launched Nov. 11
and continue one week. During this
time everyone will be given an oppor-
tunity to contribute. This is a cam-
paign to collect funds for the war ac-
tivities of the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W.
C. A., the National Catholic War coun-
cil, (K. - of C.), the Jewish Welfare
board, the War Camp Community ser-
vice, the American Library associa-
tion, and the Salvation Army.
"Wherever you find a soldier or
sailor you find also the evidence of
the loving care of the folks back
home, expressed through the medium
of one of these seven affiliated and co-
operating organizations and contri-
buting that indefinable, indispensable
factor, morale," -is a slogan of the
eampaign. -
Beginning this week, literature ex-
plaining the campaign will be dis-
tributed. The campaign, which is for
$250,000,000, will be carried on.
throughout tie United States, and
quotas given to each department of
the country, each state, county, city,
and township having its own budget.
The universities are to carry on com-
paigns of their own. Plans have long
been under way for the student cam-
paign here. The faculty will not be
included in this as they will be taken
care of by the community committees.
Dr. Wishart to Speak Friday
The campaign among the soldiers
and sailors will be handled along mil-
itary lines, through companies and
sergeanta, and each man will be giv-
en an opportunity to contribute. The
women -will be organized through the
Women's league and the Y. W. C. A.,
and will run their own voluntary
campaign for two days. Committees
of five have been appointed from each
group, and they will use their own
speakers in publicity work. Dr. A. W.
Wishart of Grand Rapids, who has
just returned from France, will speak
Friday noon at Newberry residence
and at Martha Cook dormitory in the
evening. He will also probably meet
a group representing men of the naval
unit and S. A. T. C. at Lane hall in
the evening.
Large Committee Appointed
The University War Work campaign
committee consists of the following:
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston, president
of the Students' Christian association,
chairman; Mr. George Burke, repre-
senting the K. of C.; Mr. F. L. D.
Goodrich, of the American Linrary
association; Mr. Francis Bacon, di-
rector of the War Camp Community
service; Miss Eva Lemert, secretary.
of the Y. W. C. A.; Mrs. Edward H.
Kraus, faculty advisor of the Y. W. C.
A.; Huldah Bancroft, assistant secre-
tary of the Y. W. C. A.; Emily Loman,
(Continued on Page Four)

War Bulletins
(By the Associated Press)
Cophenhagen, Nov. 2.-The last
telegram today in Berlin from
Budapest said that sanguinary
street fighting was in progress
between Hungarian and Bosnian
troops. Since then telegraphic
communications have ceased.
With the American forces north-
west of Verdun, Nov. 2,-At 5
o'clock this evening the American
forces were in the vicinity of
Bois-des-loges, north of Thenor.
gues.
Vienna, Nov. 2.The evacua-
tion of all Italian territory by the
Austrians is imminent.
COMMISSIONS N O T
GUARANTEED NAVY
There has been a rumor around
the campus of late to the effect that
all men in the naval unit would either
receive commissions here, or would
be sent to a naval officers' training
school. The navy headquarters wishes
to state that this rumor is entirely
false. There is no guarantee that any
man here will receive a commission
or be sent to an officers' material
echool. The naval unit here is not an
officers' material school. It is an or-
,ganization for aiding University stu-
dents to obtain a knowledge of naval
organization, drill and regulations and
to aid the men in selecting the stud-
ies which will fit them for an officers'
school.
Although it is a means of preparing
peen for commissions and petty officer-
,hips, they will, have to have further
training after leaving, before they can
receive a commission. There is a
chance for men to become officers,
however. These will be selected ac-
cording to their qualifications and the
needs of the navy.

ENTENTE VESSELS ON
TRIEST; FRITZ RET.
TO NOS

FOCH SMASHES VITAL
ENEMY DEFENSE LIN
Canadians Capture Valnciennes;
S. Men "Pepper" Teuton West
of Meuse
(By the Associated Press)
Over the plains of Venetia and i
the mountain valleys of the Treni
the Italian and Allied forces pur
the demoralized Austro-Hungaria
In France, the German defenses
shaking under the assaults of
British, French and Americans. W
of the Meuse, the enemy is retir
before the Americans.
The Austrian emissaries have b
given the armistice terms of the
lies and have returned to their C
lines where the Austrian commn
has taken the terms under conside
tion.
Italian Navy Raids Pola
Meanwhile an Italian naval cot
gent has raided the great base of P
Allied war ships are on their way
Triest to take command of a situat
made serious by fleeing Austrian s
ters. The Allied ministers and dE
gates continue their deliberations o
the German armistice terms.
From west of Asiago to the Ph
the Italians are pressing into the :
portant valleys leading to Trent I
are well beyond the old Austr
frontier northeast of Asiago. Wel
the Brenta, the Italians have for
their way into the Nos valley lead
toward Grigno, while further e
they have penetrated into te Imp
tant Sugana valley, the main pa
way of the Austrians retreating fr
the Italian mountain zone. In -
Belluno area, the Italians have cr
ed the Piave near Busche, and nor
east of Belluno, are pushing up t
Cordevole.valley toward Longar
Allies Outflank Germans
On the Venetian plains Italian c
alry has crossed the Cellina-Medi
river, six miles east of the Tagliam
to, and are racing to reach the cro
ings of that river. In their adva
the cavalry overcame strong Austri
resistance in the region of Pordent
and northward. Further south
third army continues its pressure
the front immediately north of -
Adriatic. More than 80,000 'Austr
prisoners and more than 1,600 guns
ready have been counted.
Marshal Foch continues to sm
the German defenses on vital sect
in the western front. On the no
Valenciennes has been taken by -
Canadians, and the bitterly contes
town is now behind the army adva
ing toward the Franco-Belgian bord
North of Valenciennes the Brit
have Tournai within their grasp, wi
to the south the German position
Le Quesnoy is most serious. The
ture of Valenciennes and the str
position around it, military observ
(Continued on Page Four)

S. A.T.C. TO HAVE
MOVIES AND MUSIC
Movies will be furnished in Hill
auditorium for members of the naval
and military units today from 10
o'clock in the morning to 5 o'clock in
the evening, under the direction of
the War Camp Community service.
Orchestras under the direction of Earl
V. Moore, '12, and Ike Fisher and
made up of S. A. T. C. men will en-
tertain the men at the convalescent
infirmaries this afternoon.
The lower floor was filled yester-
day when the movies were first
shown. M. W. Kann played the piano
.during the movies and Captain Wil-
son's band under Sergeant Haller
played before the pictures started
showing and between reels. - Allan
Stanchfield was in charge of the mov-
ies.
The pictures to be shown today will
be different from those shown yester-
day.
Nurses of all hospitals have been
invited to attend the performance to-
day. Yesterday a large number of
nurses were taken riding by the wo-
men's motor corps.
No civilians are permitted to be
present, and only members of the mil-
itary and naval units who are in per-
fect health are allowed to go to see
the pictures.
The music at the evening presenta-
tion was furnished by an orchestra
made up of men from company 13,
under Sergeant Thomas. The picture
shown was a high class comedy star-
ring George Beban in a story of the
north woods.

WANTED: DAILY TB

Further tryouts for the e
torial and business staffs of I
Michigan Daily will begin th
week. Non-S. A. T. C. men a
particularly wanted. Men of -
itiative are wanted on the bu
ntess staff especially to hand
advertising. Those 'wishing
try out should call at the Pre
building in the afternoon.

1

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