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May 07, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-07

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TFE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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*I'1: E, UA ll SERVICE BR1'filEI
Nm"imoW YOII1( SUN

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VOL. XXVI. No. 151.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 7, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

ARSITY WLLOPS
NOTRE DAME IN
DUAL ENCOUNTER
"CAP" SMITH AND O'BRIEN TAKE
FIRST AND SECOND IN
SPRINT EVENTS
DEAD HEAT IN HALF-MILE RUN
Carroll and Donnelly Have Walk-Away
in Mile Race; Catholics Take
Two-Mile Event
Michigan yesterday proved herself
better adapted to the mudhen role than
the Notre Dame track team, and suc-
ceeded in walking all over the Catho-
lic squad. The final score showed 76
counters for the Maize and Blue, and
but 49 for Notre Dame.
Due to the prevailing weather con-
ditions, but few spectators turned out
to witness the first track gathering
in which the Varsity has taken the
host's chair this season.
Michigan treateq the visitors rather
rudely right at the outset, when Cap-
tain Smith and O'Brien finished one-
two in the century dash. The time
for this number was clocked in 10 sec-
onds flat, showing that "Hal" is back
to his regular form. From start~ to
the finish the Varsity was never head-
(Continued on Page Six)
E
LOSES RIGHT EYE
Fragment of Wood Lacerated Eyeball
WNile le Was Constructing
a Summer Home
ROVE HIMSELF TO TOWN IN AUTO
Prof. John R. Allen, of the engi-
eering college, suffered the loss of
its right eye last night as the result
f an accident which occurred at his
arm, three miles northwest of Ann
rbor, late yesterday afternoon.
Professor Allen was assisting in the
onstruction of a summer house at the
arm, and was chopping a board with
n axe when one of the pieces flew
p, striking him in the face and cut-
ing the eyeball.
Although he was nearly blinded as
result of the accident he drove him-
elf to town in his automobile, accom-
anied by an employee at the farm,
nd after consulting Dr. Dean W.
yers, was taken to Maplehurst hos-
lPal, on Fourth Avenue, where the
octor performed an operation, re-
oving the eyeball.
Professor Allen was reported to be
esting well late last night. It was
tated that complications were not
ared at present, but that it could
ot be foretold what developments
ould take place in the case.
IVE SPRING TRIP PROGRAM
lee and Mandolini Club Will Appear.
in Final Concert of Year
The last concert of the 1915-16 sea-
n of the Varsity Glee and Mandolin
ub will be given Thursday, June 1,
Hill auditorium. The same pro-
am as was given by the combined
ubs on their trip to the Pacific
ast during spring vacation will be

ndered. Among the numbers on the
ogram will be selections by the Var-
t . sextet, the Midnight Sons' quar-
t, and solos by Chase B. Sikes, '16,
d R. R. Dieterle, '18, In addition
the trip program, a skit, dramatized
om incidents which occurred on the
stern journey, will be given.
NNEY TAKES THIRD PLACE AT
RBANA; NORTHWESTERN FIRST
N. E. Pinney, '16, of Michigan, took
ird place in the Northern Oratorical
gue contest at Urbana, Illinois,
iday night. Northwestern won first
ce and Illinois was second.
orge F. Hurley Withdraws Candidacy
'tor, The Michigan Daily:.
hereby withdraw my candidacy
the office of President of the Uni-
sity of Michigan Oratorical asso-
tion.
GEORGE F. HURLEY.

Select "aterial
for May Inlander
Ineludes 'Number of Poems and Stor-
ies by Prominen Campus
Material for the May number of the
Inlander which is to appear about the
middle of the month has been finally
selected. Topics relating to student
life and activity are much in evidence,
and but one article by a member of
the faculty will be printed in the
issue.
T. Hawley Tapping, '16L, continues
his discussion of the question, "Michi-
gan Over-organization," in which he
offers a solution for remedying the
present situation. Another article by
Werner W. Schroeder, '16L, deals with
the Union, revlewing the attitudles
taken for and against it.
A story by Grace Boynton, grad.,
is said to possess an unusual merit
and is based upon Quaker life and
times. Humor is furnished in a short
story by Miriam Hubbard, '16.
Six poems have been selected for
publication, while as much editorial
comment will be printed gs before,
dealing with timely campus events
and important student interests.
Fourth Health
Lecture Tuesday
Dr. Mark Marshall Lectures on "Pat-
ent Medicines;" Try to Interest
Students in Public Health
The fourth of a series of lectures
under the auspices of the University
health service representatives will be
given Tuesday evening at 7:30 o'clock
in the amphitheater of the Medic
building by Dr. Mark Marshall, who
will speak on the subject, "Patent
Medicines."
The purpose o these talks is to
educate the student body in public
health questions and to better con-
ditions in which students are forced
to live. "
At least one representative from
each fraternity, sorority, and league
house is requested by the health serv-
ice to attend these lectures, but they
are open to everyone, and it is hoped
that a large number will attend them
as they are prepared at great pains
by the ablest men on the campus.
Each representative is requested to
communicate with Miss Helen W. Pat-
terson, secretary of the organization,
on or before Tuesday evening.
Publications lMen
Stage V all Game
Managing Editors and Business Mana-
gers form Batteries for
Contest
The annual baseball game between
the 'nrews chasers and advertising
"heelers"of The Daily staff and the
members of the staff of the Gargoyle
will be held May 15 on Ferry Field.
Although The Daily team lost last
year's game by the score of 6 to 31,
sport authorities believe that no
trouble will be experienced by the
newspaper men in gaining possession
of the loving cup put up. last year by
the Haller Jewelry Co.
According to the custom, the edi-
tors of the two publications will pitch
and the business managers will catch
for their respective teams, while the
president of the Michigan Union will

umpire. The batteries for the game
therefore will be: Daily, McKinney
and Leonard; Gargoyle, John. and Ma-
guire; Umpire, Gault.
Waldemar Alfred Paul John and
"Hal" Fitzgerald, the mainstays of the
Gargoyle team last year, will again
be in the lineup, but are thought to
be the only members of that team to
be feared, since the recent decimation
of the staff by the eligibility commit-
tee has left available material com-
paratively scarce.
The Daily team will be exception-
ally strong this year, having, beside
the batteries, such well known play-
ers as "Rodg" Sylvester, "Put'"
Wright, "Bundy" Parker, "Eddie"
Mack, and "Jimmie" Schermerhorn,
a former member of the Varsity squad.
Four More LeAders Pay Death Penalty
Dublin, May 6.--Four more prison-
ers were sentenced to death by court
martial and shot yesterday morning.

WERCANS SLAY
MANY MIECNS
IN HOT SKIRMISH
STARVING, SEMII-NUDE BANDITS
SEERR EFLTGE IN MOUN-
TAIN RECESSES
U. S. TROOPS GO UNSCATHED
Cavalry Swoops Down on Sleepilg
Yillistas, Killing 42; Many Offi-
cers Among the Dead
Dy George H. Clements, at General
Pershing's Headuqarters near Nami-
ouipa, May 6, by wireless to Columbu,
1. M., May 6.--Half clad, afoot, with
only a few revolvers remaining and
with no food, the demoralized rem-
rants of what was until yesterday the
larger band of Villiatas remaining
are seeking sanctuary in the moun-
t::ins south of Cusi Huiriachic.
At their backs are the picked troops
of the 11th Cavalry, under Major
Howse, which early yesterday at Ojo
Agules, swept over them, killing 42
and wounding many more, taking pris-
oners and horses, all without the loss
of a single American trooper. The
cavalrymen are giving the Villistas
no rest, although they have been at
it continuously now for two days.
The bandits can find no safety in the
canyons or in the thick, jnderbrush of
the mountains or the .plains.
Major Howse and a trooper were at
San Antonio, 36 mile",,orh of Ojo
Agules, Thursday evening, when word
came that Villista forces had attacked
the Carranza garrison at that point
late in the afternoon. The garrison
had held them off until nightfall, when
hostilities ceased, according to the
Mexican custom.
The American troops set out on a
36-mile dash at 88:30 in the evening,
over a country bad enough in the
daytime, but positively dangerous at
night. It was just daylight, nine hours
later, when the Americans located the
besiegers of the town bivouacked
among the adobe huts on the outskirts
and sleeping with their heads wrap-
ped in their blankets. It was on the
sleeping horde that the troops de-
scended at a dead run, the men all
yelling.
The surprise was almost complete.
There was no chance for the Villistas
to fight back. They had no time to
rush into the adobe houses and start
sniping. Only those who had heard
the alarm given by a herder got away,
but they had to go on foot. The few
who had weapons made a show of
fight after they had escaped from the
ring of death, but the cavalrymen
were after them in a little while, and
they took to flight. After two hours
of fighting the overjoyed Carranzistas
ventured from the town. They picked
up 42 dead bandits and must have
found many wounded. Among the
dead were Antonio Angeles, a cousin
of Villa's former chief of artilery,
and other officers.
The news of the battle was received
at General Pershing's headquarters
with evidence of joy. The enlisted
men speak of it now as the first re-
venge for the death of the Americans
in the battle of Temechic, April 22,
with the same band.
Receive Reply from Carranza
El Paso, May 6.-Announcement was
made in Juarez tonight that the long
expected reply had been received from
General Carranza at Mexico City, re-

garding the tentative agreement drawn
up and signed by General Scott and
General Obregon, and it was stated
on General Obregon's car that the re-
ply of the first chief was considered
satisfactory.
In a few minor details the first chief
is said to have differed with his minis-
ti of war, but that in the main the
agreement was satisfactory to the Car-
(Continued on Page Six).

Campus Societies
Get Union Rooms
building Committee Desires Organiza-
Lions to Send in Applications
at Once
All campus societies will have the
privilge of obtaining rooms in the
new Union building, which is to be
erected as soon as the million dollar
mark has been reached. Applications
for rooms should be sent to the build-
ing conmittee as soon as possible, so
that definite arrangements can be
made.1
This new plan will bring all the
campus societies in the same building,
thus carrying out the policy of the
Union in making the structui the
home of Michigan institutions and all
Michigan men.
No definite statement as to the pres-
ent amount of the Union budget can
be made, since many of the campaign
committees which conducted special
canvasses last month have not yet
turned in their reports. A chart
showing the relative standing of the
alumni centers and their contribu-
oions 'ill be made within a few days.'
Hill 304 -Goal
ofGerman Army
I 'r t ('Capture Important Position
by Bombardment With
Gas ~Shells
Paris, May 6.--A determired effort
is being made by the Crown Prnce's
army . take Hill p04, most important
heght on the west bank of the Meuse,
sout!oast of Haucourt. As a result
of the attack made yesterday, our
troops et this point were covered by
o bomibardment with gas shells, and
the G(rwans succeeded in occupying.
a pari f the French trenches on the
niorth slope of the hill. In order to
do this the Germans brought up a
fresh ivision fro-i another part of
the front
The prelimilnja'y bonbar dment
:gaInst this sector began se; eral days
ago aU continued all day yesterday.
ani last night, attaining a violence be-
fore the infantry attack last night, de-
scribed in the war office communica-
tion as inpreced ented.
BRING TOGETHER
MESSAGE INES
Secretary Daniels Transmits Orders
to All Navy Yards, Aided by
3,000 Miles of Wire
REACH FAR TO EAST AND WEST
Washington, May 6.-Aided by the
telephone, telegraph, printing tele-
phone and wireless telephone and
telegraph supplied by the American
Telephone and Telegraph company, the
United States navy at 4:00 o'clock this
afternoon mobilized the country's
forces of communications.
Dy means of the mediums named,
Secretary of the Navy Daniels, sitting
at his desk, found himself able to talk
with every navy yard in the country
on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as
well as on the Gulf of Mexico; he
found himself able to transmit formal
ord'ers by telegraph to all of them;
he f:und bulletins coming in from
zaaces like Brooklyn over the writing
telegraph, and then by means of the

wireless found himself in communica.
tion with the United States ships at
sea as far sway as Honolulu, 4,<;00
miles on one side ,and the coast of
Europe on the other.
It required 53,000 miles of the 21,-
000,000 miles of telephone wires in the
ecuntry to effect the mobilizati w, and
called for the service of 600 specially
tranled employees of the ccmpany co-
op-rat:ng with navy men.

PRESIDENT DETERMINES TO ACCEPT

GERMAN ANSWER TO NOTE; DA9NGER
OF BREAK SAID TO BE ALLEVIATED
* WILSON BELIE VESTHAT KAISER
SEITHAS YlEL)EI TO STAND
QOIIE OUT. VRESllMiI>N *T AIE L BY [a. S.

NC
K-
f
*_
4,

All freshman literary ,tu-
dents are urgently requested
to hear Professor Robert E.
Bunker speak on "Almost Soph-
omores," at 4-00 o'clock tomor-
row in the auditorium of Uni-
versity hall.
* * ** * * ** * *

FRESH LITS HEAR
PROF, RI EI BUNKER
"Almost Sophomores" to Be Subject
of Address at List Assembly
of Year
NEW PLAN PLEASES DR. SCOTT

Prof. Robert Bunker,
school, will speak before9
lit assembly of the year

of the Law
the last fresh
in University

hall at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow after-t
noon on the subject "Almost Sopho-
mores." With this meeting the as-
semblies will be discontinued for the '
balance of the year. '
Dr. J. F. Scott, who has been in 7
charge of the meetings, expressed him-{
self as being entirely satisfied with'
the results of the plan as tried out
this year. Speaking of the future for
the affairs, Dr. Scott remarked, "I be-
lieve that the freshmen assemblies
will prove of much benefit to the first ,
year classes, not only because of the.
excellent speakers who are secured,
but because the themes chosen arouse
university and class spirit and pro-1
mote a deeper interest in general cam-
pus activities."
At the meeting tomorrow D. R.
Hertz, '19, will give a number of7
readings, and the fresh lit glee club;
will be on hand to furnisn music.
C4ONSIDERIN GERJIMAN NOTE
ON IUSITANIA ANNIVERSARY
One year ago today the Lusitania
was torpedoed by a German submarine
and on the anniversary of the catas-
trophe it is expected that adecision
on Germany's note will be made.
With the sinking of the Lusitania
nearly 1,200 lives were lost, including,
more than 100 American citizens. This,'
followed by attacks on other unarmed
vessels carrying Americans, has led
to the present crisis.
Craftsmen Elect Officers for Year
At a meeting of Craftsmen, student
Masonic society last night, the follow-
ing men were elected to office: Presi-
dent, Paul Gibson ,'17P; first vice-
president, A. D. Wickett, '17M; sec-
ond vice-president, L. W. Lisle, '17L;
secretary treasurer, F. E. Curtis, '18.
WHAT'S GOING ON i
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Rain.t
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-J-lits vs. fresh lits,
baseball game, south Ferry Field.
4:00 o'clock-Prof. Robert Bunker
steaks at last fresh lit assembly, U-
hall.
7:00 o'clock--Meeting of the Edu-
cational club. Prof. A. S. Whitney
talks on "Problems of the Superintend-
ent in the Small School Systems,"
Tappan hall.
7:45 o'clock-Business and social
meeting of Michigan Dames, Newber-
ry hall.
S:00 o'clock--Dr. Max Margolis
speaks, "Translating the Scriptures,"
before the Menorah Society, Newberry
hall.

GERMAN GOOD FAITH ON TRIAL
Repor That Four Steamers 1lai W-en
Altacked Creates nfavoralie
Impression at White ilouse
Washington, May 6.-President Wil-
son has decided to accept Germany's
reply as a compliance with his demand
that illegal methods of submarine war-
fare be abandoned. The danger of a
diplomatic break is authoritatively de-
scribed as passed for the present.
The official text of the German note
wyts de-coded and laid before the
President today. It differs in no es-
sential particulars from the text which
.rached here yesterday. It will be
considered at Tuesday's cabinet meet-
in;, and it is probable that Secretary
of State Lansing will soon begin work
on a brief reply.
The President and his official ad-
visers take the view that Germany's
new orders to submarine commanders
meet his demand that =the imperial
government declare an abandonment
of illegal submarine warfare. The
President's demand that Germany was
to effect the abandonment is some-
thing that only the future can fore-
tell. Germany's good faith in carry-
ing out tihe new order is to a certain
extent placed on trial, and the United
States will judge results.
President Decided Yesterday
The President practically had made
up his mind not to reject the German
reply as soon as he read the unoffi-
cial text yesterday, It would, how-
ever, be a mistake to assume that the
President is pleased with the status
of the submarine issue or to feel that
the German reply has really settled
the submarine controversy, but he is
going to take the German promise at
its face value and trust that the sub-
marine menace to noncombatants will
actually be eliminated.
Four Submarines Attack
The President was disagreeably sur-
prised today to receive official news of
the attack by submarines on four
steamers. American - Consul-General
Skinner reported this from London,
and the State department forthwith
sent the message to the White House.
According to this report the French
schooner Benadt was sunk by subma-
rine 150 miles from land. Eight of the
crew have been picked up by boats.
Twenty-six are still adrift and their
fate is unknown,
Americans on Board?
There are no advices as to whether
any Americans were on board.
The British steamer Raubon was
also sunk by a submarine. All details
are lacking, even the place where the
attack occurred. The British steamer
Clan McFadden was damaged by a sub-
marine in the Bay of Biscay, and the
Norwegian ship Mars was set on fire
by a submarine May 2.
It was stated emphatically at the
State department this afternoon that
the United States would not consider
Germany's declaration effective until
time has been granted for orders to
be issued to all submarine command-
ers. The United States insists that
the orders must be effective now. Con-
sequently an unfavorable impression
has been made by Mr.. Skinner'N re-
l ort, although offieials suspend judg-
ment until the facts are learned. It
is probable the investigation will be
begun as usual. Tne President, how-
ever, is not pleased at the outlook
of having to investigate further sub-
marine attacks which appear to be
illegal before he has even had time to
stuay the German pledge to climinate
them.

Marks Leaves to Attend Convention
James 11. Marks, '48E, head of the
department of buildings and grounds
of the university, leaves this morning
for Madison, Wis., to attend a three-
day convention of the National Asso-
ciation of Superintendents of Build-
ings. The association is at present
composed only of superintendents of
buildings and grounds of mid-west-
ern universities. The 1915 .convention
was held in Ann Arhn r.

First Methodist Church
State Street, Corner of Washington
A. W. STALKER, D. D., MINISTER
REV. LITTL EJOHN
WILL BE IN CHARCE OF THE
MORNING SERVICE, 10:30 and EVENING SERVICE, 7:30

U-NOTICES
Fresh lit baseball practice Monday
at 3:00 o'clock.
Closing of qualifying round iI golf
tournament Monday afternoon.

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