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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICH1GAN DAILY

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HATS
HATS
HATS
HATS

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HATS
HATS
HATS
HATS

Go
S
To
DRUGS
KODAKS

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rr

To Calkins'
For
Ada Water
Thirty Years the Ilest
CANDY
alkins' Pharmacy SODA

M

See us when you want music,

records,

Q

ALLMENDINGER
Music Shop

A1

musical instruments and Supplies
COLUMBIA RECORDS
Will play on your Phonograph
They outlast all others and cost less
Best Dance Records $1.00
Popular Song Hits 65c and 75c

324 South State Street

I

We are showing the latest styles in Suits, Top Coats
Sport Coats, Hats, Caps and Furnishings
Wadhams & Co.'s Corner
Main & Washington Sts.

. . .

THE MAY
UNDERMUSLIN
SALE.

Be
Attractively
Dressed
and gain the admiration of all
by having your next suit

9-,

Individually
Custom Tailored

by

ARTHUR F. MARQUARDT
Campus Tailor
516 East William St. Phone 1422-J

'THIS splendid annual event
is here again with practi-
cally every n e w design in
c o o 1, summery undergar-
ments, including the fine silk
garments that women delight
to wear during May and the
vacation months following.
Take the gown group as an
instance of the extraordinary
values:
$1.oo and $1.25 Muslin Gowns
in slip-over and high neck styles;
trimmed with tucks and cm-
broidery....... .... 79c
$1.35 to $1.50 Muslin Gowns in
many new styles, including round,
square or veenekeks, slip-overs,
kdimlonos, high n ecks andempli rrs
lace and embroiderv ~trimmed
at. ................... .. 95c
$1.69 and $1.73 Muslin Gowns
trimmed with exquisite French
embroidery and laces.... $1.29
$1.98 to $2.50 Gowns of sheerest
muslin, elaborately trimmed $1.79
$2.69,to $3.00 Mtuslin Gowns'Of
extraordinary beauty .G $1.98
$4.50 Tub Silk Gowns in empire
styles, ribbon trimmed... $3.19
$6.oo Crepe de Chine Gownus in
slip-over styles: daintily finished
with. plaid French hems. $4.98
$8.oo Crepe de Chine Gowns
elaborately trimmed with lace and
lace insertion $5.98
(SecondFloor)
GRAND RAPIDS CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS AT FINAL-MEETING
At the final business meeting of the
Grand Rapids club for this semester,
the following officers were elected:
President, Charles Breitung, '17E;
secretary, Paul L. Steketee, '18; vice-
president, Alvin Loucks, '18.
Ralph Conger, '14, president of the
alumni association in Grand Rapids,
spoke of the ,relations between the
alumni and the Grand Rapids club,
and in discussing plans for bringing
men to Michigan, outlined the idea
of holding an ahnual banquet before
the opening of college in the fall, at
which all prospective Michigan men
would receive suggestions for their
first year in college.

JUNE 2 SET FOR
Parade of Classes, Red Fire, Bonfire,
and Speeches by Prominent
Men, on Program
STUDENT COUNCIL IN CHARGE
"Cap Night," when the freshmen at-
tain sophhood by throwing their caps
into a blazing fire, will be held Fri-
day night, June 2, in Observatory
Hollow. This announcement has just
been made by the Student Council,
which will have charge of the affair.
The celebration will be held two
weeks after the spring contests, as
in past years, and several prominent
alumni speakers, as well as the usual
faculty and student speakers, will be
secured for the occasion.
According to the tradition, the four
classes will meet at designated places
on the campus, the seniors wearing
their. caps and gowns. Led by the
Varsity band, the various classes will
fall in line, and the procession will
start down State street and over to
Ann. From there it will move east
to the big natural amphitheater, in
which a brilliant fire will be burn-
ing. The procession will be lighted
by the sophomores, who will burn red
lights along the entire course of the
march.
Upon arriving at the hollow, the se-
niors and juniors will take the high-
er seats, while the second year and
first year men will be seated in front
of the upperclassmen, the freshmen
being nearest the fire.
After the program of speeches and
class singing, and after the big flash-
light has been taken, the freshmen will
circle the fire in single file and throw'
the grey emblems of their class into
the blaze. The classes will then again
form the line of march in its original
order for the return to the campus.
Carl Guthe, '14, on Trip to Peru
Carl Guthe, '14, is one of the mem-'
hers of the archeological expedition
sent by Andover Academy to excavate
the ruined pueblos of Peru. During
his trip from Harvard to Santa Fe, he1
stopped over for a short visit at his'
home in this city.

MAKEPLANS FOR
FORESTRY EXHIBIT
Six Rooms in New Science Building
to Show Characteristics of
Department Work
TO TAKE PLACE MAY 18 and 19
Plans are practically completed for
the exhibit to be given by the Forestry
department on May 18 and 19, for
those attending the May Festival. Six
rooms of the New Science building
have been chartered by the department
this year. Through lack of space, the
foresters in past years have been un-
able to give a very elaborate exhibit,
but this objection has been removed
this year, with the result that the com-
mittees in charge of the affair, with
R. H. Easterbrook, '15, as general
chairman, hope to make this exhibit
the best ever given by the department.
It will be divided into six parts, each
par.t showing the characteristics of
that subdivision.
In room 427, will be the Utilization
and Products exhibit under R. F.
Griefe, '16. A large model will show
what happens to the logs through the
different logging operations and how
it comes out the finished product.
In room 214 will be the Silviculture,
Grazing and Products exhibits. They
will be featured by three models, one
showing a well-regulated forest with
telegraph linesrtelephone posts, look-
out stations, roads, etc., made after
the famous silviculture model at the
World's Fair in San Francisco, an ero-
sion model will show the different ef-
fects of erosion on timber, and the
third model will show a well-regulated
system of cutting trees. These exhi-
bits will be in charge of E. L. Dem-
mend, '14, L. C. Staudt, '16, and W. E.
Bond, '14.
The Mensuration and Dendrology ex-
hibits will be held in room 425, under
the supervision of W. C. Homer, '16,
and G. M. Hoak, '16.
Room 120 will be fitted up to rep-
resent a true forester's camp, under
direction of M. I. Bradner, '16, and
the room next to it will be used to
show the advantages of testing timber
at frequent intervals. Clyde Bastian,
'16, will have charge of this portion
of the exhibit.
Moving pictures showing forest-fire
fighting, logging operations, and other
interesting things pertaining to for-
estry have been procured by A. E.
Weislander, grad., from the Conserva-
tion Commission in New York.~ These {
pictures will be thrown on the screen
every afternoon and evening of the
exhibits. Souvenirs have been pur-
chased by W. E. Jotter, '16, and will
be given to all visitors.
Room 429 will be set aside as a
rest room.
It is the plan of the committee to
have the visitors enter at the east
entrance of the building, where an
information bureau will be installed.f
Guides will be stationed at that point
to escort the visitors through the
building and explain the exhibits to
them.
Total Enrollment 7214 Instead of 7962I
Through an error, the entire en-
rollment in the university, including
that of the last summer school, was
published in last Sunday'ssDaily as
7962. The correct number is 7214.'
Taxi 2255, open under new manage-'
ment. tf

WE MAKE OUR OWN CANDIES OUT OF
THE PUREST AND BEST MATERIALS

Phone 1692 F 1-

U1
The winning team is on its toes every inning
of the game. Strong bodies and keen brains
battling for an opening. Nerve and endurance
are required here as well as muscle, speed and
skill. The most important food in developing
these is

122 E. Liberty

LUNCHES, CANDIES, HOT SU
AT THE
SUGAR BOWL
109 SOUTH MAIN STREET

SAY RELIGION SHOULD
Ozora Davis i "Y" Arcade Meeting
Points Out the Value of Relig.
ion to the College Man
"In order to get at the real func-
tion of religion," said Ozora Davis,
at the "Y" meeting in the Arcade
theater Sunday evening, "you must
take it into the laboratory and into
your study with you, and make it
help solve your most difficult prob-
lems."
"The Function of Real Religion in
the Daily Life of a College Man," was
the topic which Mr. Davis chose for
his address. In his short heart-to-
heart talk he told the audience just
what religion should mean to a col-
lege student and how much it could
help him in his every day tasks if he
would only let it.
In conclusion Mr. Davis said that
religion should be of great help in
forming the right kind of personal
friendships and also in shaping a
young man's ideals. He dwelt short-
ly on the present war situation in
Europe and its relation to the con-
ditions now prevalent in the United
States.
Patronize Daily Advertizers. **

This body-building whole wheat food has played no
small part in winning victories on field and diamond
and cinder track. It is the stuff that muscle is made
of-it fits a man to play the game-and derive the ut-
most benefit and enjoyment from it. Easy to digest,
delicious to eat, it furnishes the maximum of nutrition.
Its flavor is always fresh and new. Try a bowl for
lunch or supper; eat it regularly at breakfast. Served
with milk or cream, or combined with fruit or berries.
"There is health and strength in every shred"

I

HOSPITAL NOTES

I

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

Niagara Falls, N. Y

E. H. Waite, '16, is confirfed to the
medical ward of the University hos-
pital with acute jaundice.
M. F. Smallpage, '18, and G. M. Hoak,
'16, are confined to the contagious
ward with scarlet fever.
C. C. Hyde, '16M, was discharged
this morning from the contagious
hospital.
L. C. Boynton, '16, is confined to the
contagious hospital with diphtheria.
W. G. McLeod, '16, was sent to the
contagious ward this morning.
John Neumann, '17E, who has not
been in school since spring vacation,
is sick with scarlet fever at his home
in Detroit.
Zoological Journal Club Meets Tonight
A chemical program will be rendered
at the Zoological Journal club meeting

w-

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NEWSPAPER WANTS GOOD MEN
Editor of Grand Rapids Press Tells
of Newspaper Transition
The old order of things is changing
rapidly, acording to Mr. Arthur C.
Stace, managing editor of the Grand
Rapids Press, who yesterday deliver-
ed a talk before the classes in jour-
nalism on the subject, "What the
Press Expects of its Men." No longer
is the ideal newspaperman the long-
haired Bohemian, who, pipe in mouth,
lounges about after the news, printing
the "story" no matter whom it helps
or hurts.
"We want men of character, and
men of energy," said Mr. Stace, "and
men who bear in mind the things that
are going to help the people. More
than once we have had to weigh the
consideration whether to print a good
sensational story, or whether the;
printing would do more harm than
good to those concerned.
"We want men who can hand in
good, clean copy, who can become en-
thusiastic over any story they are
sent out to get. After all, the 'nosel
for news' is only the ability to be-
come intensely interested over any
new thing that is called to your at-
tention."

CHICAGO LAWYERS TO LECT

Give Daily Talks in

Law Building

'This Week

at 7:15 o'clock tonight in
Natural Science building.
Prof. M. Gomberg will
"Some Work in Organic
Bearing on Biology," Prof.
will review a book by
"Chemical Phenomena of
discussion will be led by
Bartlett.
t.

room Z231,
speak on
Chemistry
O. C. Glaser
Czapek on
Life." The
Prof. H. H.

Four lectures on particular phases
of the work of the trial lawyer are
being given by members of the Chi-
cago Society of 'Advocates this week
in Room C of the Law building. The
Chicago Society of Advocates was
formed for the purpose of reviving in-
terest in the work of the trial law-
yer. The men who will speak are
all trial lawyers of eminence in Chi-
cago.
The lectures will be divided into
two parts with a 10 minute intermis-
sion. The program is as follows:
May 1, "The History and Nature of
the Art of Advocacy," by Eugene E.
Prussing, '78; May 2, "Jury Trials,"
by Fletcher Dobyns; May 4, "Parlia-
mentary and International Cases,"
by John M. Zane, '84; May 5, "Cases
on Appeal," by Albert M. Kales. The
lectures will start at 4:00 o'clock.
H. C. Perkins Loses Barns In Fire
Fire broke out yesterday afternoon
in the barns belonging to H. C. Per-
kins, on the River road just outside
of the city limits. The new fire truck
made a run to the fire and while un-
able to save any Of the outer buildings,
successfully kept the flames from the
house. One horse was lost in the
fire.
Walsh. Taxi Line, Phone 2255. tf

Patronize Daily advertisers.

*I

WA TEDI
WANTED-Five men to make $4501
each during summer vacation. E. B.

WANTED I

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WANTED-Students
Sanitary Brushes.

to sell Nibco
Best proposition

Houseman. 528
2132-M.

N. State. Phone
a3Om 2,3

WANTED-Couple
mer work. Call
George Watkins,
2151.

studentsafor sum-
tonight after 6:30.
206 Glenn. Phone
m2

on campus. Phone Cotton-373-W,
Simpson-2180-M; Yeisley, 2494.
FOUND
FOUND-Fountain pen in New Sci-
ence building. Owner may have
same by proving property and pay-
ing for this advertisement. Kunkel,
307 S. Division. m2

Our Line of Pianos are Leaders
STEINWAY, KNABE, SOHMER, CRINNELL
BROS., (own make) VOSE & SONS,
STERLING, "AEOLIAN" PLAYER
PIANOS!

Years of experience in producing tone qualities
Artistic Case Designs!
GRINNELL BROS. Music House.
116 ;So. Mat'St. Pbone 1707

Call 830 for saddle ponies.

tf

III~

_I

Bicycles and Repairing at Right
Prices. Switzer's Hardware. tu,frisat

- m

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all

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