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October 20, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-20

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hTHE WLDA IPhones:-Editorial41
NEWS OFTIE .WORLD AND TELEGRAPHSERVICET6Y
THE CAMPUS e IEW YORK SUN
VOL XXVI. No. 14, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1915. PRICE FIVE C

S

MTO DELIGHTS
BIG; AUDIENCE BY
SUPERB RE1NITION
DIFFICULT PROGRAM EMBIACES
SONGS GIVEN IN FOUR
LANGUAGES
LlSTENERS.SLOW TO RESPOND
Italian Folk Songs Prove Favorites;
Singer Displays Great Ver-
satility
By a superb rendition of a most
difficult program, which embraced
songs in English, French, German and
Italian, Pasquale Amato won for him-
self a perpetual place in the hearts
of Ann Arbor music lovers last even-
ing.
Hill auditorium held nearly a ca-
pacity house, and while the audience
was a little slow in appreciating at
first the work of the artist, enthusi-
asm was not long delayed.
The program was not so brilliant
as some expected it to be, but the ver-
satility which the great Italian dis-
played by this well executed depart-
ure from the more strident work in
which he has been heard in Ann Ar-
bor before proved beyond doubt the
finish which he has attained.
It was not until "Fetes Galantes"
was sung that the audience gave Sig-
nor Amato a hearty applause. As an
encore to this, he offered "Si Tu Le-
vais, by Koechlin. "Lungi Dal Caro
Beno" was well received, and repeat-
ed. The martial melody, "All' Ac-
quisto Di Gloria," also found favor.
The "Chanson De Mephistopheles,"
which was more in the vein in which
Amato is best known here, ended the
first half of the program, and drew
two encores, "La Donna Russa," from
"Fedora," and "Jeunes Fillettes," by
Wecherlin
After the intermission Signor Ama-
to sang English and French songs
with somehat indifferent response
from his listeners until the light old
French melody, "Le Beau Sejour."
This was applauded, and in return
the song was repeated.
The Italian folk songs drew gen-
erous applause, and the last of the
group, "Tu Nun Me Vuo Chiu Bene,"
was followed by two encoures n which
Signor Amato sang "Cavatina," from
"The Barber of Seville," and his other
well-known favorite, the Prologue
from "Pagliacci."
Outside of the last two, named,
whi hhe does better perhaps than
any other artist, his rendition of Bala-
kir w's beautiful love song, "Viens
Pr~┬žs De Moi," was one of the most
peasing of the evening.
After such a performance it is dif-
ficult to criticize. Signor Amato was
( without doubt as near to perfection as
any living baritone will ever come.
1 Guiseppe Bamboscheck accompanied
Signor Amato on the piano, and did
exceptionally well.
MICHIGAN UNION "MIXES
EM UP" ALL OVER UNITED
STATES, EVEN PHLIPPINES
The Michigan Union is not only
"mixing 'em up at Michigan," to quote
Mark Sullivan in an editorial in a
recent issue of Collier's, but it is mix-

ing 'em up all over the United States,
in the Hawaiian Islands, and even as
far away as the Philippines.
Today at 12:30 o'clock graduates of
the University of Michigan will break
bread and talk over old times in 11
cities, from Boston in the east to San
Francisco in the west, as well as in
Manila. That is what the Union is
doing to keep the Michigan alumnus
from losing his university spirit.
On Thursday and Friday alumni
dinners will be held in still another
long list of cities just as widely dis-
tributed.
The program generally includes a
certain amount of speech-making, and
often these speeches are given by men
who do not happen to be members of
the organizations, but who are im-
portant and, who have something of
genuine value to say.
Another feature of these dinners is
that they are open to anyone who has
(Continued on Page Six)

CHAMAN WILL RESIGN FOREIGN
DEAN 1LOYD FORCED TO GIVE UP FLEES
CH AIRMANSHIP 1F COMMITTEE
ON STUi)ENT AFFAiRS

'1

i

Prof: Alfred H. Lloyd, new dean of
the Graduate school, will resign his
l:a :Lor as chairman of the standing
CC ami.,t ou student affairs, as soon
as l "c-ie it Harry B. Hutchins ap-
points his successor.
The announcement is not unexpect-
ed as it has been generally believed,
for the past few days, that the pres-
sure of Professor Lloyd's duties as
dean, in addition to his several classes
would seriously interfere with his
work on the committee, which is one
of the most important in the univer-
sity.
As President Harry B. Hutchins will
not return to the city from Easton,
Pa., until Friday, it is thought that a
successor to Dean Lloyd will not be
chosen until the first of next week.
UINION MEMBERSHIP
CAMP iGN STRTED
S9 Yearly Memberships and Four Life
Memberships Added in First
Night's Work
FULL COMMITTEE OUT TONIGHT
At the close of the first day of the
Michigan Union house-to-house mem-
bership campaign last night, 89 yearly
memberships and four life member-
ships were reported sold by 50 mem-
bers of the committee who carried on
the work. The campaign opened last
night with a smoker, where the mem-
bers of the committee were given lists
of prospective members, and instruc-
tions in regard to conducting the cam-
paign.
Chairman David R. Ballentine, '16,
of the membership committee, in com-
ienting on the first night's returns,
said last evening" that on account of
the Choral Union concert a large num-
ber of the prospective members had
not been approached. An especial ef-
fort will be made to see these men
tonight and make up for the handicap
due to the conflicting dates last even-
ing. Only one-third of the member-
ship committee reported at the Union
last night at the opening of the cam-
paign, and the entire committee is
asked to report at 6:45 tonight. All

How would you like to stand 20 feet
from an exploding German shall, sep-
arated from it by only a picket fence,'
and lose your hearing for two days
as a result of the explosion? That
is but one of the many experiences of
Stanley L. Orzechowski, '18E, who has
been in this country two months, after
being ten months in the war zone and
four months getting out of Europe.
"At the time the Germans made{
their first drive toward Warsaw from
the west," said Orzechowski, "I was,
on my way from my home in the town
of Mogilnica to Warsaw, which lies
40 miles to the east. I was going to
say good-bye to one of my brothers,
who had been ordered to join the Rus-
sian army. On the way I met a Ger-
man scouting party of 18 men, who
had forced a body of Russian Cossacks
to retreat into the woods. They asked
me where I was going, but as I was
a civilian they let me go on. I did
not know that the German front would
soon be between Mogilnica and War-
saw, within eight miles of Warsaw,
and that I would not see my family
for two months. I went to Warsaw

STUDENT
WAR ZONE
-o
and then to Moscow. When the Rus-
sians regained the country around
Mogilnica I returned home."
With the coming of spring the Rus-
sians were driven back by the sec-
ond drive of the Germans and Aus-
trians, and were forced to burn Mo-
gilnica before the eyes of the inhab-
itants. "After the retreat and the
burning of the town," said Orzechow-
ski, "I went with others to Moscow,
thence to Petrograd, and to New
York via Stockholm and Christiania~
I made the trip alone."
Orzechowski says that at the be-
gining of the war the Russian Poles
fought in the Russian army, the Ger-
man Poles with the Germans, and
those from Austrian Poland with the
Austrians;. but since then an addi-
tional army of Poles has been organ-
ized against Russia. According to
Orzechowski, most of the people are
opposed to Russia and would rather
see the Germans win.
After the completion of his course
in mechanical engineering, Orzechow-
ski will return to Poland, where he
will practice his profession.

reports will be turned in at
at 10:00 o'clock.

the desk

'-I

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODiAY
Peer Gynt, Hill auditorium, 7:45 and
8:45 o'clock.
Warthin Sex lecture, West medical
amphitheater, 7:30 o'clock.
Tryouts for Alpha Nu, 4:00 to 6:00
o'clock, room 401, U hall.
Tryouts for Oratorical association
play, U7 hall, 2:00 to 3:00 o'clock.
Freshman engineers' assembly, room
348, engineering building, 11:00
o'clock.
Senior architect election, room 311, en-
gineering building, 5:15 o'clock.
Junior architect election, room 311, en-
gineering building, 4:30 o'clock.
Sophomore architect election, room
311, engineering building, 4:00
o'clock.
Keystone State club business meeting,
Michigan Union, 4:00 o'clock.
Senior engineer election, room 348 of
the engineering building, 3:00 to
5:45 o'clock.
Dean Bates speaks to fresh laws, room
C of the law building, 3:00 o'clock.
Glee club, first tenor tryouts, school
of music, 4:15 o'clock.
Sophomore lit election, corridor U
hall, 1:00 to 4:00 o'clock.
rj[TOrmn11ROW
Senior engineer assembly, room 348,
engineering building, 10:00 o'clock.
Junior engineering assembly, room
348, engineering building, 9:00
o'clock.
Sophomore engineer assembly, room
348, engineering building, 8:00
o'clock.
Colorado club smoker, Union, 7:45
o'clock.
Glee club rehearsal, Adelphia rooms,
U hall, 7:10 o'clock.
Hon. G. H. Putnam speaks in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, 7:45 o'clock.
Warthin Sex lecture, West medical
amphitheater, 7:30 o'clock.
Catholic Students' club, St. Thomas
hall, Thursday, 8:00 o'clock.

UNITED STATES TO
RECOGNIZE MEXICO
State Department Recognizes Rule of
Carranza as De Facto Gov-
ernment
ISSUE NE W EMBARGO ON ARMS
Washington, Oct. 19.-The rule of
Venustanio Carranza was today rec-
ognized by the state department as
the de facto government of Mexico.
With this action diplomatic relations
between the United States and Mex-
ico will be renewed immediately.
This day was set aside for the actual
extension of recognition by the rep-
resentatives of those governments
acting with Secretary Lansing in the
Pan-American peace conference.
An embargo of arms to those fac-
tions that are struggling against Car-
ranza will go into effect immediately.
It is expected that within 48 hours
President Wilson will issue the new
embargo proclamation.
New York, Oct. 19.-A reply from
Carranza received here today to the
inquiry regarding the prosecution of
Catholics in Mexico states that at no
time has the constitutional govern-
ment of Mexico tolerated persecution
of any organization. The dispatch
further states that he will uphold the
laws of Mexico to the letter in regard
to religious toleration. The Catholic
clergy have left Mexico in fear of
prosecution following the charge of
giving financial aid to the forces un-
der Huerta, and Villa.
HEGEDUS, VIOLINIST, MAKING
FIRST TOUR OF AMERICA
Ferencz Hegedus, the Hungarian
violinist in the United States for his
first American tour this season, has
been acclaimed by the foremost crit-
ics of Germany as one of the most
remarkable interpreters of Beethoven
before the public today.
Both in New York and on tour Hege-
dus will offer at various times a spe-
cial program of the less known of the
collection of 10 Beethoven sonatas for
violin and piano. This will give vio-
lin lovers a chance to hear other than
the much played Kreutzer and C mi-
nor sonatas, and an opportunity to
familiarize themselves with these
masterpieces.

Yancey Altsheler Elected
Margaret Bassett 'and
Whelan Win

SCHEDULE OF TODAY'S VOTING
Kemp Burge was elected president
of the junior literary class at the
class election yesterday afternoon..
The. remainder of the successful can-
didates were as follows: Vice-presi-
dent, Margaret Bassett; secretary,
Gladys Whelan; treasurer, Yancey
Altsheler; football manager, Thomas
Oglethorpe; track manager, Franklin
Randall; baseball manager, Hoba~rt
Birmingham; basketball manager,
William N'ewton; oratorical delegate,
Earl Pardee.
Fresh laws yesterday nominated G.
D. Clapperton to run against William
D. Mathews for the presidency of the
class in the place of James M. Bar-
rett, who withdrew from candidacy.
C. J. Newland was nominated to op-
pose R. J. Hall for treasurer in the
place of James Thomas, withdrawn,
and E. D. Crumpacker was chosen a
candidate for oratorical delegate to
run against J. E. Ryan in the place
of Glen Coulter, who also withdrew.
The list of candidates,aas revised, is
as follows President, G. D. Clapper-
ton and William Mathews; vice-presi-
dent, W. W. Jenkins and L. H. Smith;
secretary, David L Hubar and E. D.
Patrick; treasurer, R. J. Hall and C.
J. Newland; football manager, Gerald
Hagar and E. M. Johnstone; track
manager, George F. Hurley and F. R.
Snyder; basketball manager, A. F.
Paley and C. L. Strauss; oratorical
delegate, E. D. Crumpacker and J. E.
Ryan. The election will take place
from 2:45 to 4:30 o'clock this after-
noon in room B, law building.
The following elections also will be
held today:
Senior architects, 5:15 o'clock, room
311, engineering building.
Junior engineers, 5:00 to 6:00
o'clock, 'room 348, engineering build-
ing.
Junior medics elect president and

Treasurer;
Gladys

'EMP BURGE HEADS

FINAL ENROLLMENT
FIGURES SHOW 5809
TOTAL IN UNIVRSITY
Number, Including Names Counted
Twice, of Students Entered in
Combined Courses, is 5,0
SHOWS 344 GAIN OVEI FIGURES
FOR SAME TIME LAST YEAR
LITERARY COLLE( C2E1'AS GREAT-
EST GAIN WITH 124; LAW
SCHOOL DECREASES 69
* * * * * 4 * ** * * * *
* *
* Final Enrollment Figures *
*
* Year *
* Now Ago Gain *
* Literary........2874 2550 324 *
* Eng. and Arch..1495 1491 4 *
* Law school .... 427 496 *69 *
* Dental school .. 354 305 49 *
* Medical school . 324 307 17 *
* Graduate school 254 241 13 *
* Pharmacy....... 116 100 16 *
* Homeop. Med... 60 70 *10 *
* -- -- -- *
* Total.........5904 5560 344 *
* Less names *
* counted twice *
* in combined *
* courses.......95
* -- -*
* Grand total...5809 *
* _ _*
* *Decrease *
* *
Final enrollment figures given out
by university authorities show that
5,809 persons are now enrolled in the
university, deducting the number who
are taking combined courses. The to-
tal, including names counted twice, is
5,904 which is a gain of 344 over the
figures for the same time last year.
The literary college shows by far
the greatest gain, that of 324 persons.
The law school shows the largest de-
crease, 69 less being enrolled than at
the same time last year. The homeo-
pathic medical school is the only
other college to show a decrease, but
60 persons having enrolled, against 70
last year. The decline in both of these
registration figures is to be accounted
for by the new preparatory plan for
entrance in these schools.
All the other schools show increases
ranging from a gain of 49 in the den-
tal school to an increase of but 4 in
the colleges of engineering and archi-
tecture.
In the college of pharmacy more
than one-half of the students are pur-
suing four-year courses.
In the literary college 35 per cent
of the students are women, as against
33 per cent last year, while the dental
,college reports the largest freshman
class in its history, despite a material
increase in fees.
STUDENT COUNCIL MAtW
ACT ON_ SPIRIT SHOWN
Unsportsmanlike Attitude Which Ap-
peared on Campus Cause
for Alarm

l
i

baseball manager, 11:00 o'clock,
phitheater, general hospital.

LORD GEORGE ACT
A 9N FOR SHORT WHI
ASSUMES POSITION OWING
ILLNESS OF PREMIER
ASQUITH
SINK EIGHT GERMAN BO
Serbians Receive Setback at Ham
Bulgarians in North and
Southeast
London, Oct. 19.-Owing to the
ness of Premier Asquith, Lloyd Ge
miniser of munitions, today
his place as the temporary head o
British cabinet. Asquith's illness
the resignation of Sir Edward Ca,
yesterday, have brought matters,
critical stage in the cabinet.
Lord George proved himself m
of the situation, however, and had
swers for all of the questions hu
at him in regard to the Dardan
campaign, the situation in the Ball
and the position of Italy. Ths
shows the extreme unrest of the:
isters.
A number of changes to be a
son in the cabinet is the expects
of government circles at present.
of the changes will be the estab'
ment of a new ministry of recrui
resulting from the recent difficu
experienced in supplying men for
army.
Another re-arrangement will be
elimination of Winston Churc
who is anxious to get back to
army. He is now a colonel in the
ford Yeomanry, but it is expected
he will be given 4 staff position.
F. E. Smith, formerly of the p
bureau, will be asked to fill the
cancy left by the resignation of
Edward Carson, according to ru
here today.
Sink German Steamers
Copenhagen, Oct. 19 .-0Advices
ceived here today state that e
German steamers have been sun
the Baltic Sea by British submari
Serbs Suffer Reverses
London, Oct. 19.-Dispatches f
Berlin today indicate that the
vians have suffered severe reve
both in the north and the south
In the north, where they are fi
ing the Austrians and Germans,
have been compelled to retreat..
Servian troops along the Save i
have retreated towards Lazarevat
the southeast. T.hey still hold p
tions dominating the region 'arc
Semendria, however.
To the southeast, iWhere the S
are engaged with the Bulgarians,
also have suffered defeats. A dlsp
from Vienna says that the Bulgar
have advanced 15' kilometei's.

am-I

Junior architects, 4:30 o'clock, room
311, engineering building.'
Soph lits, 1:00 to 4:00 o'clock, cor-
ridor of University hall.
Soph architects, 4:00 o'clock, room
311, engineering building.
Fresh engineers, 11:00 o'clock, room.
348, engineering building.
(Continued on Page Six)

J. C. B. Parker1
An unsportsmanlike spirit, quite dif-
ferent from the genuine Michigan
spirit, was in evidence at the CaseI
game, in the opinion of many students
who attended the contest last Satur-
day. The derisive remarks and gen-
eral conduct of a large number of un-
dergraduate rooters have been viewed
with alarm by many students on the
campus, who believe that the exam-
ple of Saturday is but the evidence
of an unfortunate spirit which has
cropped out in several different place
on the campus this fall.
The feeling that this spirit should
be stamped out has swept the campus
to such an extent that members of the
student council have decided to take
definite action in the meeting of the
council Thursday night. Just what
course of procedure the council will
adopt has not been intimated, but it
is believed that that body will leave
no stone unturned in its attempt to
eradicate all such elements of poor
sportsmanship as were present at the
Case game.
A plan has been suggested to lay
the matter before as large a number'
(Continued on .Page Six)

have occupied the heights of
Percin and Badin Zub.
Italians Repulse Austriaj
Paris, Oct. 19.-A report r,
here today states that the A
attempt to recapture the hei;
Prezasisa, which has been held
Italians, has been repulsed.
Another dispatch today statg
an Italian squadron left today
near east, and it is thought that
be used to blockade Bulgaria
ports.
NOTFI) LECTURER WILL SF
SUNDAY AT METHODIST CI
Dr. Fosdick to Appear in Lboc
pit; David Starr Jord n Sp
October 31
Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdic
noted preacher, will speak un,
auspices of the Wesleyan guild
o'clock Sunday evening in, the
odist church. His subject v
"Through Character to God."
Dr. Fosdick is -a professor al
Theological seminary of NevA
City. He is unquestionably on
most brilliant preachers of t
He has served at many of the
universities throughout the c
among them being Yale, Pr
Cornell, Chicago and Amhers
the past 11 years he has beer
of the First Baptist church o
clare, N. J.
A week from Sunday even
David Starr Jordan, the chant
Leland Stanford Jr. universi
speak on "The Last Cost of

HILL AUDITORIUM
TONIGHT at 7:30

"PEER

GYNT"

With the great English actor
CYRIL MAUDE

Tickets 25c

Earl Moore will play the Organ

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