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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r

>ur Ease of Mind
Self-possession and personal effici-
y depends largely upon the clothes you wear.
eve are your tailors you will always have that
ing that comes with
Clothes of Character
G. H. WILD COMPANY
DIN MERCHAN TAILORS STATE ST.

rennis Rackets
We are the Agents for the
SLOTTED THROAT RACKETS,
Rackets Restrung In Three Days
SHE HAN'S
STUDENTS BOOKSTORE
ETROIT UNITED LINES TRY
n Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.S
in n Eastern time, one hour faster
Limited and Express Cars--8:Io a. For Atarm Clocks and Michigan Pins
ourly to 7:0 p. M., 9:)0 p. 1. 113 SO. MAIN STREET
zoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. in. and
o hours to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,.
t1..

ars, Eastbound-5 :35 a. n., 6:40 a. M.,
., and every two hours to 7 :05 P. iM.,
.9:o5 p. in., i0:5o p. mi. TO Ypsi-
8:48 a. m.daily except Sunday),
., 12:o p.s n., 6:05 p. !n., 11:45 p.
a. mn., t1:20a. Ill.
ars, Westbound-6:12 a. in., 7:So a.
very two hours to 7:50 p. M., 10:20
:2o a. m.

Our "Tailor-Made" Clothes Cost No More
Than the Average "Ready-Made"
CAN SLE, The Tailor
108 E. Washington St Second Floor

C,.I-AN NDAIL
Official newspaper at the Univenity of4
Michigan. Published every morning exe*t
Monday duriing the university year.
Entered at te post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Francis. P. McKinney...Managing Editor
John S. Leonard......... Business Manager
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. -Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, -$2.by Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students Supply
Store, The Delta, cor. Pacard and tat.
Phondes: Business, 960 Editorial, 2414E
Communications not to exceed -oo words in
length, or notices of events will be published
in The Daily. if left at.the office in the Ann
Arbor Press 'Bdg., or in the notice box in the
west corridor of the general library, where
the notices are -collected at 700 o'clock each
evening.
X. Rodgers Sylvester News Editot
Tom C. Reid........Telejraph Editor
Verne 'Burnett.......Teleraph 'Editotr
E. P. Wright. .........Sports Editor
SC.' B. Parker.....Assignment Editor
onrad N. Church........ City Editor
Edwin A. Hyman.............City Editor
Lee Joslyn...........Cit Editor
Gordon D. Cooke........Statistical Editor
Edward Z. Mack......Advertising Manager
H. Kirk White........Publication Manager
Y. R. Althseler.......Circulation Managr
C. V. Sellers..........Accounat
C. T. lrishleigh. .Asistant Business Mlaager
Night Editors
Leonard W. Nieter Earl Pardee
L. S. ThompsonHelyil J. L. Stadeker
Henley Hil
Reporters
H. A. Fitzgerald H. C. L. Jackson
Golda Ginsburg Jas Schermerhorn, Jr.
Linton B. Dimond E. A. Baumgart
Bruce Swaney E. L. Ziegler
W. R. Atlas Frank Taber
Nat Thompson Holland Thompson
Phil Pack H. C. Garriso
Allen Shoenfield D. S. Rood
C. W. Neumann
Business Staff
Albert E. Horne Roscoe Rau
E. C. Msgrave F. M. Sutter
K. S. MccJll L. W. Kennedy
J. E. Campbell
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19, 1916.
Night Editor-L. S. Thompson
BRING ON THE MILK BOTTLES
The State expends time and money
upon educating men at its institu-
tions. Later it spends more time and
more money in the maintenance of
some. of these men as professors 'and
masters of research. The increased
knowledge that these men bring to the
world is the compensation that the
State receives.
Fourteen members of the University
faculty, having tired of the adminis-
tration's apparent spinelessness, have
sought to strengthen the Allies in
their part in the Great War. These
men have been trained to study prob-
lems from all angles before reaching
their decisions. They are used to
weighing carefully all the evidence.
Several of them, by reason of their
peculiar training, are eminently fit-
ted to judge and lead public opinion
in regard to the right and wrong of
this great struggle. These men have
been trained by the State for that pur-
pose. And yet when they seek to ex-
press these well considered opinions
they are promptly muzzled by an ul-
tra-conservative press and threatened
with a "scolding" by the university
administration.
To quote from the Washington
Times: "Perhaps neutrality can rea-
sonably be carried that far. Perhaps
because a man is a professor he
should be barred from expressing
opinions; though there has been lit-

tle objection to the intellectual ac-
tivities of scholars who have ranged
themselves on the other side. But
as a whole it seems that the men best
qualified to pass deliberate, informed,
understanding opinions on such sub-
jects ought to be encouraged to for-
mulate and to express views."
Those who object to this frank
stand on the part of the faculty mem-
bers contend that they signed in their
official and not their individual ca-
pacities. _If. this -were "true ,the con-
troversy would assume a different
complexion. But these men signed
first their names, then their addresses
and lastly, down in one corner, their
occupations. The effect and signi-
ficance of signatures of this kind have
often been passed upon by the courts,
yet if these courts were called upon
to say that the signatures as they ap-
peared on the petition would have
bound the university and not the in-
dividuals had the instrument been a
note, we can imagine what their an-
swer would have been.
DAILY INTERVIEWS
ANDB:COMMENTS
Many students who joined the Na-
tional Security league have received
requests from headquarters to wire
or write their approval of section 56
of the Chamberlain bill which pro-
vides for a citizen soldiery trained to
arms and under absolute and direct
federal control Those who take to
heart the political lesso which our
country has been fortunate enough to
receive as the result of the Great War
will readily sympathize with such a
proposal. We have seen, on the one
hand, that the American people as a
whole have been but dimly conscious
of what are historic American ideals,
and on the other hand, there can be no
question of the growing strength of a
national movement. Three or four
years ago a program of preparedness
would have met little public approval,
both because of the feeling that mili-
tary service meant merely a waste of
time, and that no national duty toward
defense of his country was incumbent
upon the citizen of the United States.
Europeans might be burdened with
military service .but Americans were
free! The--scorn in which this view
is now held reveals the tremendous
change which has come about. H..G
Wells says the United States has lived
more politically in the last two years
than it had previously for a hundred
It is the task of contemporary states4
men to give efficient direction to this
growing spirit, and the provision
above, for its kind, is suitable. Mil-
tary service should be made volun-
tary, but it should also be made popu-
lar by providing the best facilities
and officers obtainable.-E. R. S.
ROBIECT TOFROIC' DTE
SAYS CONNITTEE DISPLAYS IG-
NORANCE IN SELECTING GOOD
FRIDAY FOR FRESHMAN EVENT.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The freshman class is supposed to
be green, but nevertheless it seems
as though it ought to know the pur-
pose and character of Good *Friday.
The committee in charge of the "Frosh
Frolic" have displayed great ignor-
ance by setting April 21 as the date
for the affair. If it be truly ignorance,

WAHR'S
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORIES

Made New

U
U

Uw

PIANOS

A. B. Chase, Merrill, Becker Brothers, and
Norris & Hyde
A Fine Line at the Right Price
See Them Before Purchasing

Panxos for-Rout

i

ton evr Ma a !lflusic Ibouse
MRS. M. M. ROOT
Corner Maynard and William.Streets

NNW

-.. - -. b,,

Racket Restringing a Specially
100 New Rackets Just Received at

EASTER

I YOUR TENNIS R

GO TO
TUTT LE'S

I

n Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869
............$ 300,000.00
. .$ 150,000.00
es over .... $3,000,000.00
king in all branches
Vice, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Office, 707 North Univ.
ersity Avenue.
E IN AND TRY OUR
Combination Lunch
25c 5:3 P. .
to 7P. M.

CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEMOR'S SUEY
WAX KING LOO
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
FIRST NATLI BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH,
Capital $Ioo,ooo Surplus and Profit $$65,ooo
DIRECTORS:
W IR t CORN W ELL WALDO M. ABBOTT
Gxo. W. PATTERSON HARRY M. HAWLEY
S. W. CLARKSO.N HARRISON SOULE
FRED SCHMID D. B. StTTON
E. D KINNIE
POR
CHOICE CUT LOWERS
TO BIS CHOFF'SHOUS
220 Chapin St. Phone Sog-.M

CHOCOLATES
GILBERT'S and CRANE'S
We will pack any size pack-
age ready for shipment and
deliver to any point in U.S.A.
Place yo u r order early
enough to insure delivery.
quarry tCompany's
Prescription Drug Store'

For the BEST in

SODAS
CANDIES
LUNCH ES

I

On State

,
0

PARTICULAR LAUNDRY

For
Particular
People

CITY LAUNDRY
THOS. ROWE, Prop.

Detroit Street

Phone 457-M

e

iigan Inn
)p Suey

Wurster Bros.

St.

Opp. the ArcadiaI

Pasturized Milk
and Cream

ers & Mechanics Bank

. '
..... v
,
.:
,...
.,
"'". " ..
". ..
* '-.tg
4
f N,
y'".
a,
.,.
"J;, r
3
,y , t,<

Just Arrived
Medium weight Black and
Brown Shoes for early
Spring wear
Prices from $4.00 to $7T
Complete showing of
Oxfords for Spring
and Summer

Phone 423

Street

State Street Office
330 S. State St'.

STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
MULTIGRIAPHING
milton Business College
State and Williams'

Cor. Detroit and Catherine

t J

AHR'SSHOE STORES

IN

I

Enoch Dieterle
Funeral Director
210 South 4th Ave.
Phone 404

MAIN STREET

STATE STREET

i 1

_mI

ow

outh End Meat Market and Grocery1

on the part of the committee, I think
that it would please -many if the date

. r

Meats of Quality
and Variety

Poultry, Fish
and Game
in Season,

T I -3fei'
New l~i'f

Ready-for -Wear

We have a mighty attractive
line of hand-tailored clothes, cut
in semi-conservative style of the

Clothes for Young Men

of the "Frolic" were changed. It is
rather queer that such a day should be
chosen for the dance out of the 366.
Why not hold it on Sunday? Let those
who wish to celebrate the anniver-
sary in such a manner go to Detroit
and spend the evening with others of
their -class.
I am not a minister's son, nor do
I ever intend to be a minister of the
Gospel. If this were so I would have
found out six months ago that I was
at the wrong institution. No, far be
it from such, but I do believe in show-
ing that much respect toward the ob-
servance of the day. Would it listen
well to the public if the biggest social
event of the freshmen at the Univer-
sity of Michigan were held on Good
Friday.? Surely no harm would be
done to the reputation of the univer-
sity and the freshmen if the date were
changed. As "Doc" May would say,
"Think it over."
Nevertheless, wishing the freshman
class entire success in this and all
other events, I am,
A FROSH.
Motor Cop Enforces Speed Ordinance
Since the arrival of the new motor-
bike for Motor Officer E. J. Sodt, of
the local police force, the speeding or-
dinance in regard to automobiles has
been rigidly enforced. During the
past two weeks, nearly 20 cases have
been brought before local justices and
the campaign of extermination against
speed demands is certain to continue.
Fifteen miles in the resident district,
and 10 miles in the business district

best of

material, every suit

de-

A. Lemble

signed for a young man.
WAGNER & COMPANY
" Clothe Young Men Complete."
STATE STREET
ESTABLISHED 1848

0 Brown Street

Phones 235 and 399

Lyndon for good pictures.
le ponies at 50c per hour. Call

WE WANT GREEN SALESMEN
Our method of training gives you a
thorough knowledge of salesmanship.
Investigate the "Wear-Ever" proposi-
tion. Call Herman Schmidt, 450-J.
All kinds baseballs, Indoor-Balls &
Tennisballs at Cushings.

open under new manage-

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