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April 19, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-19

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TFE DAILY
76e
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
JTLEGRAPH SERVICE BY I
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CEi

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VOL. XXVI. No. 135.

ANN ARBOR, MICIIIGAN, WEDNESIDAY, A PRIL 19, 1916.

COACH PROMISES
INFIELD SHAKE-UP
FOR DLIVET GAME
LINE-UP OF MICHIGAN INNER
DEFENSE UNCERTAIN AT
PRESENT
LABADIE BIG STAR OF TRIP
"Jo" Robins or Miller Probable Hurl-
ers for Opening Game on Ferry
Field Tomorrow
"There will be a big shake-up on the
Michigan infield for Thursday's game
against Olivet," Coach Lundgren prom-
ised last night.
The line-up on the inner defense of-'
fers several possibilities and no cer-
tainties. Newell may continue at first
but there is a strong possibility that
Wehmeyer will replace him. Bialosky
is apparently billed for second, al-
though the coach has not definitely de-
termined who will cover the keystone
sack. Walterhouse hasn't cinched his
berth at short by any means, accord-
ing to Lundgren, and there may be a
substitution there. Third base is an
open question, with Anderson and Cas-
well figuring as the two favored can-
didates.
Outfield Will Remain Intact
The outfield will stand intact. "Bil-
(Continued on Page Six)
i6

Arrest Von Pape'"'
Right Hand IMan
Wolf 1on Ejiel, Whlont ion llerastorff
9Souglt to Protect, Is Tlakers In
Wellatnd Canaul Case
New York, April 18.-Wolf von Eitel,
Captain F ra- von rapen's rimht lau;
man. whouz Count von Ber-it'nff(
rcight in vain to have listed as a mem-
ber .,f his o'icial family immune from
arrest, was taken today on a war-
rant cht i. it g hin- nith having en-
'ag d in a military enterprise to blow
up the Welland canal. His name w
fifth in the indictment again von
Papen.i ecalled military attach f
the German embas y, and other:; im-
plicated in the plot tc destroy the
Canadlan waterway.
FROSH FROLIC TO BE BIG VENT'
Preparations for Yearlings' Dance Au-
gur Success; Decorations Elaborate
Final arrangements have been com-
pleted for the 3"Frosh Frolic" to be
held Friday evening at the Armory
and the event promises to be one of
the most attractive of the early spring
season.
The decorations are to carry out the
idea of Spring, green and white being
the dominating colors. Brown leather
programs will be used. Shook's or-
chestra has been engaged and refreshp
ments will be served throughout the
evening. Dancing will begin at 8:00
o'clock and continue until 1:00. The.
number of tickets remaining is limit-
ed. These may be obtained at the
Union desk.

r
i
r

INFANTRY ATTAgCK
1738 PHISONERS
TEUTONS BRING TOTAL FRENCI
(CAPTIVES UP TO
40,604
REPORT GERMANS REPULSED

Separate Peace Is
CauseOfProrogue
iutt:on in liussian 1)um Brings Im-
pet al 'Tkase; Feeling Is
Among' Officials Only

VILLA'S DEATH STILL UNCONFIRMED;
EL PASO BUSINESS MAN RECEIVES
j WORD; CARRAN-ZA WARNS PERSHI1

BEGIN

EXCAVATION
FOR GYM EXTENSION.-

Wilson Delays Note to Germany
Order to Get Expression
of Opinion

In

SITUATION SAID TO BE TENSE
Washington, April 18.-President'
Wilson will go before Congress on the
German submarine -issue tomorrow.
The note which the president intend-
ed to send to Germany will be held up
in the meantime. The president's ac-
tion clearly indicates the serious na-
ture of the note which is said to be
virtually an ultimatum. The news
that the President would address Con-
gress came unexpectedly and with
dramatic suddenness tonight.
It had been announced that the
president would confer with congres-
sional leaders before putting the note
on the table. But after the cabinet
meeting today, it was decided that the
far-reaching consequences of the pos-
sible refusal by Germany to accede to
the president's demands fully justified
his addressing congress on the sub-
ject.
So far as is known the president
will ask no action on the part of con-
gress tomorrow. His executive pre-
rogative does not demand that he ob-
tain congressional sanction for a sev-
erance of diplomatic relations with
Germany or action which may lead to
this.
What the president realizes is that
severance of diplomatic relations may
even lead to the necessity for more
drastic action and he consequently
feels that the legislative branch of the
government should be consulted. The
president has practically pledged him-
self to consult congress before taking
any definite drastic action on the Ger-
man situation.
Having informed Congress of his in-
tention and after obtaining the tacit
consent of congress to go ahead, the
president will then address his final
warning to Germany on the submarine
issue. Count von Bernstorff, the
German ambassador, conferred with
Secretary Lansing at the State de-
partment today, but said he had no
news from his government which ex-
plained the situation.

Excavation for the foundation of the
east half of the extension to Water-
man gymnasium has been begun by
the contractor, A. R. Cole, of Ann Ar-
bor. The iron fence, which formerly
bordered the walk west of the building,
has been taken away, and thetrees
in the lawn are being cut down prep-
aratory to excavation on that side.
Class Track Practice to Continue
Despite the fact that Intramural
Coach "Rosy" Rowe will be out of the
city for the remainder of this week
class track training will go on just the
same and from now on Ferry Field will
fairly bluster with sweltering athletes
in every line of sport.
Before leaving yesterday "Rosy"
stated that beginning this afternoon
"Bones" Armstrong would be on hand
from 3:30 to 5:30 each day to take
charge of class track athletics.
House Doubles West Point Cadet Corps
Washington, April 18.-The senate
entered today upon the closing hours
of the army reorganization bill, which
probably will be passed tomorrow. A
bill was passed today doubling the
size of the cadet corps at West Point
military academy.
GOLFERS TO MEET TONIGHT
Membership in Association Limited to
35; No Reduction in Fee
University golf enthusiasts will meet
at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the Union,
to formulate plans for the coming
year.
The Ann Arbor Golf association has
limited the University club to 35 mem-
members, and over 75 applications
have already been received for mem-
bership in the club.
Announcement has been made that
there will be no reduction in the $8.00
fee, and the Ann Arbor Association
intends to maintain a strict policing
of the grounds. Persons, playing on
the course yesterday were charged
$1.00 for the afternoon.

French War Office Claims That Enemy
Penetrated Only a First
Line Trench
London, April 18.-The German in-
fantry attack east of the .Meuse,
launched yesterday by 30,000 picked
infantry troops, netted the Crown
Prince part of a salient east of Chauf-
f,.Lr wood west of Douaumont village,
and 1738 French prisoners, including
42 officers. Of this total only 50 men
were wounded. This niumber brings
the total of French, captured since the
Ver'lun fighting began, to 40,604, of'
whom 753 are officers..
As an answer to semi-official French
statemeits charging the Germans with
gross exaggeration of the French loss-
es in prisoners, the Berlin war office
announced today that the name of each
officer and man captured in the Ver-
dun fighting will be published in the
Gazette Defardenne, as have been the
Iams of all prisoners taken since the
outbreak, of the war.
It is frankly admitted here that yes-
(Continued on Page Six)
PRHIB[ITIONUCMPAIGN
IS AIMED AT MICHIGAN
School and College Fight to Begin
Here; Dry University Town Is
to Be Big Issue.
"The University of . Michigan is
going dry," declare leaders of the
Michigan Dry Campaign committee,
who are organizing college students
in every institution of the state for
the fight against the saloon. The uni-
versity and college campaign will be-
gin at the University of Michigan and
Ypsilanti Normal school Thursday and;
Friday of this week with the annual
state convention of the Inter-Collegi-
ate Prohibition association.
That the University of Michigan it-
self should be wholly rid of saloon,
influence is the contention of Harry
G. McCain, who is in charge of the
intercollegiate movement. During]
April Mr. McCain's travels in all
parts of the state have convinced himJ
that thousands of alumni, and other
thousands whoare parents of students
at the University of Michigan, will do
everything in their power to abolish
saloons in the state because thereby
Ann Arbor will be made a dry town.
"Nine-tenths of the students and
faculty at the State University are on
the dry side today," said Mr. McCain.f
"This statement may surprise you butI
it is a fact. Opinion -and practice at]
Ann Arbor as to drinking have beenI
steadily changing for the better in thel
last three years. I believe the State
University alone will furnish us five1
hundred workers for the cmapaign
and we may have three hundred at]
Ypsilanti.
"Every educational institution in
Michigan is being organized for the]
campaign of education showing theE
evils of liquor as a beverage. An army
of five thousand students from the va-
rious colleges will be busy during
the summer vacation distributing lit-]
erature, canvassing communities, and
making speeches. Debates will be a
feature of the campaign. I am now
enrolling workers."
At the state convention it is ex-E
pected addresses will be made by ex-]
(Continued on Page Six)

Paris. April 18.---One of the reasons
which led to the pro-rogation yester-
day of the Russian Duma, by a special
imperial u'ase, was the increasing'
agitation on the pai t of some mem-
bers of the Russi:in parliament for a
separate peace the central
pow ers.
Anthentic information to this effect
was obtained in official quarters here
today, though no details are made
public. curing the epssion toward the
end of March, erelations were made
in the Duma, it was learned today,
concer'ning a nem orandum headed
"high ofsicml quarters," by a commit-
tee of leading Russian statesmen, in-
cluding the ministers of justice, in-
terior and cdu, ation, all of whom sign-
ed th memorandum.
The longing for peace, reports from
Petrograd state, prevail only among
the bureaucracy, while it is asserted
that the masses of the people are en-
thutiastic for a continuation of tlhe
war.
PERMIT STUDENTS TO.
FORM.AERPLNECORPS
Michigau State Naval Board Sends
Consent; 8th and 9th Divisions
of Reserve Meet Tonight

Permission has been granted by the
Michigan state naval board for the
formation of an aeronautic force of
3 men and five officers, and an en-
gineer division of 48 men and five offi-
cers in the ranks of the undergradu-
ates. Plans for these divisions will
be discussed at the meeting of the
eighth and ninth divisions of the Mich-
igan-naval reserve to be held this eve-
ning in Waterman gymnasium at 7:30
o'clock.
At 8:00 .o'clock, the. recently organ-
ized officers' drill corps, under the
direct-ion of C. E. Wilson of the engi-
neering faculty, will meet in room 348
of the New Engineering building for
a short meeting, at which Colonel A.
C. Peck will speak.
Following this meeting, the men will
adjourn to Waterman gymnasium for
a short preliminary drill. The an-
nouncement of this was given at an
assembly held shortly before the East-
er vacation, at which the men interest-
00 voted to assume a temporary uni-
form consisting of blue flannel shirts,
white duck trousers, and white duck
hats.
INLANDER HAS 0OOD FICTION
littial Number Also Contains Good
Poetry; Esther Shaw Contributes
Two stories and five poems, all of
which are said to possess exceptional
merit, will be among the most promin-
ent contributions to the first issue of
the re-established Inlander, which will
be on sale the latter part of the week.
One of the stories has been written by
Esther E. Shaw, grad., and the other,
a humorous offering, was contributed
by Allen Shoenfield, '18.
In addition to these stories and
poems there are the four major ar-
ticles already announced, three of
which were written by members of the
faculty of the literary college, and the
editorial pages of the publication.
Steel Trust Increases Wages
New York, April 18.-The United
States Steel Corporation today an-
nounced another advance in wagesr
amounting to 10 per cent, effective May
1. This followed a 10 per cent ad-
vance made in February. Both togeth-
er rel3resent a total increase in wage
payments of between $20.000,000 and
$30,000,000.

BROCKMAN UNABLE TO
Illness Forces Noted Religious Work-
er to Cancel Engagement Here;
May Get John .. Mott
Fletcher Brockman, of New York
City, has wired that because of ill-
ness he will be unable to speak at
the mass meeting in lill auditorium,
Sunday night, to start off the annual
Busrah campaign. It is possible that
John R. Mott or some other great re-
ligiousworker, may be secured as a
substitute:
Two or three of the captains of the
various squads of workers in the ap-
proaching campaign for funds for the
Michigan mission in Arabia, have re-
(Continued on Page .Six)
Dr. Drury to Go to Camp Bogardus
Dr. Charles P. Drury has been ap-
pointed as physician in charge to ac-
company the students who make up
the engineering and camp and bio-
logical station at Camp Bogardus,
near Topmnabeex for the coming sum-
mer.
In previous years Camp Bogardus
was under the medical supervision of
Dr. C. B. Stouffer. This summer Drs.
H. H. Cummings and Stouffer will re-
main in charge of the local health
service.
IWHAT'S GOIN(GON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Moderate showers with variable
winds.
TODAY
4:00 o'clock--Senior Lit Reception
Committee meets, room 203 Tappan
Hall.
4:00 o'clock-W. P. Blair speaks on
"Brick as Paving Material," 348 Eng.
4:00 o'clock-Ed S. Rogers speaks
on the law of trademarks and unfair
trade, room C, Law building.
7:04) o'clock-Annual banquet of the
Adelphi House of Representatives, Cut-
ting Cafe.
7:00 o'clock-Rehearsal of U. of M..
band, University hall.
_.7:15 o'clock-All-Fresh Glee club
meets, McMillan hall.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of Naval Re-
serve, Waterman gym.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of U. of M.
Golf association, Union.
TOMORROW
8:00 o'clock A. M.-Senior engineer
assembly, room 348, Eng.
10:00 o'clock A. M.-Sophomore en-
gineer assembly, room 348, Eng.
11:00 o'clock A. 'T.--Junior engi-
neer assembly, room 348, Eng.
3:15 o'clock--Freshmen meet in front
of U-hall to march to game.
4:05 o'clock-Olivet vs. Michigan
baseball game, Ferry Field.
U-NOTICES
The retiring Executive Board will
entertain the Michigan Dames at a
thimble party at the home of Mrs.
Stacy Guild and Mrs. Wayne Atwell,
1115 Lincoln, today from 3:00 to 5:30
o'clock. All members are especially
urged to be present.
Soph engineer baseball practice will
be held on South Ferry Field this aft-
ernoon at 2:30 o'clock. All men ex-
pecting to try out for the. team are
urged to report.
There- will be a J-engineer baseball
practice at 4:00 o'clock on South Ferry

Field this afternoon. I

VILLA'S DEATH UNCONFIRMED-
MEXICAN CONSUL CLAIMS HE HA
PAPERS TELLING BODY
WAS EXHUMED ,
FUNSTON AWAITING ORDER
Mexican Situation Described as Threal
enuing by General; Secretary of
War and Wilson Confer
El Paso, April 18.--Definite wor
was received in El Paso today by ai
El Paso business man, with interest
in Cusi Huiriachic, Chihuahua, tha
there was nothing in the way of wor
to confirm the report that Villa ha<
died or that his body had been 10
cated by officers of the Carranza
forces.
The information is the first to read
the border with the exception of wire
received by the constitutionalist au-
Sthorities. - Though the wording j
guarded it obviously is intended to dis.
credit the report that the body of Villa
has been found. Mexican Consul Gar-
cia, however, asserted tonight that he
had additional despatches 'from San
Antonio, Chihuahua, late this evening
that 'makes him stronger than ever it
the belief that the body of Villa has
been exhumed and idenitified. He sai
he received the information from the
telegraph operator at San Antonio
who sent him the first news Sunday 01
the reported discovery of the body
Consul Garcia gave out a report from
Governor Enriquez, at Chihuahus
City:
"News of the capture of Villa has
not yet been confirmed. Many reports
have been received that he is dead and
the reports are considered worthy of
belief. Carranza chiefs are occupied
in tracking down Villa and bringing
him in dead or alive."
CARRA N ZA TI RE ATENS TROUBI
Washington, April 18.--Carranzista
military authorities in southern Chi-
huahua have served notice on Gener-
al Pershing, commander of the Ame-
can forces in Mexico, that any attempi
on the part of the American expedi-
tion to proceed further south will lead
to serious trouble.
Major-General Funston, forwarding
the Pershing report, is understood tc
have described as threatening the at-
titude of the Carranzistas and to have
asked for further instructions. He is
said to have sent additional troops
across the border to guard the line
of communication. There was no con-
firmation of press reports from the
border of fresh attacks by Carranzis-
tas on Pershing's forces.
Secretary of War Baker, following
the receipt of the Funstaon despatch
carried it personally to the office o
Secretary of State Lansing. The twc
conferred some time concerning it, aft-
er which the secretary of war got intc
communication with the White House
and made an appointment to confer
with the President.
Mr. Baker was with the President
for about an hour, but declined tc
comment upon the visit. Before see-
ing the President, Secretary Baker
said, "We have given no orders tc
General Funston that change in any
way the character of the expedition or
its movements."
Favor Partial Withdrawal of Troops
Despite this announcement there i
growing anxiety in official circles
High officials continue skeptical con-
cerning the report of Villa's death
and members of the President's cab-
inet are said to be urging that ar-
rangements be made to withdraw the
expedition partly in view of the Ger-
man situation.
The argument is finding favor in

(Continued on Page Six)

FRIDAY
APRIL

FROSH

FROLIC

AT

THE

W

H

SHOOK'S J-HOP ORCHESTRA

21st

ARMORY

DANCING 8 to

Tickets now on sale to everyone at the Union Price, $2.00

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