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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 05, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

......-

RESPONSIBILITY IS ATTACHED

to a mere promise of making a good suit
of clothes, but it takes considerable re-
sp nsibility and competency to dulfill that
promise. We are real tailors and do it.

G"
DING

H. WILD COMPANY
MERCHANT TAILORS STATE ST:

Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Francis F. McKinney......Managing Editor
John S. Leonard.........Business Manager
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. S.b-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $2.50. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students' Supply
Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State
Phones: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed soo words in
length, or notices of events will be published
in The Daily if left at the office in the Ann
Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the
west corridor of the general library, where
the notices are collected at 7:00 o'clock each
evening.

DAILY INTERVIEWS
AND COMMENTS

"HOW MUCH LIT WORK?"

L

....

Fraternaties

promm

-u 1 'il

t the habit

and buy your
oor Balls and Bats

4. Rodgers Sylvester News
Ton C. Reid.. .......Telegraph
Verne Burnett............Telegraph
M. P. Wright.............. ..Sports

Editor
Editor
Efditor
Editoi

AT

HE EHANS
STUDENTS BOOKSTORE
NE

ETROIT UNITED LINES
n Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
un on Eastern time, one hour faster
1l time.
t Limited and Express Cars-8:jo a.
ourly to 7:1o p. M., 9:10 p. M.
azoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
o hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
m.
ars, Eastbound- 535 a. ., 6:40 a. m.,
n., and every two hours to 7 :05 P. in.,
1., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. ml. To Ypsi-
r, 8:48 a. m. (daily except Sunday),
n., i2:05 p . p. .,6:05 p. in., i:45 p.
a. mn., 1:2o a. nm.
Cars, Westbound-6:12 a. n., 7:5o a.
every two hours to 7:50 p. n., 10 :20
:2o a. mn.
Ann Arbor Savings Bank,
Organized 1869
al ............$ 300,000.00
ilus ...........$ 150,000.00
urces over .... $3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
nOffice, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
nch Office, 707 North Univ-
ersity Avenue.

TRY
CHAPMA'S JEWELRY 'STORE
For Akarm Clocks and Michigan Pins
113 SO. MAIN STREET
Our "Tailor-Made" Clothes Cost No More
Than the Average "Ready-Made"
CANSLE, The Tailor
108 E. Washington St Second Floor
CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
(ERGE'S S ~
WAI KING LOO
314 S. State St. Phene 1244-M
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $rodooo Surplus and Profit $$65,ooo
DIRECTORS:
WIRT CORNWELL WALDO M. ABBOTT
GEO. W. PATTERSON HARRY M. HAWLEY
S. W. CLARKSON HARRISON SOULE
FRED SCHMID D. B. SUTTOX
E. D KINNIE
' FOR
CHOICE CVT FLOWERS
o BISCHOFF'S ROUSE
220 Chapin St. Phone 8og-M

'.C. B. Parker .......ssignmnent Editor
od -A.Church-.-..........-.-City Editor
EdwiA.Hymnan............... City Editor
Lee Joslyn....... ....City Editor
Gordon ID. Cooke ........tatisticalI Editof
Edward E. Mack........Advertising Manager
H. Kirk Whie.........Publication Manager
Y. k. Althseler... Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers........ . .Accountant
C. T. Fishleigh .. Assistant Business Manage
Night Editors
Leonard W. Nieter Earl Pardee
L. S. Thompson J. L. Stadeker
Hienley hill
Reporters
H. A. Fitzgerald Ii. C. L. Jackson
Golda Ginsburg Jas Scherinerhorn, Jr.
Lintoix B. Dimond E. A. Baumgarth
Bruce Swaney E. L. Ziegler
W. R. Atlas Frank Taber
Nat 'rhoirnson Rolland Thompson
Phil Pack I. C. Garrison
Allen' Shoenfield 1). S. Rood
(. W. Neumann
Business Staff
Albert E;. Homne Roscoe Rau
E. C. Musgrave F. i. Sutter
K. S. McColl L. W. Kennedy
J. E. Campbell
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1916.
Night Editor ...... Leonard W. Nieter

The question of "How much lit
work" is not only of great importance
to ourselves during our university
years, but has occupied the minds of
the greatest statesmen as being of vit-
al significance to the strength of the
nation. Aristotle believed it a question
of paramount importance, since "edu-
cation is the great instrument by which
the legislator can insure that future
citizens of his state will share those
common beliefs which make the state
possible. "le had in mind, of course,
a democracy on a very small scale
as compared with our own, and he
was not affected by the contemporary
problems of "specialization."
In 1539 Disraeli argued for "nation-
al" education, which left it in pri-
vate hands, but opposed "state" edu-
cation because of what he believed to
be its narrowing tendency. "By a
ystem of state education," he said, "all
would be thrown into the same mint
and all would come out with the same
impress and superscription." The
product of such an educational system
"might make money, might make rail-
roads, but when the age of passion
came, when those interests were in
motion, and those feelings stirring,
which would shake society to its cen-
tre," such training would not produce
men of the calibre of the crisis. "If
persisted in,' the supporters of state
education "would find that they had
revolutionized the English character;
and when that was effected, then they
could no longer expect English
achievements.
Our own University of Michigan
has proved more than any other in-
stitution that state education can
equip men to assume the most respon-
sible offices in the state, but it is
well to remember that the Michigan
alumni who now grace the legislative
halls. at Washington are of an earlier
generation of students, whose training
was not so deeply affected by a spe-
cialized ideal. Undoubtedly the ten-
dency of the past few years toward
more lit work for students in the spe-
etalized departments appreciates the
fact that "men of the crisis are need-
ed in every nation.

A.; B. Chase,.Merrill, Becker Brothers, and
Norris & flyde
A Fine Line at the Right Price
See Them Before Purchasing
Pian~os for Remy
USI
MRS. M. M. ROOT
Corner Maynard and Wiliam Streets

ENGINEE
Have You'Seen It? A Very Great
Time Saver.
The Rust Lettering Scale
Price $1.25
WAn-"
VNIVERSITY BOOK STORES

IMARCH WINDS.I

I

and

CHAPS

GO TO
TU TTLE'S
For the BEST in
SODAS
CANDIES
L UN C H ES
Oil State
PAR TICUL A R I UN CRY

Have no Terrors when
DERMAL CREAM
is used

GRASS OR NO GRASS?

IN AND TRY OUR

e Combination Lunch
i 2:30P. M.

Ian Inn
Suey
Opp. the Arcadia

Wurster Bros.
Pasturized Milk
and Cream

11

Ui

rty Si.'

rmners & Mechanics Bank,

ii

Phone 423

State Street Office{
330 S. State -St.

J

For years one of the stock subjects
for editorial comment by The Daily
has concerned keeping off the grass.
For years there have been space and
energy wasted.
Unfortunately the artist who land-
scape-designed the campus had for-
gotten that a straight line is the
shortest distance between two points,
and that hurrying men and women,
with five minutes to make a class and
two hundred yards to travel, are prone
to forsake the artistic curves of the
cement sidewalk for the more efficient'
paths of necessity. In many places
these paths of necessity are well de-
fined and universally used. These, al-
though uncemented, are an essential
part of the campus system of walks,.
and our quarrel is not with the man
or woman who uses them.
What we object to is the widening
out of these paths to undue propor-
tions, and the growing habit of start-
ing paths where none exist. The ideal
plan would be to have all the walks
paved. Then there would be no ques-
tion as to what was a trespass and
what was not.
But as things exist the only reme-
dy we can see is in a constituted po-
lice force, preferably of seniors, which
will use its influence to give the grass
a chance.
Advertizers in The Michigan Daily
are the reliable business men of the
city. It is to your interest to trade
with them. **
Patronize Michigan Daily Advertiz-
ers. **

In his memoirs just published,
Charles Francis Adams, who is di-
rectly descended from John Quin-
cy Adams, and himself famous as
publicist and author, makes a strong
protest against the "Harvard system,
the old, outgrown, pedagogic relation
of the large class-recitation room."
"The only variation," he says, "has
been through Eliot's effort to replace it
by the yet more pernicious system of
premature specialization. This is a
confusion of the college and university
functions, and constitutes a distinct;
menace to all true higher education.
The function of the college is an all-
around development as a basis for uni-
versity specializations. Eliot never
grasped that fundamental fact, and so
he undertook to turn Harvard College
into a German university-specializing
the student at 18. He thus made still
worse what was in . my time bad
enough. He instituted a system of
one-sided contact in place of a system
based on no contact at all. It is d.e-
voutly to be hoped that some day a
glimmer of true light will effect an
entrance into the professional educa-
tor's head. It certainly had not done
so up to 1906."-E. R. S.
Look over the advertizements in
The Michigan Daily. They will in-
terest you.u*

.

Made only at

QUARRY DRUG
GOMPANY'S
Prescription Store

,,,
...
.' .
; . ,,
. ..
a " i .
"
.r . .
s'
" ., '
z,

lust Arrived'
Medium weight Black and
Brown Shoes for early
- Spring wear
Prices from $4.00I to $7.
Complete showing of
Oxfords for Spring
and Summer

CITY LAUNDRY
THOS. ROWE, Prop.

For
Particular
People

Detroit Street

Phone 457-NI

m 4

Cor. Detroit and Catherine

I STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED,
TYPEWRITERS
FOR SALE OR RENT
Typewriting Supplies
milton Business College
State and Wllinams Sts.

E

Enoch Dieterle
Funeral Director
210 South 4th Ave.'
Phone 404

W AH R'S SHOE STORES

MAIN STREUT

STATE STREET

p

South End Meat Market and Grocery

GIVE B'BITHDAY' ALNE
IWOXEN PLAN INFORMAL PARTY

AFTER BASKETBALL

GAME

] ON THURSDAY

Patronize Daily Advertizers.

Meats of Quality
and V a riety

i

Poultry, Fish
and Game
in Season

+

LENGTH
OF TIME

WORN
THE SAME

4

Following the championship basket-
ball game of the women's series,
Thursday evening, at Barbour gym-
nasium, there will beheld an inform-
al "birthday" dance. The game is
called for 7:30 o'clock, and is be-
tween the senior and sophomore
teams, who have -won their games in
the preliminaries. All university
women are urged to turn out to sup-
port their teams with cheers and
songs.
STRAND
BY
N° 505 SLK. N? 605 TAN
Wagner & Co.
State Street

Immrediately after the game, the
the men will he admitted to the
gymnasium by ticket only. Girls
will secure these ticIets at the gym-
nasium some time before Thursday,
and give them to their escorts. There
will be no admission fee.
One of the features of the dance
will be the collection of the birthday
ioney, each guest being e(pected to
contribute as many cents as he or she
is years old.
All bills hici:rred by mleibers of ammy
sub-committee of the Women's Lun-
cheon committee, merit be in ,the
hands of the chairman, Ruth Hutzel,
'16, or the treasurer, Alice Craft, '18,
by Thursday noon, or the committee
will not be responsible for them.
Scores of "The Y'ankee Yogi" are on
sale in University hail.
The fairy dance, of tHe Shakespear-
ean Pageant, will hold an important
rehearsal on Thursday afternoon, at
4:00 o'clock.
Glee Club vill meet this afternoon
at 5:00 o'clock.
The consolation gamie be(een the
senior and sophomore basketbail
teams will be played this evening a
7:30 o'clock.
Suffrage Club to Meet Tomorrow
A meeting of the Suffrage club of
the university will be held tomorrow
afternoon at 4:15 o'clock at Newberry
residence. Mrs. Langford, who has
been in touch with the recent suffrage
meetings held in Detroit, will outline
the work now being carried on in that
city. Mrs. Glaser will give a short
talk on special phases of the suffrage

A. Lemble

Which shoe do you think would
give you the most satisfaction and
be the most economical?

Brown Sreet

Phones 235 and 399

q

Dr. W. S. MILLS
Osteopathic Physician
14-618 First National Bank Bldg.
Ann Arbor Mich.'
321-M

Special sale of hand carved frames.
Your photograph in one will make an
ideal gift. De Fries Art Store. Down
town. apr3,4,5
Taxi 2255, open under new manage-
ment.

SHOES
OF COURSE !

Sole'Agentia

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