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April 05, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-05

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I

r

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

CHIGAN U

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY ]T
NEW YORK SUN

_._._. .,

:,- _

VOL. XXVI. No. 131.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENT

_

___ _--

y

VOTERS FAVOR ALL
ORFPROPOSITIONS IN
MONDAY ELECTION
ELECT ELEVEN COMMISSIONERS
TO REWRITE ANN ARBOR
CHLARTER
VOTE$25000 FOR NEW BRIDGE
Fourth Ward Witnesses Hot Fight
in Election; Landslide for
Democrats
Complete returns from the city elec-
tion of Monday, April 3, show a ma-
jority of 152 for the proposition to
rewrite the charter of Ann Arbor.
The eleven members to compose . the
commission to form the new charter
are: D. D. Springer, B. Frank Sa-
very, Fred E. Heusel, Jr., C. John
Waltz, Ottmar Eberbach, Ernest Schae-
berle, Herman E. Graf, George H.
Rinsey, Fremont P. Ward, Julius Tro-
janowski, and George J. Burke.
In addition to favoring a revision
of the %charter, the city voters also
gave thenecessary three-fifths vote
to the $25,000 appropriation for the
building of the bridge over the Michi-
gan Central tracks and the Huron river
on Broadway. There was a majority
of 914 votes for this proposition out
of a total ballot of 2278.
The citizens also favored the exten-
sion of the eastern and western city
boundaries, the appropriation of $800
for a city entertainment fund, and the
bonding of the county for $40,000 for
the erection of a new poor house. The
latter proposition, however, seems
likely to be finally defeated by the
vote in the country districts of the
county.
The fourth ward witnessed the hot-
test fighting of the entire election,
when the voters here gave J. C. Her-
rick a majority over Herman Krapf
in the race for supervisor, despite
the fact that the latter has represent-
ed this ward for many years. They also
favored E. o. Wood over W. A. Com-
stock when the former regent of the
university was give n majority by the
rest of the city, and voted 175 to 149
against the rewriting of the city char-
ter. It was a complete Democratic
landslide for this ward.
In the Lace for Democratic national
committeeman, E. O. Wood was far
ahead of W. A. Comstock when incom-
plete returns from the state had been
counted. All indications point to the
former's victory-
Henry Ford, of Detroit, was running
ahead of William Alden Smith in the
Republican presidential primary, when
33 of the 83 counties of the state had
been heard from. Detroit gave the
automobile king a majority of 3000
votes in 210 of 215 precincts.
The drys gained two counties, Ba-
raga and Clare, and the victory in
the former means the gaining of a
foothold in the Upper Peninsula, the
strongest wet section. Thirteen coun-
ties voted, and nine of them were
wet before the election. It was dic-
tinctly a big victory for the prohibi-
tion element.

Give "All Frosh"
Dance April 21
Shook's J-Hop Orchestra to Furnish
usic for Annual
Affair
An "All-Frosh" dance which is her-
alded as the most pretentious affair
of the freshman year, is scheduled at
the Armory for Friday evening, April
21. Shook's J-Hop orchestra has been
secured to furnish music, and with
elaborate (decorations, special pro-
grams and favors, the affair is expect-
ed to rival any of the upper class fes-
tivities. Dancing will be from 8:00
to 1:00 o'clock. Refreshments will
be served.
Tickets will be on sale at the Union
to freshmen only on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday of this week from 10:00
to 12:00 and from 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
After that time the ticket sale will
be thrown open to the campus gen-
erally.
Debt Of England
Tripled_24 War
Chancellor of Exchequer Presents As-
tounding Figures to
Commons
London. April 4.-With a forecast
that the European war will last at
least another year, Chancellor of the
Exchequer McKenna fairly staggered
the house of commons this afternoon
with an array of figures showing the
war cost in dollars and cents. Then
he introduced the government budget.-
England's national debt, he pointed
out, has nearly tripled since the war
began. In 1914 it was $3,580,000. At
present, he said, it is nearly $11,700,-?
000,000. England is spending $25,-
000,000 daily for war purposes, it was
shown.
'FRENCH LINE LOCK
NEW GERMAN ATTACK
Teuton Assault Near Douaumont Re-
pulsed With Heavy Losses for 1
Germans
London, April 4.-The French line
north of Verdun blocked today a new1
and lavishly planned attempt of the,
Germans to -break through in the;
Douaumont sector. The assault made
at 3:00 o'clock this afternoon on the
first line French trenches 300 metersl
south of Douaumout village was com-1
pletely repulsed and the Germans were;
thrown back with heavy losses.
Large forces .were lost in the at-
tack which was made in the wave1
formation which has been used so per-
sistently by the Germans in these
rushes. Early in the day the German
heavy guns, which had decreased their
fire, took up the bombardment again1
with great violence, preparatory to the
advance of the infantry.
As the Germans climbed out of their
trenches for the assault, the French
fire curtain was lowered and the Ger-
man lines pressing forward toward
the trenches protected by this fire'
were cut down one after another until
the remnants of the organization of
the field fall back in disorder to the
Bois Chaufour. The attacking forces
were pursued by the French artillery
fire as they fell back, suffering con-
siderable losses.
French Counter Attack Makes Progress
A German attack was also made this
afternoon against the village of Hau-
court, just south of Malancourt. This

attack also, the French war office
says, was completely repulsed. While
the two German attacks, one on each
side of the river, were being repulsed,
the French announce that their own
counter attack in the Bois Caillette
region continued to make progress.
These counter attacks, which yester-
day had cleared the Bois Caillette,
(Continued on Page SIx)

EIGHT CHOSEN To
MEDICL SOCIETYI
Alpha Omega Alpha, National Honor
Organization, Elects Members
From Junior Class
TIHRIEE FA CfLTY MEN TAKEN IN
Alpha Omega Alpha, national honor
medical society, has honored five ju-
niors by electing them to membership.
The students who were chosen are:
Roland S. Cron, Herman H. Cole, Har-
ther L. Keim, John B. Grant and Roy
L. Laird. Dr. R .Bishop Canfield, Dr.
Udo J. Wile and Dr. Albert M. Ba-
rett of the faculty were also elected
at this time.
Election to the society is based on
scholarship in the medical school. It
is the custom to take in five juniors
in the spring and these mn will elect
five more of their class next fall.
The initiation and banquet will be
held at the Michigan Union soon after
the spring recess.
RESUME CAMIGN
ON CAMPUS TODAY,
Health Service Starts Investigation
Against Tuberulosis In
Literary College
D I S T R 1 B UTE QUESTIONNAIRES
The health service campaign against
tuberculosis will be started in the lit-
erary college this morning when the
questionnaires, which are being dis-
tributed by the service, will be hand-
ed out and filled in in the classes of
the college. Dean John R. Effinger
has given the necessary permission
to allow the students to take about
five minutes during each hour for this
purpose.
The committee in charge of the cam-
paign has asked that the question
blanks be filled out carefully and con-
scientiously if for no other reason
than that of "fair play" to one's neigh-
bors. The replies, they say, will be
treated confidentially, and will be used
only as a means of bringing aid to
afflicted students.
Questionnaires, filled out by the ju-
nior and freshman classes of the en-
gineering college, were received yes-
terday by the health service, and as
soon as they can be examined, letters
will be sent out to those whose symp-
toms are similar to those found in tu-
berculosis cases.
In the blanks received yesterday,
members of the health service staff
said, there was some tendency to treat
the matter lightly, but the staff hopes
that the questions will be answered
truthfully in order to aid the service
as much as possible in making the sur-
vey.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* Women's League Election Returns *
* x*
* Final returns on the Women's *
* League election were announced *
* at a late hour last night to be *
* as follows: President, Margar- *
* et Reynolds, '17, vice president, *
* Albertine Loomis, '17, treasurer, *
* Olive Hartsig, '17, recording *
* secretary, Clarissa Vyn, '18, *
* corresponding secretary, Anna *
* Lloyd, '18, senior director, Jean- *%

* ette Armstrong, '17, junior di- *
* rectors, Louise Gould, '18, and *
* Constance Winchell, '18, sopho- *
* more director, Ruth Ely, '19. *
* The retiring board will en-
* tertain the incoming officers this *
* evening at supper, at the home * .
* of Ruth Brown, '16. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * I

Junior Play Jcets TROOPS CLASH WITH ILLA FORCE
Approval Of Mene
Appr lFOR SECONDTIME;CAV YFINDS
"The Yanke e 1ogi" Rep eat s ior me u i t S E T .9 U 9 C 1 I T
1nthusiasticallyBNISCVS OAUACLET

Repeating their successes of its open-
ing performance, the Junior girls gave
two performances of "The Yankee
Yogi," yesterday, afternoon and eve-
ning.sMen were admitted to thereve-
ning show for the first time on record,
and by their enthusiastic applause tes-
titled to their approval. The song hits
as in the first performance, were the
"Bluffers' Chorus," and "Dreaming of
You."
'Over 70 girls took part in the dif-
rent choruses. The cast is as follows:
Asayo, a Japenese princess..Inez Gose
Nukata ...............Adele Cratidall
Katisha................Helen Bush
Ladies in Waiting
Jogen, a hermit priest..Anita Kelley
Richard Brown, from Ann Arbor...
Ruberta Woodworth
Mrs. Brown ...........Helen Richey
Mr. Brown .............Eva Sharrow
Richard's parents
Mary, Richard's fiancee..Olive Hartsig
Annette, Mary's French maid......
Gladys Whelan
Kosa, a Japanese prince..........
Christine Stringer
Jun .................Eva Bradley
Aki ......,....t..Irene Litchman
Courtiers
De Mascaville, French artist....
Lavinia MaBride
Japanese Messenger... Hazel Giddings
BUSRAK MEDICAL WER
CLAIMS_THIRD, LIFE
Mrs. . I. Rennett, '071, Dies of Fever;
Survived by Husband
and One Son
News of the death on Wednesday,
March 29, by typhoid fever, of Mrs.
Christine I. Bennett, '07M, one of the
missionaries in Busrah, was received
yesterday by Mr. W. H. Tinker, sec-
retary of the Students' Christian Asso-
ciation. No particulars are known.
The death of Mrs. Bennett marks
the sacrifice of another life to the
medical work at Busrah. Mrs. Bennett
is survived by her husband and one
son, who will both probably return
to American some time during the
coing summer.
Mrs. Christine Bennett is the second
wife of Dr. Bennett and the third
Michigan graduate whose life has been
given to Busrah missionary work.
Dr. Bennett's first wife, Mrs. Jessie
Vail Bennett, '03, died at Busrah in
1906. Dr. J. S. Thoms, '98M, died
there in 1914.
LECTURER TO TALK ON SOAPS
Joseph Abraham to Demonstrate Man-
ufacture with Miniature Plant
Demonstrating his talk with the aid
of a miniature soap plant, Joseph
Abraham, of Frederick Stearns & Co.,
of Detroit, will give a lecture on "The
Manufacture of Toilet Soaps," at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in room 165
of the chemistry building.
The apparatus, which is electrically
driven, is complete in every detail,
and will have to be brought from De-
troit on a truck. The lecture is given
under the auspices of the Prescott
club of the College of Pharmacy and
is open to the public.
.Hold Initiation Banquet Tomorrow
Aristolochites, honorary pharmaceu-
tical society, will hold an initiation
banquet at the Delta Cafe tomorrow
evening at 6:00 o'clock. The program
will include toasts by members of the
faculty of the College of Pharmacy
and officers of the society.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* -:*<
.,: "Open season" for fresh caps *
begins April 20, according to a *
Secisio mae lst night by the :*
~Student Council. On that day
* the "frosh" will assemble and *
* march in a body to the Olivet *
* game, wearing their spring *
* headgear. Appropriate music *
* will be furnished by the Var- *
sity band. '
* *
MiCHIGAN MEN TO
160 Ien Signify Willingness to Enter
leserves After Lecture by
Vol. inilliat
START WORK AFTER VACA T1)N
About 160 students signified their
willingness to enter a "crack" drill
compVny and the eighth division of
the Michigan Naval Reserve at the
close of the lecture by Colonel L. R.
Ginilliat in Hill auditorium last
night.
The drill company will be under
the direction of Major C. E. Wilson of
the Michigan National Guard, while
the naval division will be organized
by K. W. Heinrich, '16E, a former
commissioned officer of the U. S.
Navy.
Practices in both branches will be-
gin directly after the vacation. Ap-
plication for places in either corps
(Continued on Page Six)

COLORED RE(AIENT SCATTERS
BANI) IN RUNNING EN-
( A V E MENT
LEADER'S LOCATION UNKNOWN
D)ivision of Followers Makes Prsult
Difficult; Safety Pancho's
Only Plan, Is Report
El Paso, April 4.United States
troops clashed for a second time with
the bandits under Pancho Villa, the
fight taking place Sunday near Agua
Caliente, twenty miles northeast of
Bach inaba, where reports yesterday
said the bandits had been located.
This information came through to
the American border this afternoon.
The American troops consisted of the
10th Cavalry, colored, under com--
mand of Colonel Brown. The cavalry
dasned- upon the bandits while they
Were preparing dinner, and their
mounts were g-razing. Between 30
and 40 of the bandits were killed and
30 or more , horses were captured by
the American troops. No mention is-
made of American losses.
After defeating the bandits the
troops under Colonel Brown followed
them for several miles across the
Rancho San Antonio where the band-
its scattered and escaped. As the
country is rough in the vicinity it is
believed that the bandits fled to the
hills singly or in pairs as they did
at San Geronimo last Wednesday.
Persh ing's Location 'Uknown
Correspondents with the Persh-
ing expedition had been prohibited
sending out anything on the second
fight until tonight. General Perlh-
ing's message reporting the fight was
sent from his advance headquarters
somewhere in the vicinity of Guerrero
and was wired direct to General
Funston, who repeated it to General
George Bell, commanding the border
patrol at El Paso. ,iven General
Funston and all staff officers in camp
at the two bases at Casas Grandes
and Numiuipa claim not to know his
exact whereabouts. He went south in
order to be near the men actually
hunting Villa, and has not reported
his location. tI is said he may have
been in command at Sunday's battle.
It is not known if Villa was with
the hand when the Americans over-
took and vanquished it Sunday.
Indian Scouts to Be Used
If Villa is wounded, as American
and Mexican advices both claim, he
is believed to be hidden somewhere
in the. mountains in the vicinity of
Guerrero, and United States infantry
is being sent to that region , from
Casas Grandes to scale the crags and
peaks in a hunt for him. Indian
scouts from Fort Apache, Arizona, are
being sent into Mexico to lead the
infantry in its hunt. If the banqit
leader is not wounded the general
belief is that he has slipped south of
Guerrero and is attempting to make
his waya into the interior of Mexico
as far as his tired horses can take
him from the American border and
the American troops.
Nobody here knows tonight, so far
as can be learned, where Villa is. The
American forces .admit they have lost
him, and the Carranza officials re-
luctantly make the same admission.
All claim that Villa is in the region
but these statements ai'e merely sur-
mises.
Villa Disguises Himself, Is Report
The fact that Villa forces have in-
tentionally or otherwise been split
into so many bands makes it impos-
sible for the Carranza or American
forces to say what band he is ac-
companying. Reports are going the
rounds that he has grown a long

beard and that he has shaved his mus-
tache.

WHAT'SGOINGO

,I

\Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity - Moderate west to northwest
winds.
TODAY
4:00 o'clock-Mrs. E. H. McCormack
lectures on newspaper work, room 202,
West hall.
4:14 o'clock-Joseph Abraham, of
Frederick Stearns and Co., talks on
the "Manufacture of Toilet Soaps," in
room 165, Chemistry building.
4:15 o'clock-Mr. Claude Bragdon
speaks on "Organic Architecture,"
west physics lecture room.
7:15 o'clock-Meeting of cross coun-
try men, election of officers, trophy
room, Waterman gymnasium.
7:30 o'clock -- Menorah smoker,
Michigan Union.
8:00 o'clock-Adelphi-Jefferson cup
debate, room B, Law building.
8:00 o'clock-Mr. Claude Bragdon
speaks on "Art and Geometry," west
physics lecture room.
8:00 o'clock - Henry H. Hower
speaks on the Knight motor, room 348,
Engineering building.
- TOMORROW
5:00 o'clock - Alpha Nu-Webster
cub debate, room B, Law building.
9:30 o'clock-Regents' meeting, re-
gents' room, Law building.
U-1NOTICE S
Today and tomorrow at 1:00 o'clock,
All-Fresh baseball practice, Waterman
gymnasium.
Mr. Bryson's 'classes in newspaper
writing will not meet today. Members
are expected to attend the lecture by
Mrs. McCormack this 'afternoon at
4:00 o'clock.

* * *. * * * * * *
LATE ELECTION RETURNS
At a late hour last night word
was received from the Detroit
Free Press News Service that
with returns in from 55 of the
83 counties in the state of Michi-
gan, Henry Ford's lead in the
Republican presidential primary
has been decreased to a 2,000
majority.
E. 0. Wood has been safely
elected over former Regent W.
A. Comstock as Democratic na-
tional committeemen.
* * * * * * * * * * *

DON'T MISS THE

I

APRIL
21

FROSH FROLIC
AT THE ARMORY
Tiokets cn Sale {Aprilth, 7th, and 8th-Fresh only At the Union
TicketsOpen tO Campus /April 10th

PRICE
$

I-

1916

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