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April 02, 1916 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE, MICI4IGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

ff /
/ 11
I i f\ N
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0-

Bicycles
Sundries
Rep airing

LOWEST
PRICES

Base Ball Goods

'Indoor Balls

H. L. SW ITZER CO.
Hardware and Sporting Goods - - 310 STATE

Jim

Trunks, Bags, Suit
If you are thinking of anything in this
G ases' line, we are reasonably sure of saving
you something. Our selling expense
enables us to sell for less. Will you let us show you?
Hoag s Home Supply Store
209-211 East Washington Street

learning other than those he had made
peculiarly his own. But distinguished
as Dr. Angell was as scholar, educator
and diplomat, I have always thought
he was greatest as a personality. The
purity of his life, the charm of his
manner, his wisdom in a purely hu-
man sense, and his friendly sympathy
with the countless people who came in
contact with him made him a great
and influential man. It will not be
given to most of us to see his like
again."
Professor Henry C. Adams
"The secret of Dr. Angell's power
is found in his keen instinctive sym-
pathy with life in all its phases, and
in the faith he was ever ready to
show in his fellowmen. His personal
life, as also his administration of the
University, afford us the highest ex-
pression we shall ever see of the power
of optimism."
Iean Wilmert B. Hinsdale
"In the death of President-Emeri-
tus Angell, the University and the
state of Michigan loses a great char-
acter, moving to sorrow people in
every community of the country."
HISTORY OF LIFE SHOWS
LONG AND USEFUL CAREER
(Continued from Page One)
of the university until ,June, 1909
when his resignation was accepted by
the board of regents. These 38 years
of educational service for Michigan
were broken only by the absence of
the president for a few years, when
the national government saw fit to
call him to the assistance of the na-
tion.
Made Minister to China.
His first service for the United States
government was in 1880, when he was
sent as minister to China for the ex-
press purpose of negotiating two
treaties with that nation relative to
the annoying immigration problem and
general commerce. The settlement ef-
fected by him placed him as one of
the foremost diplomats of his time.
So effective was his work that the gov-.
ernment employed him in 1887 as en-
voy plentipotentiary on the commis-
sion which made the North Atlantic
Fisheries treaty with Great Britain.
He has ever been a leader in the
Congregational church and presided
at the International Congregational
Council which met in Boston in Sep-
tember, 1899. This body was compos-
ed of delegates from all parts of the
world and represented the scholastic
and ecclesiastical organization of the
church in the persons of its most dis-
tinguished members.
Giranted Many ieg'rees
His scholarship has been universal-
ly recognized. The degree of LL.D.
was conferred upon him by the fol-
lowing institutions: Brown Univer-
sity, 1868; Columbia University, 1887;
Rutgers College, 1896; Princeton Uni-
versity, 1896; Yale University, 1901;
Johns Hopkins University, 1902; Uni-
versity of Wisconsin. 1904; Harvard
University, 1905.
Among the books he wrote are:
"Reminiscences," "Selected Addres-
ses," "Progress in International Law,"
and "Higher Education."?
President-Emeritus Angell is a mem-
ber of the American Philosophical So-

many years he served as regent of the
Smithsonian Institute at Washington.
Retires in 1909
President Angell tendered his resig-
nation to the board of regents to take
effect in June, 1905, but due to his
brilliant record and the deep apprecia-
tion in which this body held their
leader, the regents would not hear of
his resignation and induced him,
against his will, to continue in office.
He offered his resignation a second
time in 1909, refusing to allow the
sentiment of his friends to interfere
with what he considered his duty, giv-
ing the plea that he be allowed to lay
down the 'eins of administration.
His resignation was accepted and the
honorary title of president-emeritus
conferred upon him. His work as
president ceased in June. 1909, but
he continued to teach classes in in-
ternational law, until March, 1913.
He is survived by his brother, Wil-
liam Angell, two sons, Dean James R.
Angell, '90, of the University of Chi-
cago, and Alexis C. Angell, '78, a prom-
inent lawyer in Detroit, and until re-
cently a judge of the state of Mich-
igan; and one daughter, Mrs. A. C.
McLaughlin, professor at the Uni-
versity of Chicago. James B. Angell,
president of the senior lit class, is his
grandson.

"LISTEN 10 THiS!",

HENRY&COPN
TAILORS TO MEN WHO KNOW
Directly North of Law Building

REASONABLE $30 AND VP

Just received another ship
ment of Spring Woolens for
your selection of that New
Suit.

tA

MAJESTIC

DOCTOR ANGELL
PASSE AWYA
NOONSTRA
(Continued from Page Onte)
there was not immediate danger on
Wednesday, the sons returned to their
homes, while Mrs. McLaughlin re-
mained in Ann Arbor. William An-
gell,- brother of the deceased, who has
been in Ann Arbor for the past sever-
al weeks, was at the bedside at the
time of Dr. Angell's peaceful death.
Judge Alexis C. Angell, of Detroit,
and James R. Angell, of Chicago, were
summoned to Ann Arbor yesterday
morning when it became evident that
Dr. Angell was sinking rapidly. They
reached this city on afternoon trains
a short time after their father's death.
The funeral will be held at the
house at 2:30 tomorrow afternoon,
and burial will take place in Forest
Hill cemetery. At the request of the
immediate relatives, all thought of a
public funeral was given up, and
the services will be very simple, in
accordance with their wishes.
Accommodations will be provided at
the house for as many members of the
faculty as possible. Those unable
to gain entrance to the house will as-
semble on the lawn. Realizing the
desire on the part of large numbers
of students to have some part in the
ceremonies President Hutchins ex-
pressed a wish that, if the weather
permits, student of the university con-
gregate on the grounds during the
progress of the services.
Memorial services will be held in
Hill auditorium within a few weeks, at
which both faculty and students will
be present.

Word was received yesterday after-
noon from Providence, R. I., that Mrs.
Coggeshall, an aged sister of Dr. An-
gell's, was starting for this city and
would be present at the funeral. Rev.
Lloyd C. Douglas, pastor of the Con-
gregational Church, will officiate.
UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS EULOGIZE
PRESIDENT - EMERITUS ANGELL
(Continued from Page One)
inspiration."
Isaac N. Demmon
"The first words that come to mind
in contemplating the long career of
Dr. Angell are, poise, serenity, be-
nignity. With a keen insight into
human nature on its good side and
on its bad side, he maintain'ed through-
out the years a steadiness of mind and
spirit that marked him a great man.
He firmly believed in the forces that
make for good. The event fulfilled his
faith, and he has finished his earthly
course crowned with blessing and
honor."
Dean Victor C. Vaughan
"Dr. Angell was one of the great
men of the generation. As an educa-
tor, he did great work not only for
Michigan, but for the whole country.
As a diplomat, he was exceedingly
wise, and rendered a service to our
country not yet fully appreciated. As
a man he was considerate of others,
just in all of his decisions, and lovable
in character."
])ean Henry f1. Bates
"Dr. Angell will always rank as one
of the most eminent and influential
figures in American education. Few
men have equalled him in breadth of
vision and catholicity of knowledge.
He was constantly surprising even
those who had known him for many
years with his deep interest and pro-
found knowledge in many fields of
HOUR! I

Back to Good Old Vaudeville
Starting Monday Night 7:30-9
Daily thereafter 3-7:30 & 9 P. M.
Co-Star with Harry Lauder one Season
TRAVOTO
The EceentrIe Violinist
The laughing hit of the year
ED BLONDELL & CO.
"The Lost Boy"
Van and Belle
Boomerang Birds
Conners and Wit
"Melodious Monarch's of Song Land"
The Anchor Trio
Sensational Acrobats

TOD'AY,
SUNDAY
1:30-3-7 and 8:30
Vivian Martin
IN
Israe anwlI's
Masterpiece
,erely Mary
Ann"
A Play of Love Romance
and above all, Optimism
Directed by John CI.Adofl,

CAM IN
TBURS

"CART*R, The Magician"

Seats - - 10 cts.

V "4m
NOA

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You'll say it when you try
these made-to-measure clothes on be-
fore a mirror-when you search for
flavs you can't find -- when you look for
wrinkles that aren't there.

T h e advantage of
having suits specially
tailored to measure is
shown by the well
dressed appearance of
men who w e a r the
clothes--t h e y aren't
expensive.

We've an -almost
countless number of
fine woolens for you to
choose frorn-e v e r y
one sparklingly orig-
inal and unordinary--
you'll find t h e m to
your liking.

ciety of Philadelphia,
Antiquarian Society of
American Academy of
ences of Boston, and
Historical Association,
was president in 1893.
a charter member of
Academy at Rome and
of International Law.

the American
Worcester, the
Arts and Sci-
the American
of .which he
Dr. Angell is
the American
of the Society
He is a cor-

Dress
Suits

I .Macl

Shirts
Made
to
Order

to
Hire

604 E. LIBERTY

responding member of the Massa-
chusetts Historical Society and of the
Colonial Society of Massachusetts. For

I

$10 AN

A SECRET,
IS SOMETHING

Sit down and make up a two
word slogan for our business
and the money is yours.
All slogans must be handed
in not latter than Tuesday,
April 4, 6 P. M.
Anyone can compete.

That there is no fun in until you tell it to the other fellow-he in turn gets his fun out of it
in the same good old way and after that it ceases to be a secret-from which it just naturally
follows that "there ain't no such animal" since a secret is something that is not.

THE

RENELLEN

HOSPICE

A PLACE OF DISTINCTIVE SERVICE

Is very decidedly something that is and what is more it is, because you like it and tell your
friends about it--after all it is what you think-of us and say of us and not what we may think
and say of ourselves, that really counts.

Goldman Bros.
Scientifio CLEANERS Odorless
202 S. STATE ST.

We serve tixe linest one dollar dinner in the city and this is
no secret - they all say so and we admit it.

oix~t4~ dZ~

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