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April 02, 1916 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-02

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THE DAILY
$1.00
N E'WS OF THE WORLD ANDI
THE CAMPUS

HIGAN o

La

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGIAP SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 129.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

E

,~ 3
t

RUSSIANS CEASE
ATTACK IN EST;I
LOSE 140,9OO MEN
OFFENSIVE UNSUCCESSFUL A L -
TIOUGHl MUNITIONS WERE
PLENTFUL
GERMANS SHIFT AT VERDUN
Asault Jumps to Sector East of Meuse
RIver; Foothold Gained in
Village of Vaux
Berlin, April 1.-The Russian of-
fensive against Field Marshal von Hin-
denburg's army on the north part of
the eastern front has now ceased, ac-
cording to the official statement is-
sued by the German war office today.
In this offensive, which began on
March 18 and continued until March
30, the statement says, the Russian
losses by careful calculations are 140,-
000 men out of the 500,000 engaged,
although this offensive was supported
by an "unprecedented amount of mu-
nitions."
The Russians gained no success by
this general assault. The "reduction
of the enemy on the frontier of the
kingdom" appears to have been the
purpose of the offensive, according to
a Russian war office order.
GERIIAN OFFENSE SHIFTS.
Paris, April 1.-The German offen-
sive against Verdun, which was re-
sumed last Wednesday with an attack
on the Avoucourt sector to the west
of the Meuse, jumped on Thursday to
the Douaumont sector, east of the
Meuse, and yesterday returned to the
western bank with a successful attack
on the village of Malancourt.
Teutons Gain in Vaux
The attack gained for the Germans a
foothold in the western part of the vil-
lage of Vaux, in the eastern part of
which they gained several houses in
the assault Sf March 11. Last night's
successes apparently gave the Ger-
mans practical control of the village,
'which lies to the northeast of the
.iIgher ground on which the fort bear-
ing the same name is situated. On the
occasion of the earlier German suc-
cess here, the Germans sought to push
on north of the fort, but were repulsed.
Last night German successes were
won by the second of two heavy at-
tacks.
These attacks covered the sector be-
tween the wood to the south of Hau-
droumont and the region of the Vaux.
The first assault, which was in the
nature of a surprise, was upon the
village to the north and the south
at the same time, but failed to reach
the French line on either side of the
village. A second attempt was made
immediately. By this attempt the
Germans were able to get a footing
in the western part of. the village.
Bombardment Precedes Attack
A heavy bombardment of the ravine
by the Fort Douaumont and the Vaux
village was begun by the German ar-
tillery this morning. This was follow-
ed by an infantry attack which was
blocked completely by the French fire.
On the eastern bank of the river there
was a bombardment today of the
French position between Avoucourt
and Malancourt.
ZEPP RAID GILLS 2
London, April 1.-Twenty-eight were
killed and 44 injured in last night's
Zeppelin raid on England, the admir-
alty announces this afternoon.
One of the raiding Zeppelins, the

L-15, was wrecked and brought downj
on the mouth of the Thames, 45 miles1
east of London, and its crew captured
before it sank in the harbor. It was
one of the latest models.
Arriving off the east coast at about
8:00 o'clock last' night, the airships
divided into two squadrons, one going
eastward and the other taking a more
(Continued on Page Six)

Ilichigan Wins
flid- West fl9eba te
Vote of 2 to 1 Gives Wolverines the
Decision Over Illinois
at Urbana
Michigan won from Illinois in the
second annual Mid-West league tri-
angular debate at Urbana Friday
night by a vote of 2-1. The contest
was close from start to finish. The
judges who awerded their votes to
Michigan said that they did so only
because the Michigan men seemed to
have a better knowledge of the facts
involved in the debate.
Illinois defeated Wisconsin in the
third debate of the triangular contest
by a vote of 2-1. The results were
exactly the same in all three cases
last year, Michigan being victorious
in both her contests.
The men on Michigan's negative
team who won at Urbana were: George
C. Claassen, 17L, William E. Olds,
'16, and Kenneth M. Stevens, '16L.+
"I'll Just Have to
Wait-- and See"
Sam Bayliss, for 32 Years Dr. Angell's
Personal Servant, Has No
Plans for Future
"No, sah, I haven't got any plans+
for the futuah. I'll-I'll just have,
to wait-and-and see.'
Sam Bayliss, trusted body servant
of Dr. Angell, stared mournfully at
the floor. "I've been right hea thir-
ty-two yeahs, sah. Came in the fall
of eighty-fouh, and have been heah
evah since. All the time Doctah Angell
was 'way off in China, I stayed heah
and kept things straight. Evah since
I was sixteen yeahs old, sah.
"Today, ev'rything's all wrong. We
all feel it, sah, we all feel it.
"No, sah, I ain't got any plans for
the futuah. I'll just have to wait-~+
and see."
Junior Girls Give
Two Performances
Production Open to General Public for
First Time Tuesday; Matinee
Replaces Saturday Show
Two performances of the Junior
Girls' Play, "A Yankee Yogi," will be
given Tuesday. The matinee which
was to be given yesterday will be
given Tuesday afternoon at 3:30
o'clock.
Those having tickets for Saturday's'
matinee who wish to come will be ad-
mitted to the afternoon performance.
The evening performance will be open
to the general public. Seats will go
on sale in University hall at 8:00
o'clock Tuesday morning. Scores of
the play may be obtained in Univer-
sity hall or at the performance.
The story of the play is woven
around the Japanese princess, Asayo,
who has lost a token by which she is
to know her true lover. Aide by an
American, Asayo recovers her token
and lover, after a number of experi-
ences, which are ingeniously develop-
ed and well acted.
The features of the play are the spot-
light dance of American girls and a
dance by Grecian girls. The song hits
are "College Memories," an Ann Ar-
bor song, and "The Bluffers," a "take-
off" on various members of the facul-
ty.
high School Training Directors Meet
TIhe annual meting of physical train-

ing directors of the various high
schools represented at the Schoolmas-
ter's convention was held yesterday
afternoon in the trophy room of Wa-
terman gymnasium. The representa-
tives met for the purpose of discuss-
ing baseball, football, track, and bas-
ketball rules for the coming year, and
to secure if possible better regulation
of games through reform affecting the
officials of the sports.

VOTE TOMOROW
ON QUESTION OF HISN'~HE

Material for First Issue
Printers During
Vacation

Inlander Staff
To Decide Policy

Goes to

WOMEN TO BALLOT ON
QUESTIONS OF DIRECT
EXPENDIT1'UR E

ALL

HOLD LAST OPEN DISCUSSION'
Citizens Hear City Manager 'pton of
Dayton, Ohio; Speaks Before
100 in High School
At the annual spring election tomor-
row, April 3, the voters will decide
upon a revision of the city charter, a
proposition to bond the county of
Washtenaw for $40,000, the raising of
$25,000 by loan, and the appropriating
of $800 for the entertainment fund. In
addition to these general measures the
election of aldermen, supervisors, and
constables from each ward, and 11
commissioners for the rewriting of the
city charter will be held.
The bonding measure has as its
purpose the erection of a new Poor
House on the farm owned by the coun-
ty. The $25,000 loan when raised will
be used for the building of a bridge
on Broadway north of the M. C. R. R.
bridge. The entertainment fund of
$800 is to be paid out upon the dis-
cretion of the common council for
the providing of such public amuse-
ment as the members of the council
shall see fit.
In addition to local questions, the
primary election of all presidential
candidates from the several parties
will be included on the ballot, as well
as the member of the National Com-
mittee of the political parties of the
state.
The polls will be open from 7:00
o'clock in the morning until 8:00
o'clock at night in the following
places: First ward, voting room in
basement of City hall; second ward,
ward building on S. Ashley St., third
ward, ward building on Miller Ave.;
fourth ward, voting place in basement
of New Armory on Fifth Ave.; fifth
ward, ward building on Swift St.;
sixth ward, voting room in basement
of Tappan school on East University
Ave.; seventh ward, ward building on
Mary street.
Women electors are qualified to vote
upon all questions involving a direct
expenditure of money.
The final open discussion of the
questions now before the people of
Ann Arbor was held in the high school
auditorium last night after City Mana-
ger Upton of Dayton, Ohio, spoke to
an audience of nearly 400 people.
Mr. Upton lauded the commission
manager plan, saying that of the 300
odd cities in the United States which
have already adopted the commission
form of government, approximately 75
of them now have city managers. He
said that the plan was an unqualified
success in Dayton.
Mr. Chas. Sink was chairman of
the open meeting and discussed the
real meaning of the vote which the
city was about to take, in an effort to
dispel the incorrect idea held by
many that the city manager plan is
being voted upon. Its adoption or re-
jection cannot come until after the
voters have decided whether or not
they want to revise the charter.
Previous to the meeting a banquet
was held in the gymnasium.

Whether material having local ap-
plication shall be accepted or rejected
by the staff of The Inlander is a ques-
tion which has been much discussed
by those in control of the publication.
This will be settled definitely at the
next meeting to be held at 4:0 o'clock
Monday.
With but few exceptions the articles,
poems and stories have been selected
for the first issue, which will go to
press during the Easter vacation, or
shortly after it.
The business staff is not entirely
picked as yet, and Hugo Wagenseil,
'16, business manager of The Inlander,
has announced that there are several
vacancies still to be filled. Kenneth
Keyes, '17, and R. C. Patterson. '18.
have been appointed assistants to the
business manager, one of whom will
serve in the capacity of business man-
ager next year.
CAST OF 'MIQUETTE ET
SA MERE' ANNOUNCED
Annual Cercle Francais Production
Will be Staged at Whitniey
On April 27
Announcement was made yesterday
of the names of the students who will
have the principal parts in the cast
of "Miquette et sa Mere," the French
comedy which will be given at the
Whitney theater by the Cercle Fran-
cais on April 27.
The cast is as follows:
Miquette Grandier.Adele Crandall, '17
\me. Grandier.. .Marie Cornwell, '17
Marquis de la Tour Mirande......
.............. . L . J. Kirby, '17L
Urbain de la Tour Mirande.......
.............Manuel del Valle, '16E
Mongrebin...........Heney Hill,. '17
Monchablon.......1L. S. Thompson, '18
Mile. Poche.......... .Mary Kerr, '18
Perine .. . ...........Mary Johns, '16
Lahirel.....Chester L. Fordney, '16E
Labouret .........Rodney Parker, '16
Pierre .............Thos. C. Reid; '17
Le concierge . .F. Vernon Sellers, '17
L'employe....Gordon Campbell, '17E
The roles of Mme. Michelot, Mme.
Majoumel Lili, Ponette and Toto will
be taken by Mary Walsh, '16, Mildred
Bachers, '16, and Katherine Doherty,
'is.
"Miquette et sa Mere" was written
by Flers and Caillavet, two famous
French writers of comedy, the second
of whom died recently. Their work is
well known in other countries as well
as in France and the comedy which
the Cercle Francais has chosen is one
of their best.
S. 3. LEVIN,'12, LECTURES
,ho MNUORvAl TONI T
"The Personality of Juda P. Ben-
jamin," is the subject of an address
that will be delivered before the Men-
orah society by Samuel M. Levin, '12
in Newberry hall at 8:00 o'clock to-
night. The address will include an
account of the life of Benjamin as a

Women's League Election
Election of officers of the
Women's league for the year
1916-1917 will be held Tuesday,
April 4. Ballot boxes will be
placed in the library, and all
members are urged to vote.
Balloting will stop at 5:00
o'clock. The list of candidates
is as follows:
President, Anita Kelly, '17,
Margaret Long, '17, Margaret
Reynolds, '17.
Vice-president, Albertine Loo-
mis, '17, Margaret Basset, '17.
Treasurer, Hazel Giddings,
'17, Olive Hartsig, '17.
Recording secretary, Claris-
sa Vim, '18, Margaret Hender-
son, '18.
Corresponding secretary, Anna
Lloyd, '18, Marguerite Reis-
dorph, '17.
Senior director, Francis Way,
Geta Tucker, Jeanette Aim-
strong.
Junior director, Valora Qrin-
lan, Portia Walker, Constance
Winchell.
Sophdmore director, Mildred
Nighell, Marcia Pinkerton, R ith
Ely.
DEAN WHITE TO PREACH TODAY
"Can We Lose God?" Sermon Subject at
St. Andrew's Church
"Can We Lose God?" is the subject
which the Very Rev. Francis S. White,
Dean of St. Mark's Pro-Cathedral of
Grand Rapids, will preach upon in
St. Andrew's Episcopal church at 10:30
o'clock this morning. Dean White
will also speak at the evening serv-
ice at 7:30 o'clock on "How God Pays
Men."
During the past week, Dean White1
has been the speaker at the series
of noon-day Lenten services being held
in the Miles theater, Detroit, and he
made a deep impression on the hun-
dreds of business wren who came to
hear him every noon.

SOLDIES SUFFER FROM
OF RAIN AND SLEET
LAS' 4S HOURS

OPERATE ON 75 MILE FRONT
Army Aviators Troops Informed of
Position of Villistas; Re-
port New Raid
(By George H. Clements)
Field Headquarters, wireless Nami-
quipa, Chihuahua, Mexico, April .-
A close harch of the field after Colon-
el Dodd's fight with Villistas at San
Geronimo Wednesday found 60 dead.
There was no report as to the Mexican
wounded. Dodd had four men wound-
ed.
- The American soldiers are now oper-
ating over a front of 75 miles and
there is not a foot of that distance un-
covered. Six columns commanded by
Colonel Dodd are now operating, who
has under him a squadron of the 10th
Cavalry. Colonel Brown'has another
squadron of the 10th, and there is a
squadron of the 7th Cavalry under
Colonel Erwin.
It was Colonel Erwin's squadron
which engaged Villa at San Geronimo
and rounted him. Other commands
are Major Tompkins', with two troops
each from the 10th and 13th; Major
Lindsley's squadron from the 13th,
and the picked squadron of the 7th,
making a total of 2,500 men. Rem-
nants of Villa's forces are being pur-
sued with vigor. There is no report
as to Villa's whereabouts.
-Censored M. C. S.
Expect Early Capture
Now that it is established that Villa
was wounded Sunday in his battle
with the Carranzistas, American army
officers believe that it willb be but a
few days before his hiding place is
ferreted out and he is either captured
or killed.
Army aviators are keeping the head-
quarters constantly informed as to
the whereabouts of the flying rem-
nants of Villa's band, and the bandits
are being given no opportunity to rest
themselves or their poorly fed mounts.
The Villistas, broken into small
bands, have been unable to hide 'or
to make sorties because of the activ-
ity of the American aeroplane opera-
tors.
Soldiers Suffer from Cold
Officers and men are being given
a taste of what European soldiers in
the trenches have to suffer from the
weather. For the last 48 hours, rain
and sleet blown by strong cold winds
has made life in camp anything but a
joke. It was a relief from the dust of
the last 10 days, but uncomfortable
nevertheless.
The surrounding mountains are
covered with snow and the weather is
giving the aviators who are patrolling
the line of communication added
hardships. Crossing of the famous
Chocolate Pass is particularly ardu-

STORM
TO

VILL LOSES 80 IN DODD ATTACK;
SEARCH OfF FILD ADDS TO COUNT;
BANDIT LEADER STILL ATC' LIBERTY

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity- Fair with moderate 'west winds.
TODAY
10.-'30 o'clock-Dean White speaks,
St. Andrew's church.

6:30 o'clock--"Dad" Elliot speaks at
"Y" meeting on "The Challenge of the
Nation to the Colleges of Today," Ar-
7:30 o'clock - Pres. G. Campbell
White speaks, Presbyterian church.
Mi :-uOn c t-, e r Y m~

ous.

I.

First Metho
State Street, Corn
A. W. STALKER,
m s

lawyer, as an orator, and as a states-! 3 os
man. It will also deal with his con- St. Andrew's church.
nection with the Confederacy, of which 8:00 o'clock--Samuel M. Levin, '12,
he was attorney general. After the speaks at Menorah meeting, Newberry
address by Mr. Levin, the meeting hall.
will be thrown open to discussion.
TOMORROW
2:30 o'clock--The funeral of Presi-'
d ist C hurch dent Emeritus James B. Angell from
dthe Angell residence on South Uni-
ier ofWashington versity avenue.
D. D., MINISTER U'.NOTICES
There will be no examination in
apparatus work in connection with
"What Is Peace?" women's gymnasium work next week.
andon's "Call of the Wild" Girls participating in Junior Girls'
dPlay will report for Tuesday matinee
at time set for Saturday matinee.

The army considers Colonel Dodd's
exploit in surrounding and battling
with Villa's bandits on Wednesday
near Guerrero a remarkable bit of
work that adds greatly to the laurels
of the cavalry. Nothing has been re-
ceived here to confirm the purpose
from the border of the capture of
Villa at Minaca, south of Guerrero.
MINING COMPANY RAIDED
El Paso, April,1.-Advices from Chi-
raided the property of the Cotosi Mining
huahua City tonight say bandits today
company,several miles west of that
city, and robbed the paymaster of all
the company's funds. It is not known
whether any Americans were killed in
the raid. The bandits are supposed to
be the advance guard of Villa's band,
which is fleeing American soldiers.

Morning Subject:

- -0

Evening

Jack L

III

F.;

[

TONIGHT
7:30 O'CLOCK

President J. Campbell White
Wooster University
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH'

I FRED LAWTON
SPEARS TO

C. E SOCIETY

6:30 P.M

I

r _

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