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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 21, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M ~ICH{IGAN DAILY

- ,.

JSTOM MADE CLOTHES

have an air of distinction, a richness of
finis a"d pan assurance of correct style
tat stamp thse wearer as a man of good
taste and dignity.

G. H. WILD COMPANY
EADING MERCHANT TAILORS STATE ST.
Second Semester.
TEXT S
NEW and SECOND HAND
Drawing Instruments and Supplies
I. P. Loose Leaf Note Books
STUDENTS BOOKSTORE
t 75Sm-rs.m

-een Detroit, Ai nx Arbor anld Jackson.
.an on; Eastern ti'ne, one hour faster
"cal time.
it ?.rri~ted and EIxpress Cars-S:io a.
o ri . , 9:t0 p. i.
,n-a-ro in 'te!d C -rs:--8 ; 8 a. . and
tWo tnus Lt, 6:-_Is p. Ill. ; to ansing,
I Cars, Eastbound -5:3s a. mn., 6:40 a. m
n., and eery two hours to 7:05 p. M.,
1m, 9:o p. in,, to: 5o p. ml. TPo Ypsi-.
ily, 8:45 a. o. tdaily excert Sunday),
in., ra:os p, im,, 6:o5 p. mx., ix:43 p.
oa. r ," x: .,:so a. .
I Car;, Wsbon--:a .i :50 a,
1 every two hours 7 : P. t1., 10:20
12:2 x n,
e Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Orgauiked 1869
piial ............$ 300,000.00
rplu: ........... 1'.0,000.00
sources over ... .$3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
in Offiee, N. W. Corner Mai
and uron Sts.
auth Offiee, 707 North Univ-
ersity A 'eIAne.
'E AND GERMAN AMERICAN
Main & ashing'on Sts,
mieres, $2,5OO,00OO0OO
il Coke Lumber
Planing Mill Specialties
Interior Finishing
)NO. J. SAUER
2484 31N W. Liberty

We Have a
FULL LINE OF
Cut Flowers and Plants
For All Occasions
CUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 115
TfEWR ITERS
TYPEWRITING AND
SHORTHAN D
MIMEOGRAPHING
"Perything for the Typeoprier"
0,. D. M o R R L L
(ov'r 3altix're I'nch)
32a S. State St.
VAN'S 1
Quality Shoe Shop
For
4x Good Work
1114 S. Univ. Ave.
-inisn

Official newspaper at the University oE
Michigan.dPublished evey morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $.So. Want
a. stations: Quarry's, Students' Supply
Store, The Delta, cr. Packard and State.
Phones: Business 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed soo words in
aength, or notices of events will be published
in The Daily i left at the office in the Ann
Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the
west corridor of the general library, where
the notices are collected at 7:00 o'clock each
evening.
Francis F. McKinney......Managing Editor
John S. Leonard.......... Business Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester News Edito
Tn C. Reid.............Telegraph Editor
Verne Burnett............Telegraph Editor
E. P. Wright................Sports Editor
Cna. akr . ..Assignment Editor
' oradN d. Church............."City Editor
Edwin A. Hyman ...............City Editor
Lee Joslyn .............City Editor
G;ordon D. Cooke........Statistical Edtor
j dward E. Mack.......Advertising Manager
11. Kirk White.......... Publication Manager
Y. R. Athseler...... Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers................,..Accountant
C. T. Fishleigh ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
Leonard W. Nieter Earl Pardee
L. S. Thompson J. L. Stadeker
Reporters
11. A. Fitzgerald t . C. L. Jackson
'olda Ginsburg Jas Schermerhorn Jr.
Linton B. Dimond E. A. Baumgarth
Bruce Swaney E. L. Ziegler
W., R. Atlas Frank Taber
Nat Thompson H. Thompson
Phil Pack It. C. Garrison
Allen Shoenfield D. S. Rood
C. W. Neumann
Business Staff
Albert 1. Horne Roscoe Rau
E. C. Musgrave F. M. Sutter
K. S. McColl L. W. Kennedy
J. E. Campbell
TUESDAY, MARCH 21, 1916.
Night Editor.............Earl Pardee
WOMEN'S RESPONSIBILITIES
A reference made in this column to
an editorial appearing in the last is-
sue of the Gargoyle, has been, we are
afraid, misunderstood. According to
the professed reason or the Gargoyle
editor, the leader, "Michigan's Wom-
en", was written to make women think.
If that was its object it has succeeded.
But we are inclined to believe that
women need to act more than they do
to think.
That they can think has already
been demonstrated, especially in the
class room. They have learned to
act as women of the university, but
not as members of Michigan's student
body. Their pageants, circuses, plays,
athletics, and general activities show
that they take a healthy interest in
undergraduate life, very much the
same as men. But they have yet to
show a generally active interest in
general campus affairs.
Michigan is co-educational, and be-
ing such, her actions and ideals should
be controlled by this conception. The
two agencies which go farthest to-
ward guiding these actions and mould-
ing these ideals are the student pub-'
lications and the student council. The
view-point of these mediums is now
limited because it is purely mascu-
line. Deprived of the woman's view-
point they are one-sided and not truly
representative. They will only par-
tially fulfill their functions as long

as this stare of affairs exists. If there
had been women representatives on
The Daily and the council, how much
easier it would have neen to put the
new dance regulations, for which the
Judiciary Council has petitioned, into
effect.
We do not insist that women are in-
capable or that they have no place on
the campus, but rather that to secure
their place they must undertake these
responsibilities.

a

Selected Editorial

I
1

WHO CAN SPELL?
(New York Sun)
There are two English languages,
one spoken ~ and the other written.
Oral and graphic English, the vulgar
and the literary forms, are about as
much alike as cart horse, and race
horse. Linguistic history explains the
difficulty that any normal American
has in mastering the mysteries of
English orthography, but the logic of
etymological development is veiled to
th'e folks, reserved to the scholar.
For the multitude who wish to
write intelligibly, whether or not in-
telligently, the only way is the direct
and unstrategic way of the spelling
book. Spelling "reform" is as futile
as it is bewildering; and it is as hate-
ful as any other iconoclasm. Spelling
is natural to the abnormal; they need
no instruction. Those who do need
it can get it only by working step, by
painful step through the old fashioned
speller. Progress and attainment are
to be measured best in the old fash-
ioned spelling bee.
In Oakland, Cal., 12,985 children in
40 schools have been examined in
spelling. More than one-fifth of the
children spelled correctly all the
words. About one child in each ten
misspelled more than half the words.
The. girls spell better than the boys,
and the disparity between the sexes
increases as the pupils grow older.
Itnr is not surprising to learn that
children of professional men spell bet-
ter than those of laborers and that
children from homes where a foreign
language is spoken spell English
words even more miserably than those
who. come from English speaking
homes, even though we might expect
the aliens to take more pains and
achieve better results.
These are but the commonplaces of
spelling examinations. The important
thing is the light thrown upon char-
acter and vocational fitness. Boys
who expect to become farmers or
baseball players are poorer spellers
than those who anticipate entrance
into the professions. The examiners
recognize the fact that inability to
put the alphabet through its drill
may not be organically associated with
that element in the boy's composition
which determines his inclination to a
job on the diamond; but there is the
incontrovertible fact that all the boys
with major league aspirations were
"notoriously poor spellers." Yet it is
also notorious that where the colle-
giate outfielder screams "I got it,"
the professional coolly warns his
team mate away with an unimpeach-
ably grammatical "I have it."
From Oakland, through the Educa-
tional Review, we learn that the auto-
mobile repairers, aviators and hair-
dressers of the future spell better
than do the wireless operators, mail
clerks and merchants of the rising
generation; an exhibition of perver-
sity in the mundane constitution.

1TA

-...--,

I MOO
.m '

U

MANY a moun t ain o'
trouble turns c- ,e
a mole b ill after .,sre
viewed ca'mly th r' " e
haze o pipe smoke

j

Have You Seen It? A Very Great
Time Saver.
The Rust Lettering Scale
Price $1.25
UNIVERSITY $100K STORES ^

ENI N IERS!

n 7 1'

THE BEAUTY OF MY BUSINESS IS,---
FLOWE S
Visit my store and see. Everything in Flowers--Daffodils,
Orcheds, Tulips, Narcissus, Violets, Sweet Peas, Roses, Carna-
tions and Lillies of the Valley.
Ful Line olf Plants

-I

I

MRS. FLANDERS
Phone 294

Flower Shop
213 EAST LIBERIY STREET

A Conmplete LIEt of
Drug Sundries, Kodaiks
Candies Perfiries
ALBERT MANN, Druggist
2IS SaoUt M 1n' St. Ai. Arbor,, M pb.

Do youdrive an automobile in the
winter?

You should.

It's convenient.

0
sic

FOR ALL OCCASIONS
-All Student Musicians
GIVE ME A TRIAL
DOCK SCHLEEDE
340 SO. STATE STREET

A

You can heat your garage safely and .
economically with a SAFETY GAS
GARAGE HEATER.
Approved by insurance conpanies.

310-

rya.,

--

!I

1

>Pleae a customer we must first produce an article that pleases us and
eets our every expectation.
e are proud of our clothes and each garment must come up to a high
indard before I is given to the owner.

Washtenaw Gas Co.

r

e

policy makes for go; d clothes and pleased customers.

Capp r &xCapper
Furnishings .

D. E. GRENNAN
REAL CUSTOM TAILOR
606 E. LIBERTY STREET

THEI~
31Ti0

High-Grade Clothes

For, Young Men

SAk I BURCHFIELD

& CO+

ice Tailorilui

Our ready-to-wear clothes
are strictly high - grade
clothes. This means that
they are designed by artists,
tailored by hand and made
of the best cloth to be had.
The famous Hirsh-Wick-
wire clothes have won many
men by these qualities that
can only be found in clothes
that are really high-grade,
twenty to thirty dollars.

a
r
r+
t
t
l
IR W- 6

The most "thorough" of ELECTRIC CLEAN-
ERS. Well adapted for your Spring cleaning--
In your own home - Club houses - Sororities -
Fraternities. Ask for demonstration, or
visit our store-main floor.
MARTIN H A L L E R
FURNITURE-112122 E. Liberty St.--RUGS

TYP~iWRITf,.
I'l U 11t '1 E !)3 G I 6-' F'
Si3Lt -rdP4N

ne res; Fraucais lecture
A severe attack of grippe has made
it necessary for Mr. Christie ot the
French -department to postpone the
lecture which he was to give this aft-
ernoon before the members of the Cer-
en one wee' from today at 5:00 o'clock
in, the :,cture room in Tappan hall:..
Mr. Christie has also decided to
cha ge the title of his address from
tha of "Les Iles Philippines" to "Quel-
ues Types Philippins."

Those who spell least spell best. The
ancient wisdom is confirmed: if your
boy is a good speller, make a black-
smith of him; if he cannot build a
word on paper, encourage him toward
a learned profession.
McAndrew to Represent University
President Harry B. Hutchins yes-
terday announced the appointment of
William McAndrew, '86, associate su-
perintendent of schools in New York
City, as representative of the Univer-
sity of Michigan at the fiftieth anni-
versary of the founding of Peddie In-
stitute. The ceremonies will take
place at Hightstown, N. J., June 6
and 7.
WOMEN'S NEWS ON PAGE
FIVE, TOP COLUMN FOUR

Detroiter to address Menorah Sod
Samuel M. Levin, '12, has been
cured to address the Menorah soc
at its next meeting on April 2
Newberry hall. Mr. Levin, who at
present time is an instructor in Am
ican history and Political Science
the Central High school of Detroit, m
one of the founders of the Michig
chapter of the Intercollegiate Menor
association. His subject for the
dress before thessociety will be "B
jantin P. :tluda and the Confederacy
Advised to Withdraw from Scho
Reginald A. Northcott, '18, has be
advised by Dr. R. B. Canfield to wi
draw from school until next fall
account of ill health due to asthn

Cry Iixson's rew stag lunch.
i1ams St.

512

'We clothe Young Men COmplete"
WAGNER & COMPANY
STATE STREET
ESTABLISHED 1848

- -G-
yen make $<O next summer?
n 'with our propOSifl. Phone
a Schmidt, 450-J. mar2i

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