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March 21, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-21

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T BE DAILY
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Business 960
TELEGitAPH SERVICE 'M '-H
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 118.

- ----------

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 21, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ANN A'RBOR VOTEflS
CONSIDR OCT S
IN CITY'S CHRTEF

Reach Agreement ~r N
on. Tax ,Measures -UJ LI-UIfhIUL
, Committee Wants to Raise Income Tax PROPOSALS WITH
ate nd to Levy Upon
31-indloXE akersnnRS

-; ,

Liquid Fire Used
in German Attack

SEMI-OFFICIAL CONFIRMATION OF
DEFEAT AND ROUT OF VILLA BY MEN
OFOARRANIA REACHES WASHI'NCTOI

Tieltion Charges Fail to Make
Against French Positions
Along Meuse

GainI

SPECIAL ELECTION TO BE
APRIL 3 TO SETTLE
QUESTION

HELD;

MAY ADOPT COMMISSION FORM

Action Results from Four-Year
Made by Local Civic
Association

Fight

A special election for the con-
sideration of the revision of the
Ann Arbor city charter will be
held April 3. Three main points
will be decided: , whether the
charter will be revised; 2, whe-
ther this revision will alter the
present form of admhuistraton;
or 3, whether the commission
manager, council manager, or
commission form of government
will be the system used for the
city.
Commission Manager Plan Proposed
The form of government proposed
for Ann Arbor by the civic association
is that of the commission manager,
used so successfully by 74 cities of
the United States. This plan calls
for an elected body similar to the pres-
ent common council, which will elect
a manager to carry out its orders.
Such an arrangement puts the coun-
cil in absolute charge of the city's
executive.
The other plans presented in case
the revision of the charter is passed
upon by the people at the special elec-
tion of April 3, are the commission
form and a continuance, with a slight
change, of the present mayor-council
system. The former plan differs from
the one advocated by the civic associa-
tion in that the commission form has
no hired head, and each member is
responsible for one part of the city's
affairs. If the people decide that they
wish no such drastic change, the re-
vision of the 'charter will merely take
the form of rewriting the present one.
Put Council in Charge of City's Head
The advantage of the first plan is
apparent in that it enables the coun-
cil to hire or discharge a city's head
whenever the necessity arises. It is
a plan very similar to the governing
- of a school where the superintendent
is selected by the school board and
can be discharged whenever this board
deems it expedient. The council can
either be selected as it now is,- one
from each ward, or can be chosen from
candidates at large.
This election comes as a result of
a four-year fight on the part of the
civic association, which body picked a
committee in 1912 to consider the prop-
osition. One year later the city coun-
cil also appointed a committee which
worked with the first one under the
chairmanship of E. T. Mills. Their
plan was defeated by the council the
next spring. Since that defeat the
council has maintained a separate
committee known as the charter revi-
sion committee, while the civic asso-
ciation has also kept up its committee
on the commission form of govern-
ment. It is this body, with Ottmar
Eberbach as chairman, which drew up
the petitions forcing the council into
the special election.
Cooley Sees No Reason for Chfatnge
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the En-
gineering department, said yesterday
that although he did not have anything
against the commission form of gov-
ernment, he had always considered it
as a means used by some cities of
getting rid of a bad administration,
and personally he did not see where
the present Ann Arbor government
needed a change. Dean Cooley was
the first president of the Ann Arbor
council in 1892-1893, and he believes
that the -mayor-council system has
(Continued on Page Six)

Washington, Mar. 20.---Majority Lead-
er Kitchin and the other Democratic
members of the house committee on
ways and means have reached an
agreement as to the essential features
of the revenue measure to be formu-
lated as a means of financing a nation-
al defense program, and other addi-
tional expenditures to be authorized
by the present Congress.
The points regarded as settled at
this time are as follows:
$100,000,000 will be raised by in-
creasing the income tax rate.
A tax will be levied on the manufac-
ture of munitions of war, designed to
produce from twenty-five to forty mil-
lion dollars.
An additional twenty million dollars
will be raised by levies on inheritances,
increasing of internal revenue taxes
on beer and whiskey, or excises upon
selected articles from a list of 25
available objects of taxation, which
is now being studied by members of
the ways and means committee.
Scribes' Complete
Plans for Dance
Many Novelty Features to Entertain
at "All PblicatlioI
Affair'
WithrFischer's Banjorine-Saxophone
orchestra, the Michigan Concert quar-
tet, and additional specialties, the "All-
Publication Dance," to be held at
Granger's Thursday night, promises
to excell all literary achievements of
campus journalists. The occasion will
be the first complete gathering of
those interested in student publica-
tions, and it is expected that the af-
fair will become an annual event.
Tickets for the affair can be pro-
cured by applying at The Daily of-
fices, or by calling 1855.
Glaim Patria Did
Not Get Warning
Captain Desehelles and Chief Officers
(aive Evidence In Nature
of Sworn Statements
Washington, Mar. 20.-That the pas-~
senger steamer Patria was attackedt
without wurning by a German or Aus-
trian submarine off the north-eastj
coast of Tunis on March 1 is the gist
of the evidence the State department,
had today in sworn affidavits by Cap-
tain Pierre Descelles, his chief of-
ficer and others, including American
passengers. The affidavits were sent
to the State department by the Treas-
ury department late this afternoon. The
evidence was taken in New York.
Premier Has Close
Call in Viulgaria

CARRANZA WOULD COOPERATE

I INEI ii w~i3U EL.WIUJL5.u5

Diffic tlties Occasioned by Entry
American Troops May Be
Smoothed Out

SI'(~ ESI'I N 1'OR P RO#TO C OL
0 1 -A L AMMEXIC O

of

is

Washington, Mar a20.-Proposals
were, exchanged today between the
United States and the de facto govern-
ment of Mexico looking to the drawing
up of a protocol under which the
forces of both countries may pursue
Villa and his bandit followers as the
cCilinon enemy of both nations.
The original suggestion for the pro-
tocol came from the Carranza govern-
ment and was laid before Acting See-
retary of State folk today by the Car-
ranza ambassador designate here.
It represents, according to the Mexi-
can embassy, an earnest effort on the
part of Carranza to co-operate with
the United States and to avoid fric-
tion which is certain to come between
the two governments if a working
agreement of some kind is not arrived
at.
Impressed by the evidence of good
will contained in the proposals and
particularly by the activity of Mr
Arredondo as shown in seeking to
smooth out the difficulties occasioned
by the entrytof American troops into
k\]exico, Acting Secretary Polk is not
only giving the proposals serious con-
sideration but has made counter-sug-
gestions as to the terms of the pro-
tocol
THINGSARE POSSIBLE
SAYS OHIOCLRYA

Paris, Mar. 20.-Another powerful
German attack, this time between Avo-
court and Malancourt, west of the
Meuse, resulted today in heavy losses
to the Germans, according to official
cc mun ucation issued by the French
imr office tonight.
A fresh division brought up from a
i! : t:.,nt point was used in this opera-
Jon, which was characterized by the
employment of liquid fire. At one
point east of the Malancourt wood, the
Germans made slight progress.
East of the Meuse, the Germans de-
livered a small attack against the
French position at Cote de Boivre.
This assault failed, according to the
officiai reports.
SOUTHERN MEN TO SMOKE
I)ixie Club Entertains All Southerners
at Union Tonight
All men from the sunny south are
invited to attend a smoker to be held
by the Dixie Club at the Union tonight.
The purpose of the gathering will be
to foster fellowship among the south-
ern men of the university, and no ad-
mission fee will be charged.
Prof. U. B. Phillips, of the history
department, will speak, while refresh-
ments and smokes will be plentifully
supplied. The entertainment is
scheduled to start at 7:45 o'clock.
CITY COUNCIL PHRIDES
FoR LIFE SAING STATION
Complete Equipment for Use In Emer-
gency Will Be Put in Four 1
Stations
The request of the Michigan Boat
club for the establishment of an addi-
tional life saving station on the Huron
river near the ice houses was granted
by the city council at its regular meet-
ing last night. The new station will
be put into operation at once and will
supplement the one already established
farther up the river near the loM
bridge.
In addition to the two stations pro.
vided by the city, the boat club has
arranged to build two more, one near
Barton dam and the other at the club
house. All four stations will be fully
equipped with grappling hooks, ropes,
life preservers, etc., and will be con-
nected by an independent telephone
system for use in calling aid in emer-
gencies.-
Officials of the boat club announced
last evening that the Eastern Michi-
gan Edison company will commence,
work at once clearing the river above
the dam of stumps and snags. At
the present time the river and millI
race at this point is so obstructed with
roots and stumps as to constitute az
serious menace to anyone attempting
to make his way upstream in a canoe.c
The removal of the debris will also
permit a racing course to be laid out
for use in the annual spring regatta.
In order to check the force of thei
current below the dam, portions ofi
the retaining walls will be removed,
thus allowing the river to spread outI
to a greater width, and materially les-
sening the danger in navigating boats
at this point,
The work will be carried forwardt
rapidly and will be completed withinI
a short time, Anyone discoveringi
snags or rocks in the channel, or par-7
ticularly hazardous places in the cur-I
rent, are requested to report thesei
facts to the officials of the boat clubt
immediately, so the dangerous coni-c

tion may be remedied. Complete safe-t
ty for all who use the river for sport or
pleasure is the end which it is hopedt
will be attained,

*
*
*
.
*
*
:,y

El Paso, Mar. 20.-It was re-
ported here tonight through
Mexican advices that General
Pershing will go to the relief of
Madera, where the million dol-
lar lumber plant of the Madera
company has been threatened
with destruction *by the Villis-
tas.

*:

BANDIT IS BELIEVED TO HAVE
RETREATED T0W AARD
AMERICANS
NET CLOSING IN ON ALL SIDES

Rev ''.

F. Chauncey of Columbus
on "The Challenge of the
Impossible"

"A man with a real vision of faith
always before him can do anything,
however difficult," said the Rev. E. F.
Chauncey, in speaking on "The Chal-
lenge of the Impossible" in St. .An-
drew's Episcopal church last night.
"As we look back on some of the
miracles pictured in the Bible," he
continued, "we wonder how anyone can
be expected to accept them at their
face value in this age of science. How-
ever, a few years ago it would have
seemed just as impossible to talk sev-
eral thousand miles through the air
without wires; it would have seemed
just as impossible to conceive heavier
than air machines, and on through
numberless inventions of recent years
that are absolutely contradictory to
the laws of nature. It has been faith
which accomplished them all, faith
tinctured with a trust in a supreme
power above us."
According to Mr. Chauncey, a man
is limited only by his own belief in
his ability to do things.
Mr. Chauncey is rector of Trinity
church, Columbus. Ohio, and his ser-
mon Sunday evening places him in
the rank of the best preachers who
hve occupied local pulpits this year.
Fred B. Smith S. C. A. 'Speaker
Speaking last night in Hill auditor-
ium under the auspices of the S. C.
A., Fred B. Smith of New York gave
some of his impressions of a world
tour which he made several years
ago as a member of the International
committee of the Y. M. C. A. On the
trip, which was taken in company with
several other "Y" secretaries, several
thousand converts to Christianity re-
sulted from meetings held in many
of the countries of the far east.

CLUBS GIVE LST
CONCERT OFYEAR
1916 Glee and Mandolin Organization
to Make Final Appearance in
Auditorium
SIKES, '16, TO SING WAR SONG
As the final musical offering for the
season, the 1916 combined Glee and
Mandolin clubs will make their last
appearance in Hill auditorium, next
Thursday evening, March 23, at 8:00
o'clock. The program which will be
presented at that time consists for
the most part of the numbers which
will be rendered throughout the west-
em tour of the clubs during the Easter
vacation.
In preparation for the trip, it has
been the idea of Director Theodore
Harrison to develop the club with
more regard to ensemble work than
to soloists. Solo work, however, has
not been entirely disregarded, and
next Thursday's concert will find
Chase B. Sikes, '16, making what will
probably be his last appearance as a
campus entertainer before his grad-
uation in June. His number consists
of a part taken from Max Bruch's
cantata, "Cross of Fire," the entire
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin.
ity-Snow or rain, with fresh south
west winds.
TODAY
Michigan Technic out.
4:00 o'clock-Junior Civil Engineers
meet, room 248 eng. building.
4:00 o'clock-Edwin McVaugh
gives illustrated lecture on concrete
roads, room 348 eng. building.
7:30 o'clock-Dr. Victor C. Vaughan
speaks on "Clean Living," west am-
phitheater medical building.
7:30 o'clock-All-Fresh naseball
meeting, trophy room, Waterman gym.
7:45 o'clock-All southerners guests
of Dixie Club at Union. '
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-Edwin McVaugh gives
illustrated lecture on concrete roads.
room 348 eng. building.
9:00 o'clock-Fresh engineer dance,
Packard academy.
U-NOTICE
Sophomores who wish to try out for
the office of intercollege manager wil
please report at the Intramural office
in the Ann Arbor Press building,
Tuesday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock.
Eight of these men will be selected to
run for the offices at the spring elec-
tions, four being elected. All try-
outs must be eligible: that is, neither
on probation nor on warning.
Michiganensian staff picture will be
taken today at 12:30 o'clock, Randall
and Pack's.I

Moth American Forces and C arrauzi-
taps ove Northward; Co-
operation Is Apparent
. Washington, Mar, 20.-Late dis-
patches received at the war depart-
ment tonight are believed to have con-
firmed the press reports from the
border of Villa's defeat by Carranza
forces at Cruses and of his retreat in
the direction of Amnerican forces at
El 'Valle. The dispatches were ele-
phoned to Major-General Scott at his
home at Fort Meyer, but he declined
to make them public.
El Paso, Mar. 20.-If the information
of thesCarranzistas is correct today,
Villa is in a corner, his back to the
wall with troops-American and Mexi
can-closing in on all sides.
The continental divide forms the
wall and the Galena valley the field
over which the American and Mexican
troops are approaching him. Behind
the wall, with the possibilities of ap-
proaching through it, is another band
of American troops. This is accord-
ing to official information in Mexican
circles confirmed by information-
through American military sources.
Battle Raging, Says Consul
Tonight at six o'clock it was an-
nounced by Carranza Consul Garcia
that the Carranza forces at Mamiquipa
had headed Villa in his effort to break
through to the south and that a bat-
tle was raging at that hour between
the Numi-quipa garrison on one side
and Villa on the other in the yicinity
of Numiquipa at the southern end of
the Galena valley.
Nine hundred Carranzistas under
the command of Colonel Cano opened
the battle at 4:30 p. m. Villa has 300
men, the dispatch to Consul Garcia
declares. The Cano troops are from
the command of General Dutierrez, the
Carranza commander in northern
Mexico.
If the information is correct it
means that the American and Mexican-
troops are in a fair way to effect the
capture of Villa as General Pershing,
it was officially admitted today, is
moving south from Casas Grandes in
the direction of Babicora and should
be almost west of the point of battle.
Should Villa win and escape south-
west through the mountains to Babi-
cora, he would be met by the Ameri-
cans.
American Column to North
It was further confirmed today that
an American column of 1,000 men un-
der Colonel Dodd is moving in the di-
rection of El Valle which is north of
where the fighting is taking place.
Another column of American troops is
moving in the same direction behind
Colonel Dodd. If the American forces
are of sufficient strength to the south
of Villa, military officers say he is
completely. hemmed in.
Prior to Mr. Garcia's report of the
battle tonight General Gaviera, the
Juarez commander, said he was in
error yesterday in announcing that
Villa was in Babicora. It was San
Miguel de Babicora, he says, instead.
This place is almost west of El Valle.
whence Villa advanced today to the
vicinity of Numiquipa,
Movements of Carranza troops
northward continues in large numbers
and tends to bear out the claims of the
Carranzistas that they are co-operat-
ing with the American forces in the
campaign against Villa notwithstand-
ing openly expressed sentiments in
the past that there is no apparent de-
(Continued on Page Six)

Postal

Ejup! evcle .Makes (pen AtttacI6
on l !"r .>t : Shots mis.3
I' i ei" M3ark

I ondon, Mar. 2U.-Premir Rados-
layoff of uu ja was atta k(.i by a
would-be assaissin while riding an open
carriage in the -,Oets of Sofia yes-.
terday, secordi a to despatchixs from
hbth Paris . . Itome this after noon.
A postal e npio ee named lvano!'Y
fired two shots at the premier, it was
stated. The first bullet went wild.
Tie second wounded the prime min-
ister's coachman.
Before Ivanoff could fire again a
student sprang upon him and disarmed
him. The premier escaped unhurt.

L

i ._ _..

The Price
25c

m

The Time T
The Attraction

IU RSDAY

8:00.

P M.

NEW

I

HILL AUDITORIUM
SPRING CONCERT

SNAPPY
"music

I

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB

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