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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE . ICHIGAN. LDAILY

e t_.

TAILORING SERVICE
ans more than a mere fit. Every suit and overcoat
.t we produce is also made to fit the personality of
- customer, thereby becoming part of their indi-

Be measured now for your Spring suit.
starts April 7th.
G. H. WILD COMP

Vacation

ANY

FAD1NG MERCHANT TAILORS STATE ST.
Second Semester
FEXT'BOOKS
NEW and SECOND. HAND
Drawing Instruments and Supplies
I P Loose Leaf Note Books
SHEEH N'
STUDENTS BOOKSTORE
lu

Official newspaper at the University c4
Michigan. Published eve~y morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
criptions: by carrier or mail,"$2.50. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students' Supply
'Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 5oo words in
length, or notices of events will be published]
in The Daily if left at the office in the Ann
Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the1
west corridor of the general library, Where
the notices are collected at y:oo o'clock each
evening.
Francis F. McKinney......Managing Editor;
John S. Leonard..........Business Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester News Editor
Tom C. Raid........T.elegraph Editor
Verne Burnett..............elegraph Editor
E. P. Wright.................Sports Editor
j C. B. Parker.........Assignment Editor
Conrad N. Church............... City Editor
Edwin A. Hyman...............City Editor
Lee Joslyn.....................City Editor
Gordon D. Cooke..........Statistical Editor
Edward E. Mack.......Advertising Manager
H. Kirk White,......... Publication Manager
Y. R. Althseler....., Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers..... .... ...Accountant
C. T. Fishleigh ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Ediitors
Leonard W. Nieter Earl Pardee
Reporters
H. A. Fitzgerald i. L. Stadeke
W. R. Atlas 1:. TI. McDonald
E. A. Baumgarth L. S. Thompson
Bruce Swaney I . L.. Ziegler
R. J.. Blum Golda Ginsberg
Nat Thompson
Business Staff
Albert E. Horne Roscue Rau
r. C. Musgrave F. M. Sutter
K. S. McColl L. W. Kennedy
J. E. Campbell
TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1916.
Night Editor ...........Henley Hill

Selected Editorial
THE COLLEGE MAN AND THE
NEWSPAPER

FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS

New and Second-hand

(McGill Daily)
No man can complete a college
course without acquiring some ability
to assimilate information from the
printed page. This faculty he applies
in his courses, but how often does he
fail to use his developed talent beyond
the pale of the curriculum.
What a contrast there is in the aver-
age college man's method of reading
a newspaper to his method o[ attack-
ing work required in a course. 'He usu-
ally glances at the headlines on the
first page and then, unless he belongs
to that small minority who have no
athletic interest, devours the main
items on the sporting page; next he
gl'ances over the headlines in the rest
of the paper, reading in full any items
of special interest to himself, regard-
less of their real moment. What in-
formation he does take in is not like-
ly to be retained long, because of the
usual absence of effort to remember
definitely and to co-ordinate rationally
what has been read.
How many undergraduates are there
who can trace clearly and concisely,
even without going much into detail,}
the main developments in the war?
How many can talk intelligently on
European relations during the war and
produce any real facts to back up their
statements? How many have at their
tongues' end much other important and
useful information?
Familiarity with past events, prog-
ress, and philosophy, can have little
value for the man of today if his learn-
ing is wholly divorced from present-
day developments, if he does not use it
as a background for his own knowl-
edge, views and actions regarding
modern problems. With the college
man the remedy for his lack of per-
spective is not more timp, spent with
the newspaper, but the application to
his newspaper reading of the same
principles he applies to reading done
in connection with a college course-
memorizing important facts, and con-
tinual co-ordination of events.
CONTEST TO BE HELD MONDAY

TEXT

Engineers' Supplies, Laboratory Outfits, Loose
Leaf Note Books, and Fountain Pens.
VNIVERSITY BOOK STORES

BOOKS

U

ETROIT UNITED LINES
en Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
run on Eastern time, one hour faster
al time.
it Limited and Express Cars-8:10 a.
hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10 p. m.
azoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
wo hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
M.
Cars, Eastbound-5:35 a. m., 6:40 a. m.,
., and every tw hours to 7:oS p. i.,
Ti., 9:05 p. mi., b:~45 p. Tn. To Ypsi-
y, 8:48,a. m. (daily except Sunday),
m., i2:05 p. i, 6:o5 p. m., 11:15 p.
Sa. mn., 1:30 a. im.
Cars, Westbound-6-i2 a. in., 7:50 a.
~every two hours to 7:50 p. tn., 10:20
2:20 a. M.
eAnn Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869
F-al ............$ 300,000.00
plus .........$ 150,00.00
ources over ....$3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
n Office, N. W. Corner .Main
and Huron Sts.
ach Office, 707 North Univ
ersity Avenue.
E AND GERMAN AMERICAN
SAVINGS BANK
Main & Washinmton Sts.
~roes, X00,,000-
d Coke Lumber
Planing Mill Specialties
Interior Finishing
NO. J. SA UER
2464 310W. Liberty

We Have a
FULL LINE OF
Out Flowers and Plants
For All Ocoasions
COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 115

" bite" is about as poor a
recommendation for tobacco
as "no rheum natics is for a
wooden leg. But tobacco that
At bite an' yet is chuck full of
f .-hat'saEifferentstory-
~i~sVEL VET., ~f
-77 ,
,1 T

Iti

THE BEAUTY OF MY BUSINESS IS-
Visit my store and see. Everything in Flowers--Daffodils,
Orcheds, Tulips, Narcissus, Violets, Sweet Peas, Roses, Carna-
tions and Lillies of the Valley.
Full Line .of Plants

BRIDGES TO UTOPIA

man VAN'S' al
For IIion
ilMill
II(ill
1111!! Q ualty Sh e Slo
1114 . Un+11Ave
4111N Ill

Most of what we do and say dies in
a week. Thus it is with what ap-
pears in the newspapers., with what is
heard at the dinner table, and with
what we read in the college text boo.
One adjustment between this state-
ment and the continuity of the human
progress is to think that every sent-
ence we say or write is forming the
stones in a great bridge. This bridge
is slowly, advancing over vast seas
toward the hazy shores of the ideal
land to which humanity may some-
time come.
Thus when a university lets escape
into the world a corrupt lawyer, a
careless engineer or specialist, or a
journalist without ideals, the whole
fiber of spans, arches, railings, and
buttresses of the great bridge of
humanity is imperiled by inferior ma-
terial.

MRS. FLANDERS,
Phone 294

l
4
t
i
f
E

Flower Shop
213 EAST LIBERTY STREET

FOR ALL OCCASIONS
= A11 Student Musicians
G I E ME A TRIAL
DOCK SCHLEEDE
340 SO. STATE STREET

s1o-M

f
....
....

~ .

I

"1

o Please a customer we must first produce an article that pleases-us and
Beets our every expectation.
Ve are proud of our clothes and each garment must come up to a high
andard before it is given to the owner.
his policy makes for good clothes and pleased customers.

(app-r & Capper
Furnishings

D. E. GRENNAN
REAL CUSTOM TAILOR
406 E. LIBERTY STREET

. ..
.. .

.........

Graduates of colleges are among the'
two per cent which leads the opinion
and holds the power of most civilized
countries. Thus the college man be-
comes the bridge builder. He has the
responsibility of a safe crossing for
all mankind for all time.
ADAMS HOUSE SECURES PRIZE
Sophomore Class Awarded Loving Cup
at Fanicy Dress Party
A representation of a submarine
followed by a flotilla of torpedoes
bearing the legend "safety first,"
staged by the Adams house won first
prize at the Fancy Dress Party held
by the Women's league Saturday eve-
ning in Barbour gymnasium.
A clever vaudeville and calis-
thenic .performance by the sophomore
class secured the loving cup awarded
in the class contests. Harriet Glass
and Beulah Smith, as the Gold Dust
Twins, were voted the prize for the
cleverest costumes, while Emily Sar-
geant and Joy Irwin, as Mr. and Mrs.
Cook, were declared funniest. Helen
B. Dow and Ruth MacLachlan were
awarded the prize for the prettiest
costumes.
In the group contests, the Athletic
department with a travesty on Ford's
peace expedition staged the funniest
act, and Newberry Residence as a
pack of cards with a clown for Joker
won the beauty prize.
Fischer to Play at Union, March 24
Fischer's six-piece orchestra of Kal-
amazoo will play at a Spring dancing
party to be held at the Michigan Union
on March 24. Tickets for the affair
are 2.00, and may be had by calling
236 or 2370.
Poetry Club Renews Its Activities
The Poetry club will resume its
meetings at 7:30 o'clock on Wed-
nesday evening at 518 Monroe street.
The works of Anna Hemstead Branch
will be studied. The reader for this

Proibit ion Orators to Debate foil
Representative at Ypsilanti
The annual prohibition oratorical
contest will be held next Monday night,
March 20, in University Hall. The
winner of this contest will represent
the university at the state prohibition
meet to be held at the State Normal
College in Ypsilanti next month.
The prohibition contests were re-
vived only a few years ago after hav-
ing been discontinued for some time.
As a consequence they are only now
regaining some measure of the former
popularity which they had among stu-
dents in the oratory department. This
year, especially, there has been in-
creased interest in the work, and it is
thought that Michigan will make a
much better showing than ever before.
All contestants must have their ora-
tions in the hands of the committee not
later than Saturday, March 18.
HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL NOW
CROWDED WITH PATIENTS
The Homeopathic hospital is so
crowded that a large number of ap-
plicants cannot be accommodated.
There are now 126 patients confined
in the hospital, the largest number
since the establishment. There is
also a large waiting list rfady for the
first empty cots.

Do you drive
winter?

Washtenaw Gas Co.

9' 3 .=}.= Krrr .

I.

Women's Organizations

You should. It's convenient.
You can heat your garage safely and
economically with a SAFETY GAS
GARAGE HEATER.
Approved by insurance companies.

A Complete Line of
Drug Sundries, Kodaka
Candies, Perfuimes
ALBEKT MANN, Druggist
215 Sonxth Mmin St. Ann Arbor. Mich.'

~

an automobile in the

0

SAM BURCHFIELD &

Co+

Fine Tailoring

Teachers of Commerclal
Sublcts prepared at
Hamilton usIness College
State anEWiiama S . t.
Thether you waat to take a trai
make a .all, we will get you there
mne. Or servIse is Just as
apt in ba weather as e pleasant
Ps. Starr Texieab Co.. phone W 55.

ASK FOR and GET
HORLICK'S'
THE ORIGINAL
MIALTED MILK
Cheap substitutes cost YOU same price.
Try Hixson's new stag lunch. 512
Williams St.
Send the Daily home. $1.00 for the

Act 1 of the Junior Girl's Play will
rehearse at 3:00 o'clock this after-
noon; Act 2 at the same hour on Wed-
nesday.
Any one desiring to order in ad-
vance a score of the Junior Girl's Play
should sign the slip in the Women's
League room at once. If 250 orders
are taken, the score will be 75 cents,
otherwise it will be*$1.00.
Dean Jordan and Mrs. Effinger will
L:e at home to college girls on Tuesdays
for the remainder of March.
Any one wishing to take part in the
Shakespearean Pageant should see
Professor Kenyon. He will be in his
office, Room 23, Old Engineering build-
ing, March 14, 15, 16, from 2:00 to 4:00
o'clock.
Stylus will meet this evening at 7:30,
with Grace Boynton, 547 Elm street.
Professor F. N. Scott'will speak.
There will be 'a meeting of Masques
this evening at 7:30, at Sorosis House.
Wyvern will entertain the new
Junion women this evening at an in-
formal dance at Newberry Residence.

OR1 I61.FROST.TELLS OF
KENTUCKY MOUNTAINEERS
soutlieriier Says Dwellers ill Region
Are not "White Trash" But
Iciturnlt of Pioneers
"Our Contemporary Ancestors" was
the subject of an address delivered in
the Presbyterian church last Sunday
evening by President William Goodell
Frost of Berea College, Kentucky. The
address dealt with the life, the hopes,
the aspirations, and the trials and
sorrows of the dwellers in the moun-
tains of Kentucky.
President Frost tried to show that
these people were not the "poor white
trash" of -the South who had -been im-
poverished through loss of their slaves
and plantiations, but that they were
the lineal descendants of those pion-
eers who formed the vanguard of our
civilization. Westward they had turn-
ed their course until, meeting the
formidable barriers of the Appalachian
chain, their progress was checked,
and here they were forced to settle.
He pointfd out that in the struggle
to wrest a living from the barren and
waste places these pioneers, original-
ly well educated themselves, were un-
able to devote the time to the educa-
tion of their children, with the result
that each succeeding generation be-
came .Tore ignorant and lawless than
the preceeding.
"Neither the mountainous countries

of Scotland nor Switzerland are as
cut off from civilization as these
regions of which I speak,'" said Presi-
dent Frost. "They have their sys-
tems of natural lakes and waterways
by which transportation is effected,
but here one may ride for miles
through rugged and almost impene-
trable land without seeing more than
a rude cabin or a' badly .tilled corn-
field on some precipitous slope."
The speaker attested to the capacity
of these men and women, and quoted
Abraham Lincoln as an exanple. He
stated that religion and education are
eagerly welcomed by them, and out-
lined at some length the work of
Berea College along these lines. "Un-
less eve grasp this opportunity at
once," he asserted, "it will be too late.
Population has increased. and the
means of subsistence have not. Un-
less their condition is attended to,
it must steadily grow worse."
Ruedaun Accepts Position in West
R. H. Ruedann, '15, has accepted a
position as forest guard in the Coco-
nino National Forest in Arizona. Mr.
Ruedann was editor of the Michigan
Forester last year.
SQMMER JOBs. M IlC0 brushes
kept several prominent campus men
in college. $500 was saved by- ,
'18; $600 by - --, '16L; $500 by
'16; $700 by ---, 16L, last
summer. Experience unnecessary.
Telephone Joseph Cotton, '16, 373-W;
Jesse Simpson, '18, 2180-M; Carl Yeis-
ley, lit, 2494.

a goad flashlight. rest of the year.

** occasion will be A. D. Conkey, '16.

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