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October 14, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-14

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;NE lyS OF HE WOLD ANDj

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Phones:-Editorial 2414
BTsIGsS 960
TFL~iWVHSERVICE BY TIHE
\ EW YORK S UN

Vol. XXVI.. No. 9.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

_
t t

MVARIETTA SCORES
AGAINST VARSITY
ALTHOUGH BEATEN
ERl'ECTIVyE BASKETBALL TACTICS
ACCOUNT FORI VlStTORS
POINTS
ROEIM DOES STELLAR PILOTING
(aptain Sutton Stars for Ohio Team
l1eister, Fullback, Susteins
Broken ArmI

" . IAIENLEY DELIVERS
ADDRESS AT SECOND
LtWIBRRINGATHERING

WILSONFOR ARMY
RE-ORGANIZATION
Preside-t to Back arrison's Scheme,
According to Washington
Official

LINCOLN OFSOUTH
TO SPEAK( SUNDAY
Presidet of Berea College and Bene-
factor of Mountaineers to Tell
Experiences

i

Marietta registered the first score of I

the season against the Wolverines in
yesterday's game. But while the Ohio-
ans were counting six points against
Coach Yost's men, the Michigan
eleven scored'28 against the follow-
ers of Captain Sutton.
In view of the problem that Coach
Yost is facing in selecting a quarter-
back, it is a significant fact that the
Michigan team marked all its scores
on the Marietta eleven while "Rum-
my" Roehm was piloting. In the final
quarter, after Marieta had scored,
Roehm replaced Zeiger, and while the
stands were crying for a touchdown
he drove the team for the final score.
It was a pinch, fourth down on the
Marietta two-yard line, and Maul-
betsch, of course, was the man to do
the scoring.
Marietta played an open game, her
forward passing keeping Michigan on
the alert. Michigan's defense against
Marietta's passes seemed to be almost
a negligible quantity. Sutton to Mc-
Intyre and Ilayes to Sutton were
formulae which rarely failed to ad-
vance the ball for the visitors. Inci-
dentally, Sutton proved to be a star.
1'; always had some part in the for-
ward passes, and on defense he
mussed up the Michigan interference
in a most embarrassing manner.
Meister did some good work at full
for Marietta, but had to retire in the
third quarter, being driven to the field
house with what may prove, on X-ray
examination, to be a broken arm.
Meister's injury was the only serious
mishap of the game. In the second
quarter Smith veceived a blow which
did for him for thli day, but he walked
off the field, and is in shape for a
scrimmage today.
Michigan registered her first seven
points at the end of three minutes of
play, Smith scoring a touchdown after
the ball had been rushed down the
field by successive line plays. Ben-
ton kicked goal. Michigan followed
this with another reversion to straight
football, but Smith broke away from
the conventional'and ran 38 yards for
the second score. .Benton goaled
again, and the quarter closed with
the' scor 14 to 0 in Michigan's favor.
Marietta started her passing tactics
in the second stanza, one from Hayes
to Meister placing the ball on Mich-
igan's 10-yard line. Michigan recov-
ered the ball when it was passed b-
hind the goal line, and saved a pos-
sible score at this juncture. A min-
ute later "Maullie" ran 32 yards with
the ball, and was downed on Mari-
etta's 30-yard line. A forward pass,
Roehm to Ingham, scored the third
touchdown. Cochran goaled.
Catlett went in for Benton, and
after tearing off some-of-his Ernsa-
tional stuff, punted. Marietta started
a forward pass drive down the field
which was- only stopped by the call-
ing of time. They resumed the tac-
tics at the beginning of the third quar-
ter. Sutton passed 45 yards to Mc-
Intyre, and on the same formation
passed 25 yards to Richardson, who
was tackled on the Michigan goal
line. The ball was over far enough
to count. Hayes failed to kick goal.
Michigan's last score canp when
Roehm forward passed 25 yards to
Ingham, putting Michigan on Mariet-
ta's 10-yard line and within striking
distance. The fourth down found the
ball on the two-yard line, and Maul-
betsch carried it across.
Michigan's substitute tackle, Ing-
ham, proved to be a'capable end. He

was down fast under the punts, and
gathered in two forward passes which
(Continued on Page Three)

Visiors to Si Sp3d Morning Attending
Li versity Classes of Special
lutcrest to Them
PRO(RAM OF BRIEF SPEECHES
PREPARED FOR NEXT MEETING
MR. C. MOORE, OF HISTORICAL
COMMISSION, WILL GIVE
LECTURE TONIGHT
"From one point of view the library
is a cemetery where dead books are
buried," said Prof. R. M. Wendy ip
his lecture before the State Library
association in Alumni Memorial hall
last night. "The vast majority of
printed books are non-significant,"
continued Professor Wenley. He
spoke interestingly on the types of
p;ople who frequent libraries, the
types of libraries themselves, and the
service that the library can render to
it^ patrons.
The lecture was attended by a large
number of ,,legates who had arrived
for the opening of the convention in
the afternoon.
This morning will be given up to
-visiting university classes under the
direction of guides furnished by the
university library. The convention,
guests will be free to choose classes
of especial interest to them from a
prepared list obtainable at the regis-
tration desk in Alumni Memorial hall
or at the university library.
At this afternoon's session scheduled
for 1:30 o'clock the convention topic
will be staff efficiency and esprit de
corps. Brief addresses will be made
by Miss Katharyne Sleneau of Port
Huron, Miss Mary Myler of -Detroit,
Miss May E. Dow of Saginaw, Miss
Anne V. Taggart of Grand Rapids,
Miss Olive C. Lathrop of Lansing, Miss
I. L. Eckert of St. Joseph, Miss Al-
mena R. DePuy of Jackson, Miss Eliz-
abeth Pomroy of Armada, and Miss
Fanny D. Ball o 'rand Rapids.
Faculty members of the school of
music will give a complimentary con-j
cert in honor of 4he visiting delegatest
in Hill auditoriu:n at 4:15 o'clock thisr
afternoon. At 6:30 o'clock the visit-
ing delegates will be the guests off
tlio ln Arbor Library club for sup-
. ack's tea room.
Closmig le day's program will come
one of the most heralded addresses
of the convention at 8:00 o'clock this{
evening in Alumni Memorial' hall,
when Mr. Charles Moore, secretary of
the state historical commission, willt
speak on the subject, "Michigan Wor-
thies Worth Knowing." Mr. Moore is
secretary of the Fine Arts commis-
sion of I'troit and a member of the
National Fine Arts commission re-t
sponsible for passing on all plans forl
public buildings in the City of Wash-1
ington.,

DANIELS

WILL EXPAND

Washington, Oct. 13.--President
Wilson has endorsed Secretary of
War Garrison's $200,000,000 army re-
organization propaganda, according to
astatement made by a high official
tod ay.The plan was submitted about
P. month ago.
In endorsing Garrison, the president
will have to take a decisive stand
against certain members of congress
who are opposed to the secretary's
program for the army.
The president will confer with Rep-
resentative Hay tomorrow to enlist his
support for the measure, and there is
considerable speculation as to the re-
sult of the interview.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels an-
nounced that no definite program of
ships and money to be asked of con-
gress for next year has been made.
The secretary advocates a plan where-
by the navy will expanded through a
series of flive years. By 1922, he says,
the navy expects to have 17 battle-
ships of the first line and 13 in the
second line of defense.
BOARD OF REGENTS TO CONVENE
FOR FIRST MEETING OF YEAR
Regents of the university will hold
their first regular meeting of the col-
lege year at 10:00 o'clock tomorrow
morning in the regents' room of the
law building. No indication has yet
been given as to what matters will
come up for the consideration of the
board.
DEAN VAUGHAN WILL ACT AS
EDITOR FOR NEW PUBLICATION
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the Med-
ical school, has been appointed editor-
in-chief of the Journal of Laboratory
and Clinical Medicine, a new publica-
tion wvhich has as its purpose the fur-
thering of better laboratory and clin-
ical methods among the practicing
physicians and surgeons throughout
the country. .
The editorial staff consists of such
well-known men as Dr. Hans Zinsser,
of Columbia university; Dr. Paul G.
Woolley and Dr. Roger S. Morris, both
of the University of Cincinnati; Dr.
Dennis E. Jackson, of Washington
university; Dr. Frederick P. Gay, of
the University of California; Dr. J. J.
R. MacLeod, of Western Reserve uni-
versity, and Dr. Roy G. Pearce, of the
University of Illinois.
The Journal will be published
monthly by C. V. Mosby & Co., of St.
Louis. The first issue has already ap-
peared under date of October 1.
'16 ENGINEERS PICK NOMINEES
Warner and Phillips Selected to Run
for President
Senior engineers fired their first
guns for an activ year when they
nominated class officers last night.
The following are nominees for the
different offices: President, H. H. Phil-
lips and H. D. Warner; vice-president,
J. B. Breymann and F. J. Vonachen;
treasurer, A. H. Keeler and R. A.
Dodge; secretary, T. C. Trelfa and M.
S. Reed; basketball manager, C. 'P.
Harris and H. Manwaring; track man-
ager. J. K. Norton and W. W. Kurtz;
baseball manager, W. P. Wickham and
R. A. Hall; oratorical dlegate, L. E.
Hughes and K. W. Heinrich. E. C.
Headman was unanimously elected
football manager.
The class election will be held from
1:00 o'clock to 3:00 o'clock on Friday,
in room 348 of the engineering build-
ing.

Will Lay Keel for New Dreadnaught
New York, Oct. 13.-The keel of the
first electrically-propelled battleship,
the California, will be laid tomorrow,
with Admiral R. S. Griffin, of the
United States navy, in charge of the
ceremony. The battleship is expected
to make 21 knots an hour. fier two
sister ships, the battleships Idaho and
Mississippi, which are not propelled by
electricity, will be completed in 1917.

Dr. WilIiam Goodell Frost. the "Abe
Lincoln of the South," who speaks at
7:45 o'clock Sunday evening in the
Presbyterian church, is known
throughout the south not only as a
brilliant educator and lecturer but
also as a social regenerator.
Ever since he became president of
Berea college in 1892, Dr. Frost has
made a distinctive work of adopting
modern educational methods to the
conditions in the southern mountains.
There are 1,700 students enrolled in
Berea college, mostly poor whites.
These people are the feud-wagers of
the mountains, the most uncivilized
and unrestrained men in the south.
Dr. Frost's work among them has
caused an almost unbelievable trans-
formation. The influence of Berea
college extends over five states and
thousands of people.
Dr. Frost was educated at Wooster,
Harvard and Oberlin, and, has traveled
extensively in Europe, spending some
time at the University of Gottingen,
Germany, and other foreign schools.
USE OF NEW ANTHRAX SERUM
RESTS ON STACKPOI2E CASE1
New York, Oct. 13.-A verdict on
the efficiency of the new anthrax se-
rum will be pronounced within the
next few days. G. F. Stackpole, the
Riverhead lawyer, is passing through
the crisis of the infection at the Belle-
vue hospital, and his life hangs in the
balance. One crisis, that of death by1
strangulation, has already been
passed, and it now remains for the
patient to eliminate the toxins of thec
anthrax bacilli. Stackpole is greatlyt
handicapped in this by his heart,
which has been weakened as a result,
of his struggle for life.
UENGINEERS RUST BE
CULTURED IN FUTURE"

NAVY WORKS

AMONG FEUD-WAGERS

STUDENTS TO HAE
SHARE IN UNION'S
NATIONAL ANVASS
Uindergraduates Will be AskeI to Sen
PostAls to Aluni , Urging
Support of Plan
EST3IATE OF 11',I1, AT END
OF WEEK PfACED AT $500,000
ALUMNI LISTS AVAILABLE AT
UNION AND MEMORIAL
With the f:niadion o a plan for
the undergraduate body of the uni-
versity sending postals to the alumni
in regard to the new Union clubhouse
comes the first opportunity for the
student body to aid in the national
campaign for funds. The postals will
be distributed at the Union to any
student applying.
The scheme is to have every stu-
dent send postals to the alumni in
his home city, telling them of the
need for a new clubhouse, the spirit
of co-operation on the part of the
undergraduate body, and urging sup-
port in a material way. The task of
sending out a few postals is slight
and the-anticipated result would spem
to warrant every member of the stu-
dent body sending cards to his friends.
Last night's official report showed
a total of $229,836.00 subscribed for
the new building. This includes only
the subscriptions since October 1
which have been reported. Many com-
nitteemen have postponed reporting
their work until the second official
announcement, which will be made
Friday or Saturday of this week. Con-
servative estimates place the total at
the end of this week above the $500,-
000.00 mark.
There is little chance for the stu-
dent body to take active part in the
campaign which will mean much for
the university and life on the campus,
so hearty co-operation with the pres-
ent plan is urged, Alumni lists ars
obtainable both at Alumni Memorial
liall and at the Union. As the cam-
paign will close October 31, prompt
action in sending out the cards is re-
quested.
Announce Committee for Union Dance
harry Kerr, '16, will be the chair-
man, and Edison C. Smith, '16E, and
Richard M. McKean, '16, will com-
pose the remainder of the committee
for the second Union piembership
dance of the year to be held Saturday
night at the club house. Dr. Jonathan
F. Scott and Mrs. Scott will be the
chaperons. Tickets will go on sale
at the Union desk at 5:00 o'clock this
afternoon. Last week the limit of 100
tickets was sold out before Saturday
noon.
McADOO OUTLINES PLANS FOR
NEW U. S. MERCHANT MARINE
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 13 .-Secre-
tary McAdoo outlined before the busi-
ness men of the city today the new
plan for shipping legislation, in which
he expects to be supported by Presi-
dent Wilson. The plan is along the
lines of the government ownership
plan as it was submitted to congress
last year and rejected.
McAdoo says that congress will be
asked to appropriate $50,000,000 in-
stead of the $40,000,000 given last year.

He proposes that the government
build its own ships, and recommends
that the fleet be operated between this
country and Central and South Amer-
ica, as well as the Orient, as an aux-
iliary to the navy.
DIGEST GAINS 526 ANSWERS
TO WOMAN SUFFRAGE QUESTION
New York, Oct. 13.-The Literary
Digest magazine today completed its
attempt to gain an idea of the national
attitude toward woman suffrage. Sev-
eral hundred letters have been sent
broadcast throughout the country to
individuals. Of these, 526 have
brought answers, replies coming from
all of the states of the Union.
No results of the canvass have been
given out yet, but it is expected that
the results will be made known in the
near future.W

|'

Dean M. E. Cooley Tells
They Should le More
Here Specialists
Successful engineers in
must be more than mere

ZEPPELINS RAID
LONDON, KILLING
EIGHT1 34 HRT
A11l ~I lPS CAUSE LITTLE I)AMAGE
TO PROPERTY; CEN SORS GIVE
$lJWIT. INFORMATION

FRENCH LOSE SOME GROL

Freshmen
Tan
the future
specialists

British U-Boat Sinks Teuton Ve el;
Sultan Promises No More Ar-
meniani Massacres
London, Oct. 13.-For the second
time within five weeks, German Zep-
pulins made an air raid upon the heart
of London tonight, killing eight per-
sons and wounding 34 others.
Although there was little material
damage reported, authorities are in-
clined to believe that the raid was the
most disastrous the metropolis has
suffered so far. The airships attacked
the district in which the principal
hotels and theaters are located at a
time when the streets were crowded,
thus greatly increasing the number of
casualties. No government buildings
are believed to have been damaged.
As usual, the censorship was imme-
diately tightened, with the result that
complete information regarding the
latest feat of Germany's aerial fleet
is unavailable.
Paris (via Amsterdam), Oct. 13.--
The French have been dislodged from
a number of their trenches at Souchez
by strong forces of German infantry,
according to a Reuter's dispatch. At
all other points the Teutons were re-
pulsed. Terrific artillery fire from
the German guns payed the way for
the assault upon the French lines.
Heavy fighting is still continuing in
the Vosges, according to the report,
while artillery duels are raging on
the remainder of the front. The
French are making a determined ef-
fort to repulse the German attacks by
using guns of the largest caliber.
London, Oct. 13.--Asserting that the
British losses for the past week alone
were 30,000 men, Major-general Fran-
cis Ward made an urgent plea for
-more enlistments here today. He fa-
vors the enlistment plan of Winston
Churchill and said that Lord Kitch-
ener is more in favor of this plan
than he was a month ago.
In view of the serious situation con-
fronting the allies in the Bakans,
British recruiting officers are making
every effort to enlist more men for
Great Britain's army and naval forces.
Copenhagen, Oct. 13.-The German
steamer Walter Lowenhardt was sunk
today in the Baltic sea by a British
submarine. The crew of the steamer
was taken off in small boats.
Rome, Oct. 13.-Austrians found
with Italian uniforms on their per-
sons will be shot immediately, accord-
ing to an official announcement here
today.
Rome, Oct. 13.-No more massacres
of Armenians will take place. Official
announcement was made that the Sul-
tan of Turkey has promised the Pope
that no more outrages of this sort
will occur.
New York State Club Changes Name
The organization heretofore known
as the New' York State club, begs to
announce to the campus that it will
hencforth be the Akhenaton Society.
Its home is located at 517 East Ann
street.
VOiclsack holds First Meeting Tonight
Woolsack, junior law honorary so-
ciety, will hold its first meeting of
the year tonight in the practice court
room of the law building. Officers will
be elected and work will be outlined
for the coming school year.

Fre.knan Recovering from Operation
F. B. Tobey, '11E, who was operated
on Montday evening for acute appen-
dicitis, is recovering rapidly at the
Homeopathic hospital. He will prob-
ably be released from confinement in
about ten days.

I I

WHAT'S GOING ON

-I

! I

TODIAY
Northwestern club meets, Michigan
Union, 7:00 o'clock.
Comedy Club tryouts, Cercle Francais
rooms, 4:00 o'clock.
Soph mass meeting, west physics lec-
ture room, 7:00 o'clock.
University Symphony tryouts, School
of Music, 7:00 o'clock.
Greek and Latin students' reception,
Memorial hall, 8:00 o'clock. .
Faculty concert, Hill auditorium, 4:15
o'clock.
"Electro-magnets," C. R. Underhill,
348 Eng., 7:30 o'clock.
Doutscher Verein meets in Verein
rooms, 8:00 o'clock.
Tickets for Warthin Sex lectures, Y.
M. C. A., 2:00-6:00 o'clock (for first
year men only).
TOMORROW
Meeting of the Regents, 10:00 o'clock.
Convocation for 1915, Hill auditorium,
3:00 o'clock.I
Freshman night, Newberry hall, 6:00
o'clock.
Engineers as of class of 1915 smoker,
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Glee club tryouts, School of Music.,
7:00 o'clock.
Tickets for Warthin Sex lectures, Y.
M. C. A., 2:00-6:00 o'clock.

in technical lines, according to a state-
ment made by Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, of the engineering college,
yesterday morning at the first weekly
freshman engineering assembly of the
year.
"The ranks of the engineering pro-
fession are becoming crowded," said
the dean, "so that ambitious engineers
should be sufficiently cultured to take
that place in a community to which
their engineering training entitles
them.
"When I first came to the university
nearly 35 years ago," he went on, "en-
gineering was but one of the curriculi
of the literary department, so that the
student of engineering was able to
spend a large portion of his time in
getting a general education. Since
that time the expansion of what was
then simply civil engineering into the
various branches has resulted largely
in the exclusion of arts and letters
from the studies of the enigineer.
"Learn how to write and speak the
'queen's English' at least," was the
closing advice of the dean to the first
year stujnts. "And don't try to spe-
cialize too much while in college.
You'll have 40 years in after life in
which to do all of your specialization."
During the assembly the 1919 engi-
neers made nominations for the offices
of president, vice-president, secretary
and treasurer of the class. The list of
nominees is as follows: President, S.
C. Smith and D. P. Wood; vice-presi-
dent, R. L. Biggers, B. Miller, Cedric
Smith and E. A. Stevens; secretary,
H. A. Barton, D. Bovee, G. Hodges and
C. T. Van Dusen; treasurer, W. W.
Gubbins, A. D. Lewis, C. B. Miranda
and T. D. Osborn. The election will
take place at the weekly assembly of
the class next Wednesday morning.

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