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February 20, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-20

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NEWS OF THE WORLD
THE CAMPUS

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VOL. XXVI. No. 93.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRITARY 20, 1916.

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OPERA COSTUMES
WILL SURPASSANY
OF PREVIUS YEARS

EAVES COSTUME COMPANY
NEW YORK TO FURNISlH
ALL COSTUMES

OF j

CHICAGO ALUMNI MAKE PLANS
Tryouts for Orchestra to -e Held
This Afternoon; To Coo on
Each Trip
According to present plans the cos-
tumes and scenery of "Tres Rouge,"'
the 1916 Union opera, will surpass"
that of any previous Union production.
The contract for the costumes was
given to the Eaves Costume company
of New York city, known as one of1
the best along that line. A total of
104 costumes will be ordered tomor-
row morning, showing the Vlaborate-
ness and variety of costumes to be
used
Director Morgan has carefully
planned for the costumes of each cast
and chorus member, and stated yes-
terday, "We aregoing to haveexcel
lent costumes according to present;.'
plans; in fact, they can hardly be
beaten."
No complete list has been officially
given out as regards the trips to be
made. The trip to Chicago and De-
troit are .practicaly settled however,
and dates for the engagements at
grand Rapids and Toledo are yet to
be made. The trips this year will not"
be made iin a single week, as hereto-
fore. The committees in charge plan
to make two cities each week-end be-
fcre the spring recess begins.
Unusual enthusiasm is already being
shown by the Chicago alumni, and
mammoth preparations are being made
for the annual show and banquet.
Maurice Toulme, '12, who has charge.
of the publicity end of the alumni as-
sociation, is making arrangements for
an opera addition to their regular
Alumni bulletin, which will be pub-
lished about March 1. The bulletin
will be devoted almost exclusively to
the Union opera. Last year the pro-
duction in Chicago was a big success,
and it is certain, According to pres-
ent enthusiasm, that the 1700 alumni
will give the 1916 show a still larger
audience.
Tryouts for all those wishing to
take part in theUnion opera orchestra
will be held at the Union at 2:30
(Continued on Page Six)
HALL'S TALK AT UNION
WILL START CAMPAIGN
First Effort Towards Securing Funds
for Ambulance Relief Work to
Be Made Today
The movement on the Michigan cam-
pus to send ambulances to the Euro-
pean battle front, thus following the
good example set by the eastern uni-
versities, will get its start this after-
noon when Louis P. Hall, Jr., who
drove one of the Dartmouth college
ambulances for several months, will
talk on the American ambulance work
in France. Hall will illustrate his
talk with stereopticon slides showing
various phases of this relief work.
The meeting will be held at the
Union at 4: 00 o'clock, and will be in
charge of President Harry B. Hutchins,
who will introduce the speaker. F01-
lowing the talk, there will be an in-
formal discussion and from those men
who show the greatest interest in the
proposition will be picked the man
who will take charge of the Michigan
campaign. Hall himself does not want
to take this active control but wishes
to turn the matter over to a university
man with whom he will work as ad-
visor.

Will Shopv Novel
Newspaper Film
To Present Mysteries of Chicago
rilbunes Big Moern
Plant
Have you ever wondered just how a
great newspaper is produced? How
the reporter covers his assignment and
gets the-iiews, and how itis prepared
for the millions of readers of a'great
metropolitan daily?
These and other problems in the
intricate production of a daily news-
paper will be shown at 7:30 o'clock
tomorrow night in the Natural Science
building lecture room, in a motion pic-
ture production, "Racing the Dead-
line." The film is a two-reel story,
unraveling the mysteries of the Chi-
cago Tribune plant and is being pre-
sented under the auspices of Sigma
Delta Chi, national honorary journal-
istic fraternity. While the film is par-
ticularly of interest to students in
journalism, the performance is open
to the general public and no admis-
sion will be charged.
7licliigan To Get
Noted Astronomer:
Dr. Henroteau of Brussels Leaves Bel-
ginan to Carry on Work
Dr. Henrotean, a noted Belgian as-
tronomer, is expected to arrive in
Ann Arbor in a few days to take a po-
sition on the observatory faculty
staff. Before the outbreak of the war
he was connected with the observa-
tory at Brussels but, like many other
scientists, was forced to leave the home
country in order to carry on his scien-
tific work. Another astronomer from
the same country has been secured
by the Xerxes observatory.
The salary of Dr. Henroteau has'
been provided for by Mr. R. P. La-
mont of Chicago. The dono: was a
member of the engineering class of
91 and is now president of the Ameri-
can Steel Foundries Co. in Chicago.
MAY RAVE ALL-CAMPUS DANCE
Fresh Lits to Meet and Decide Final
Arrangements
The fresh lits will hold a dance on
March 4 in Barbour gymnasium. A
meeting of the social committee will
be held next week for making the final
arrangentents for the party, and at
that time it will be decided whether
or not the dance will be open to the
campus at large. Much enthusiasm
was displayed over the party at the
last assembly, so the committee is
hopeful for a large and successful
party.
NOTED EDITOR VISITS CITY
Ellery Sedgwick, of Atlantic Monthly,
Stops in Ann Arbor
Ellery Sedgwick, editor of the At-
lantic Monthly, spent a few hours in
Ann Arbor yesterday visiting friends.
Mr. Sedgwick left early in the after-
noon for Toledo where he will visit
Mr. Gustave Ohlinger, a lawyer of that
city, who spent several years in the
Orient, and who has written about
the politics of the east for the Atlantic.

ITINERARY GIVEN
DUT FOR WESTERN
JOURNEY OFCLUBS
'ENT ATIVE PA NS IN(Li I)E STOPS
IN STrATES ( WASIIIN(#TON,
1YNIT AN AN DO1Ei(QN
ALUMNI GIVE FINANCIAL HELP
Selection of Men to Make Trip to
Pe Made After Ann
Arbor Concert
David R. Ballentine, '16, manager of
the combined Glee and Mandolin clubs,
announced yesterday that plans were
nearly complete for the western trip
which will carry the "Yellow and
Bine" to thrill the hearts of thousands
of western alumni and Michigan sup-
porters during the spring recess.
The tentative schedule as now plan-
ned includes Minneapolis, Minn., Great
Falls and Helena, Montana, Seattle,
Spokane and Tacoma, Washington,
and Portland, Oregon. It is possible
that Aberdeen, Washington, and Lew-
istown, Montana, will be placed on the
itinerary, as soon as the management
hears from the men in charge at those
points. It has not been decided wheth-
er the joint concert with the glee club
of the University of Minnesota at
Minneapolis will be held on the way
out or on the return trip, but this will
probably be definitely decided this
week.
The work of Manager Blallentine has
been greatly relieved by the work of
many loyal alumni in the concert cities
who have taken the responsibility of
liberal financial guarantees, in order
to insure the success of this year's
trip.
The selection of the men to make
the trip has not taken place and it
is possible that it will be deferred
until financial results of the concert
of March 23, which will be held in
Hill auditorium, are made known. Def-
inite dates for the start will be de-
cided upon at that time although it
is hardly possible that the trip will
begin before the first day of the Eas-
ter vacation.
L.A GARDE SCORES AMERICANS
(tmplains of Lack of Interest in Yii-
tary Methods in U. S.
Lack of interest in military methods
in the United States was scored by
Col. Louis LaGarde, in the first lecture
of the series which h'e is delivering
here, Friday afternoon.
Colonel LaGarde gave a history of
gunmaking, showed examples of bul-
lets, and told of the various tests to
which the government subjects new
ammunition. Dean Victor C. Vaughan
introduced Colonel LaGarde as "the
greatest authority anywhere on the
wounds of war." Colonel LaGarde
gave the second lecture of the cpurse
yesterday morning,. He will lecture in
the amphitheatre of the medical build-
ing at 11:00 and 4:00 o'clock to-
morrow, besiues speaking at the
Founders' Day exercises Tuesday eve-
ning.

at the Union church services in Hill
auditorium this evening at 7:30 o'clock
under the auspices of the Tappan Pres-
'iyterian association. His subject on
this occasion will be "Phases of Citi-
zenshipiladGCharacter Building."
Althou"h Governor Ferris has been
a frequent visitor in Ann Arbor, he
will again be introduced to the stu-*
dents by Pres. -Harr1 B. Hutchins. The*
speal&r will bring an important mes-*
sage to university men and women.
LIT COMMITTEES^
J. B. Angell, 2nd, Senior President,
(hives Out Complete List
of Appointments:

* * * ** *
FIRST IROIIN SEEN
MAtY 1E A FREAK
nowns have appear d on the
campus again, or, at least, one
has, according to current ru-
mors. Diologists say that the
bird's appearance is not a sign
of spring but can only be con-
sidered as a migratory freak.
A robin was seen Saturday
mornin: and it is also report-
ed that one ilittered among the
branhes in the trees near West
ball last Monday. Many stu-
dents stopped to hear its forlorn
chirp.I
Some authorities state that
the bird came north during the
the recent spell of warm wca-
ther, and is on its way back
to southern regions. Those more
skeptical believe that the robin
is a veincarnated specimen es-
(aped I!om the museum.

4:

Ferrs toSpea WISON AND LANSING IRRITATED BY
at Union Serbices
ilt Como FCIVTr iOFcTEUIOaNCuD OMATS;
.eis will speak REC ALL MAY RESULT

TO 114)L1 MI'ETLNV THilS WEEK
James 13. Angell, 2nd, president of
the senior lit class, last evening gave'
out the list of appointees on the 1916
lit connittees. Some of these com-
n'ittees have already been at work;
the others are for special events oc-
curing later in the year.
The committee list follows:
Class Day-Ja'nes M. Barrett, chair-
man; Earle D. Atwater, Robert Bridge,
Paul M. Bowen. Esther A. Cook, Adele
H. Beyer, Helen W. Patterson.
. Memorial-Edward P. Wright, chair-
man; W. A. P. John, Alfred R. Thomp-
son, Frank L. Walters. Leola E. Royce,
Emilie G. Sargeaut, Genevieve O'Leary.
Sing --U. S. Wilson, chairman; Har-
ry W. Kerr, F. Porter Surgenor, Fred;
H. Tinsman.
Reception - -Philip C. Lovejoy,
chairman; Albert J.'Gans, Isaac Kin-
sey, Jr., John S. Switzer, Sarah L.
Stanley, Nena J. Maclntyre, Donna K
Sullivan, Constance Orcutt.
Souvenir-David R. Ballentine, chair-
man; Charles B. Crawford, R. L. Has-
kins, H. LeRoy Frost, Honor W. Gaines,
Kathlyn C. Holmes.
Cap and Gown-Louis C. Reimann,
chairman; James M. Cork, Merit D.
Haag, Edward Maguire, Ethelyn Bolen,
Marguerite Caley, Esther L. Bury.
Promenade---Clyde E. Bastian, chair-
man; Elliott W. Bisbee, Paul V. Rams-
dell, Morton H. Eilkinson, Jemima
Wenley, Aris L. VanDeusen, Ruth
Brown.
Pipe and Cane-Benjamin S. Motter,
chairman; Harold M. Bowcocke, Rich-
ard M. McKean, Wilson M. Shafer.
Banquet-Irwin C. Johnson, chair-
man; Kenneth W. Vance, Clifford C.
Stone, Robert P. Stewart.
Invitations--Arthur H. Torrey, chair-
man, George Murphy, Dwight W. Jen-
nings, Wilber Brotherton, Beatrice G.

*

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T IC SAL BGINS

l>'x ilwe 9
{O]i!'n

at Hill Audiitoriulli
Friday Afternoon at

Will

NO PRTll.ElI 1aE TO BE SHOWN
Tic-lets fur the All Nal ion Revue vill
go on sale Friday afternoon at 2:00
o'clock at the box oice, of Hill audit-
orium. In accord-nce with the cosmo-
politan spirit of the production, no
preference will be shown, those ap-
pearing frst receiving 'the best seats.
Th( entire main fioor will sell at $1.50,
tdgether with the lirst. four rows of
the lalcony. The remainder of the
balcony is to be disposed of at $1.00,
with the exception pf the last four
('onthiued on Pune SIx)

FOREIGN IMPRESSION OF LATEST
STAND OF ADMINISTRATION
IfAY BE CHIEF CAUSE
ACCUSE GERMAN AMBASSADOR
Ignatius Lincoln, Spy, Who Escaped
from Federal Authorities, Is
Re-Caught
Washington, Feb. 19.-It was made
known officially here today that Presi-
dent Wilson and Secretary Lansing are
greatly irritated over what they re-
gard as improper activity on the part
of the diplomatic representatives of
the Teutonic powers in this country in
connection with the latest development
of the submarine controversy. To say
there is any likelihood of a request for
the recall of Ambassador von Bern-
storff on account of these activities
is going too far, but it is a fact that
such a danger might aevelop if the
conduct to. which the administration
objects is persisted in.
The new difficulties between the
German ambassador and the adminis-
tration arise out of the impressions
that have gone abroad that the United
States has changed front on the ques-
tion of the immunity of arned mer-
chantmen from attack without warn-
ing. President Wilson and Secretary
Lansing are inclined to believe that
the German ambassador has sought to
influence the press reports in regard
to the attitude of the United States
on this issue. It was pointed out by
one official that several European gov-
ernments have on occasions, landed
their passports to diplomatic repre-
sentatives who have attempted to in-
fluence the press.
New York, Feb. 19.-Ignatius Tim-
othy Trebitsch Lincoln, self-vaunted
international spy Aio escaped from
the federal authorities on January 15
last, and then wrote letters to a news-
paper chaffing the department of jus-
tice, was caught at 7 o'clock tonight
at Broadway and 30th streets.
TURKS IN RETREA
BEFORE__USSIASI
Succeed in Getting Away Bulk of De-
fending Garrison Before
Invading Guns
TERRIFIC LOSSES ON BOTH SIDES
London, Feb. 19.-The main Turk-
ish Caucasian army managed to make
good its retreat before Erzerum after
the great Armenian fortress fell into
the hands of the Russians. Even the
bulk of the garrison left to defend the
widely separated forts got away before
the Russian guns smashed the inner
defenses. The bayonet charge of the
attackers was opposed by comparative-
ly a small rear-guard, fighting to the
last. It was in this final stage of
the capture of Erzerum which entailed
terrific losses on both sides.

WHATS GOING ON

Weather for Ann Arnor and vicnity
-Snow flurries and inot so cold; mod-
erae winds.

TODAY
-Professor Cross lee-

3:00 'clock-

Lambrecht, Hglen
ence E. Snyder.
Auditing-Melvin
man; Clarence E.
Pearl.
Finance-George
Isabel Hicks.

Vanderveer, Flor-
M. Beaver, chair-
ITfer, William A.
B. Fox, chairman;

tures, Memorial hall.
4:00 o'clock---Louis I'. Hall speaks,
Union.
7:00 o'clock - Gov. Ferris speaks,
Hill auditorium.
8:00 o'clock--Rabbi Wolsey speaks,
Ncrvberry hall.
TOiO-3ItOlW
7:30 o'clock-Michigan Dames meet,
Newberty ball..
8:00 o'clock- Christian Science lec-
ture, Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

Social-Lawrence S. Roehm, chair-
man; Boyd M. Compton, Alvin M.
Bentley, Russell S. Collins, Ruth E.
Kreger, Helen Ely, Charlotte B. Sites.

U-NOTICE
Monday, Gargoyle staff pictures,
Randall and Packs, 12:30 o'clock.

at

National Defense
General Wood and
Admiral Peary
Hill Auditorium, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 8 P. M.
Admission Free

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
STATE AND WASHINGTON STREETS
A. W- STALKER, D. i ., Minister
SERVICE, 10:30
SERMON: TaThe Sunnyside of the World, of
Religion, and of Life "

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.1::
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Cornell Loses Charles Barrett
Ithaca, N. Y., Feb. 19.-Charles
Barrett, captain of last year's
Cornell Varsity football team
and the greatest player in Cor-
nell's football history, has been
dropped from the university be-
cause of poor scholarship, ac-
cording to a statement by Dean
A. W. Smith of Silvey College
today. This is Barrett's senior
year.

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* 4:- *

",---

, ..

Governor

Woodbridge
Will Speak To STUDENTS
Hill Auditorium

rris
7 O'CLOCK

TONIGHT

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