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January 12, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

__

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THE BEST DRESSED MEN

have their clothes made-to-measure.
It is not a fallacy to say that clothes
reveal their origin even to the casual
observer. And there's an air of dis-
tinction to our clothes that can come
only from years of experience in tai-
loring garments. We have satisfied
your friends, why not you?
.. H. WILD COMPANY
Leading Merchant Tailors State St.1

Complete Line

Of

DIARIES

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan.. Published eve- y morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
seconid-class 'matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $2.50. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students' Supply
Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State+
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Francis F. MeKinney..... Managing Editor
John S. Leonard..........Business Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester News Editor
Tomn C. Reid...............telegraph Editor
Verne Burnett.............elegraph Editor
E. P. Wright........ . Sports Editor
.CB. Parker. .........\Assignment Editor
Conrad N. Church...............ity Editor
Edwin A. Ilyman................City Editor
Lee Joslyn........... ........City Editor
Irwin Johnson........Chr. Biiciency oard
Gordon 1). Cooke.......... Statistical Editor
Edward E. Mack........Advertising Manager
H-. Kirk White.......... Publication Manager
Y. R. Athseler Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers.... ........Accountani
C. T. Fishleigh .. Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
Leonard\ V. Nieter William F. Newton
Earl Pardee William I 1I. Fort
Reporters
I. \. Fitzgerald 1. L. Stadeker
WaldoR.1 IIum Colda Ginsberg
Martha Cray \Nat Thompson
W. R. Atlas R. T. Mc)onald
R. A. Bauingarth L. S. Thompson
Bruce Swaniey 1?. IL. Ziegler
R. J. Blum C S. Huntley
Business Staff
Albert r. t orne Roscoe Rau
E. C. Musgrave F. e1. Sutter
K. S. McColl 'Maxwell Cutting
C. 1. Campbell I). \. Shand
George Nohil
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1916.
Night Editor. ... . E. A. Baumgarth

SH EEHN'S

STUDENTS' BOOKSTORE

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
Cars imi on Eastern time, one hour faster
tan local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--8:i a.,
and houirly to 7:1o p. 1f., 9:10o p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars- 8:48 a. in. and
'ery two hs>urs to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
48 P. nL
Local Cars, Eastbound--5:35 a. in., 6:40 a. in.,
o: a. in., and every two hours to 7:o5 p. m.,
o5 p. M., 9:o5 p. in., 10:45 p. in. To Ypsi.
at only, 8:48 a. m. (daily except Sunday),
2o a. M., 12:05 p. n., 6:05 p. in., 11:15 p.
1 :15 a. m., 1:30 a. in.
Local Cars, Westbound-6:12 a. m.,- 7:so a.
, and every two hours to 7:50 p. t.. o10:20
m., 12:2o a. in.
,The Ann Arbor Saving s Bank
Organized 1869
Capihal.. .......$ 300,000.00
Surplus..........$ 150,000.00
Resources over ....$3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
Main Office, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ-
ersity Avenue.
COME IN AND TRY OUR
Chinese Combination Luneh
:30 A. M t 5:30 P. M.
SP. M. 5 to 7 P. M.
Michigan Inn
Chop Suey
1 E. Liberty St. Qpp. the Arcadia

TRY
ICHAPUAN'S JEWELRY STORE
For Afrm Clocks and Michigan Pins
113 50. MAIN STREET
Our "Tailor-Made" Clothes Cost No More
Than the Average "Ready-Made"j
CANSLE, The Tailor
108 E. Washington St Second Floor
CHOP off a few
minutes and a om o
GE+ORE'EY
WAX KING IOO
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $100,000 Surplus and Profit $$65,ooo
DIRECTORS:
WIRT COR.'NWELL WALDO M. ABDOTT
Go. W. PATTERSON HARRY M. HAWLEY
S. W. CLARKSON HARRISON SOULE
FRED ScHrNrIo ID. B. SUTTON
E. D KINNIE
- FOR
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS
GO BISCHOFF'S GRFEN
220 Chapin St. Phone 8o-M
The Farmers &, Mechanics Bank
South Main Street State Street Office
Corner Buron 330 S. State St.
A>GOOD STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED

Selected Editorial
TEACHER OR SCHOLAR?
(Chicago Tribune)
In spite of the constant criticism
of higher education one of the most
obvious and fundamental departments
of the educational system has almost
wholly escaped notice. The regulation
of policy by trustees who are invari-
ably business men, the metamorpho-
sis of the president from the scholar
to the financial agent, the congenital
frivolity of the modern youth w hoj
prefers dancing and athletics to
study, all these things are blamed for
the 'admitted fact that only about 10
per cent of students learn anything
commensurate to the money spent on
the process. The social value of a
college education is undeniable, but
the educational value is problem-
atical.
It is the teacher who has escaped
notice. Americans have been curi-
ously content to trust education to
scholars. As a novelist recently wrote,
instructors are chosen from those
who know how to learn instead ot
those who know how to teach.
The degree of doctor of philosophy,
of master of arts, of bachelor of laws
or of literature, especially when suf-
fixed by some such impressive Latin
abbreviation as Oxon, is considered
proof positive that its possessor is
an admirable teacher. To have dis-
covered some new gas or to have
written some erudite book is often
sufficient to obtain an impressive fac-
ulty appointment.
Conversation with these erudite
and valuable gentlemen will convince
any one that their interest is not .in
teaching. They are still interested in
gaining the approval of other erudite
professors, but they are rarely- in-
terested in gaining the approval of
the students. They are, most of them
franky bored with students. And
the students are, quite as frankly,
bored with them.
The student rarely finds more than
one or two men in his four years
who make him feel that using the
mind is a pleasant occupation. And
if he is acute, he will perceive that
faculty members who do love to teach
suffer from the disapprobation of
their fellow professors. It does not
do for a professor to become too
popular with the students. He is im-
mediately suspected of some sort of
quackery. His attempts to understand
the students are interpreted as syco-
phancy. He should be interested in
research and scholarly attainment.
So preoccupied are many o our
higher educationalis ts kith this sort
of thing that they deliver their lec-
tures, often the same ones year after
year, reluctantly stealing a few hours
a week from their more important
work of learning.
Somehow we suspect that if facul-
ties were to examine themselves they
would find a splendid aggregation of
scholars, but of teachers scarcely
one. Perhaps this is one reason why
the modern college youth is inter-
ested in frivolous affairs.

ow

HEAR ALL THE

Latest New York
Operatic and Popular
HITS__ _

Office Supplies in general.

The greatest stock in the County

at the

Main VETR"S
V1NIVERSITY SBOOKSTORES

.w

Cor. Maynard and William Streets

State
St.

WOULD YOU BE HAPPY?
Then buy a
HANDY DESK CALENDAR
You may also need a
"National" or Excelsior Diary

f (. -- ----

ma- s

Dancing Pumps

IF GENIUS CAME TO MICHIGAN
Ever since universities began a
flourishing forward movement, there
has been a retarding factor of class
room strangulation constantly on the
job. It springs from a false concep-
tion of democracy, and is common in
practically every university, college
and school. In Michigan it can be
seen when several back-row stud-
ents in a class grin at each other or
laugh at the expression of some or-
iginal idea; when necks are craned
at the quizmaster's book when he is
recording the recitation just com-
pleted; when students make it hard-
er for lecturers by impolitely pulling
out watches, yawning unrestrainedly
or talking sotto voce; when sections
of the class are gazing seriously
through the windows or at the ceil-
ing and when the professor's retreat
at the close of the hour is choked by
superfluous and affected questioning.
Too many of the keen minded stud-
ents at Michigan are out after cam-
pus popularity, and for that reason
feel that they have to recite modestly
and conservatively. The exchange
of critical looks amonghthe rest of
the class is so overwhelming that few
dare or care to resist its strength.
Freshman classes form the neces-
sary transition between prep school
and college ideals, but after the first
year there is an opportunity for any
one to add something vital to the dis-
cussion by talking more frequently
-that is providing they are terse and
to the point. Of course those who
"throw the bull" are never welcome,
but a whirr of clearly stated and or-
iginal ideas are what are wanted and
needed. Certain seniors, who have
grasped campus honorary titles and
discovered the futility of these as an
end, occasionally bring into the sun-
light, originality which has been bur-
ied for three years. Men like these are
becoming the life of many discussion
periods.
Our much heralded democracy is
often acting as a mire rather than
the firm ground necessary for a good
start. In the light of this criticism
it is interesting to think what would
happen if a genius, should come to
Michigan.
REHEARSALS BEGIN ON SECOND(
OFFERING OF COMEDY CLUB
Second Performance of "The Profes.
sor's Love Story" to Feature
J-Hop Festivities

Quarry's
Company,
Prescription
Store

For
Particular
People

CITY LAUNDRY
THOS. ROWE, Prcp.
Detroit Street Phone 457

7M

sav!aac ZVI^.1fI:

.
......

JANUARY
2 0%

SALE

GO TO
For the BEST in
SODAS
CANDIES
LUNCHES
On State
PARTICULAR LAUNDRY

DISCOUNT ON ALL WOOLE NS
FOR THE NEXT THIRTY DAYS
HENRY (AtCOMPANY, AILORS
North utrxversity Ava. Directly North of Law BiuIidiini

1

. .

r

-- .

...........nm

''

Patent and Dull Dancing
Pumps and Oxfords
for Men

P1OF J. S. RFVES READS

Patent, Dull, Bronze Kid,
and Colored Satins for Ladies

WAI-IR'S SHOE STORES
MAIN STREET STATE STREET

.. ...-- - . . . ' .
Womengs Organizations
The regular meeting of the Women's
League Board will be held in Bar-
bour gymnasium this afternoon at 4:00
o'clock.
Omega Phi will meet at 4:00 o'clock
today at 1212 Hill street.
All the women writing Junior play
lyrics and music are to meet today at
4:00 o'clock in Barbour gymnasium.
'Tickets for the Vocational Confer-
ence luncheon are on sale at Wahr's
book store and in Dean Jordan's of-
fice.
Women who wish interviews with
the Vocational Conference speakers

TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
MULTIGRAPHING
Hamilton Business College
State and Williams
Rowe Entertains Lake (aeneva Alen
Floyd A. Rowe, director of intram-
ural athletics, entertained last eve-
ning at his home in South State
street about 25 students who at-
tended the Lake Geneva conference
during the past summer. The eve-
ning was enjoyed socially and in-
formally. Further efforts will be
made to. carry out the spirit of the
conference on the campus and to in-
terest men in the coming camp this
summer.
Daughter Born to Mr. and Mrs. Tinker
Announcement has been made at
the "Y" that a daughter, Charlotte,
was born Monday to Mr. and Mrs.
Wellington H. Tinker of East Uni-
versity avenue. Both mother andi
child arc reported doing fine.I
Saginaw Students to Organize Clubc
All Saginaw students are urged toE
e present at the Union at 7:30
'clock tonight. An effort will be
nade to organize a Saginaw club. t

ENGLISH CRITICS COMMENI)
PROFESSOR CROSS NEW BOOK
"Hi ry of England and Greater
Britain" Favorably Reviewed
by the "Dial"
Prof. Arthur L. Cross' book on the
"History of England and Greater
Britain" receives a very favorable
review in the issue of January 6 of
the "Dial."
The reviewer calls attention to the
fact that the book is designed for the
use of advanced- classes in colleges
and universities, and also to the re-
cent date (Feb., 1914,) to which the
history is carried.
The conclusion of the review is as
follows:
"The book aims at the presenta-
tion of facts in the light of their sig-
nificance and historical succession,
land makes slight attempt to ap-
praise events or interpret the spir-
it and character of the English people.+
It is probably .the most satisfactory
text book in its field for college+
courses thus far written by an
American scholar."
---- 1
Dance and Banquet Programs-At-
tractive Ones, at The Ann Arbor Press. ,

PAPER AT SCIENTISTS' MEETING
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the political
science department, who was a dele-
gate at the convention at the Pan-
American scientific congress in Wash-
ington during the Christmas vacation,.
has now returned to Ann Arbor and
has resumed charge of his classes.
Professor Reeves did not return until
Monday because of the late adjourn-
ment of the congress. While a dele-
gate at the congress, he read a paper
on "Training in Political Science for
International Commerce."
can make arrangements through Elsie
Paul, '17.
Dean Myra B. Jordan is the speaker
this afternoon at vespers in Newberry
hall at 5:00 o'clock.
Dr. Peterson to Speak at Luncheon
Due to the many requests from the
student body that unrsing as a voca-
tion for women be *discussed at the
conference this week, the committee'
has secured the consent of Dr. Reuben
Peterson, of this city, to take up the
matter. Dr. Peterson will speak at
the Vocational Conference luncheon
which will conclude on Saturday noon.'
In addition playground work will be,
discussed by Mr. Ira Jayne, recreation
commissioner in Detroit. Mr. Jesse
Davis will talk on vocational training.
Dr. Glover is to speak on the training
offered in the university for actuarial1
work, whrile Dr. Schlotterbeck will
explain the training for pharmaceuti-
cal chemistry.
Tickets for the luncheon may *be]
procured 'from the committee of which
Josephine Randall, '17, is chairman.
Always see The Ann Arbor Press
for your printing if you want quality.
Press Bldg., Maynard street, Phones
No. 1.

i
'Y' EMLOYMENT BUREA
TRIES OUT NEW SYSTEM
Particular Wants of Students Desiring
Suminer Work to Be Filled
if Possible.
Through a new system adopted by
the "Y" employment bureau to find
summer work for students, it is ex-
pected that the number of positions
filled for the coming vacation will
completely surpass the record of past
years.
Applications for summer jobs are
being filled almost daily and Secre-
tary Philip C.' Lovejoy, '16, is anxious
to have all students who want work
sign up at once.
Under the new plan, men will state
the particular work desired, their ex-
perience in this line, wages expected,
and where they want to go. The bur-
eau will then proceed to discover the
specific jobs.
Instead of the former haphazard en-
deavors, firms will be approached who
have work that is wanted. By this
method, the "Y" will be able to place
experienced men in the positions for
which they are fitted.
"'TENTION STrUDE S:"
For quick MESSENGER CALL see
last ad on BACK OF TELEPHONE DI-
RECTORY. Phone 795. 4'17E.
Fischer .Party at Michigan Union
Friday evening, January 14. Dancing
front 9 to 2 o'clock. For tickets call
2370 or 236. jan11-12-13
CLOTHING
from the House of Kuppenheimer on
sale by N. F. Alhen & Co..H ain

Rehearsals have begun fur the sec-
ond production of the Comedy Club
play, "The Professor's Love Story,,.
which will be given as a J-Hop week
feature on Saturday afternoon, Feb-
ruary 12, at the Whitney theatre.
The date has been set with the idea
of making it convenient for the frat-
ernity house parties, that will be held
at the time, to, attend. Popular mat-.
inee prices viV prevail, and in view of
the fact that the performance of the
play before the holidays proved to be
the most successful of any .Comedy
Club production for several. years,'
those in charge are planning' for an-
other big audience.
At least two rehearsals a week will
be held from now until the second
performance is given in order to bring
the cast to the greatest possible: per-
fection.

I

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