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January 12, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-12

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THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Michigan

wily

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SIRVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 73.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1916.

PRICE FIVE't

OPERA DIRECTOR.
ENTHUSIASTIC AT
FIRST REHEARSALI

IRISN NATIONASL S
WITHDRAW OPPOSITION
TO CONSCRIPTION BILL
John E. Redmond Announces Party's
Support of Measure in i;ouse
3 n1 !i~m nnf

I

DR3 W. ROSENAU TOFREDERICK PALMER JOHN A. LOMAX TO
BE UNION. SPEAKERI LECTURESTONIGHT BENEXTSPEKERON
Sermon to 1 IlkiereORATORIALPROGRAM

I

I .

AUSTRIANS TAKE
STRONGHOLD THAI
CAPTURE OF MT. LOVU:EN Rt
NVE S DANGER TO AUSTRIAN
NAVAL BASE

by Noted Baltimore Rabbi in
1ill Auditorium

veter~an m~ ir 'orreNJpoJnetieIIyt()Wo
hirloiigli; If1 Been at 1roul Since
Priesent it Wr 'egan

11

CHAS. G. MORG N. JR..

PLEASED

1ITH SHOWING OF CAST IS JOHNS HOPKINS PROFESSOR GLUEST AT "TLE lDAILY" D1I.NER
AND CHORUS OPENING OF DEBATE REVEALS v
SCHIS)I IN THE LABOR PARTY Dr. William Rosenau, rabbi of the Frederick Palmer, who lectures at
ruEnE i A 'FineS' IHEA DTIgf "utaw Place Congregation of Balti- :00 o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium
SEV ERlAL FINDSO U N EAR T YOUNG MEMBERS OF HOUSE S11b more, Md., will be the speaker at the is the most famous of the war corres-
JECT TO PROVISIONS OF pondents in the field today. He is
Rehearsals for Chorns Tryouts at 7:00 THE BILL third Union service of the year to be the only American who has lived at
and Cast Tryout at Union at held in Hill auditorium at 7:00 o'clock the front with the British army and
8:00 o'Clock Ton gha London, Jan. 11.-At the opening next Sunday night, under the auspices the only English speaking correspon-
of the debate on the second reading of of the Jewish Student Congregation. (lent who has been with the British
"It was a very interesting showing the military service bill in the house fleet with the exception of Rudyard
and to eliminate any of the men at of commons this afternoon, John E. ASa associate of Professor Haupt ling.
this time would be an injustice," was Redmond, parliamentary leader of the in the department of Semitics at Johns Mr. Palmer is a graduate of Alle-
the sentiment of Chas. G. Morgan, Jr., Irish Nationalist party, announced Hopkins university, Dr. Rosenau is gh y C ege, and has been in every
new opera director, after having had that the Nationalists would put for- widely known as a scholar, and is the war as correspondent since 1893.
his first glimpse of the men who will ward no further opposition to its pas-4author of several well-known books, Among ome of the larger wars in
go to make up the 1916 Union opera sag among which "Jewish Ceremonial I- which Mr. Palmer has been as a
at the rehearsal held at the Union The Nationalist leader aamitted stitutions and Customs" and a volume correspondent, perhaps the best known
last night. that there was no doubt even in the on "Jewish Commentaries and Coln- are the Spanish-American war, the
The new director was more than minds of anti-conscriptionists the mentators" have gained especial re- E Russo-Japanese war and the Mexican
pleased with the material he has to message was approved by the great down. war. it was in the Spanish-American
select from and stated his first im- part of the British people. It is now Dr. Rosenau has announced as the war that he sailed around the world
pression of the final show by saying, believed that the minority. voting subject of his Ann Arbor address "The with Admiral Dewey at the beginning
"We should should have a wonderful against the bill on the second read- Place of Authority in Life." The rit- of the war.
cat and chorus from such splendid ing will be almost negligible. The only ual service on the occasion will be ! seats for the lecture will be on sale
material as this." members still expected to stand against conducted by Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, Nat Wahr's today. The general admis-
The first rehearsal was taken up it are Sir John Simon and a few of Temple Beth El, Detroit, supervis- sion will be 25 cetFts. while there
mainly by giving each of the tryouts radical followers. ing rabbi of the Jewish Student Con- will be a ftew reserved seats at 50
for cast parts opportunity to show The schism in the Labor party was gregation. nts.
their ability, while the chorus and revealed at the outset of the speaking - ------ - -- ---
pony 1tryouts were drilled in dancing. today, when William Crawford An-
Many of the men who have taken derson, a labor member, rose to move I
part in previous operas took an ac- the rejection of the conscription i MEET [
tive part in the tryout while several measure.
"finds" were unearthed. Questioning before the debate re-
The new director is more than vealed the fact that any young and
Thlene it tho bmk d exresshane enbodie m
plesedwit th bok. nd xvrssd able-bodied members of the house .

I'..

the idea that it would develop into a
wonderful show. Several of the mu-
sical numbers of the opera were
played during the evening, and their
effect reminded one of the song-hits
of previous operas.
Another rehearsal has been sched-
uled for tonight, the chorus tryouts to
meet at the Union at 7:00 o'clock,
while the cast tryouts are scheduled
for 8:00 o'clock. Owing to the fact
that Director Morgan will only re-
main in the city until Thursday, it
is necessary that every advantage be
taken at this time to get a fairly good
idea of the men who will make up
this year's opera.
Breathe Defiancer
In Radical Paper,

who had notrattested would be sub-
ject to the provisions of the bill and
forced into the service. This state-
rient was made by the premier. Au-
gustine Birrellachief secretary for
Ireland, estimated that there are
about 80,000 available men in Ireland
who had not attested. Fhe total num-
ber of unmarried men of- military age
he placed at 400,000, but said that ex-
ceptions would cut out over three-
fourths of these.
PROGRESSIVES TO
REITURN TO GIOIP.?1

Majority of
Favorj

d
National Committeemen
Amalgamation With
Republicans

fole bis"
lfige"

, Students Launch "Chal-
to Promote Free Speech I

A new intercollegiate monthly was
launched at Columbia university dur-
ing the Christmas holidays. The pa-
per was christened the "Challenge,"
with a prospectus stating its motto
of "free speech" as follows:
"Up to the present time the various
university and college papers have
maintained an un-American attitude
by suppressing articles that might tend
to antagonize the university author-
ities or some class of students in the
univefsity.
"Conservatism and suppression of
free expression of opinion have re-k
sulted in Challenge.
"Challenge is a magazine organized
to stimulate the free expression of
opinion among Americans students, to
the end that each American college
and university may become a conscious
informed and intellectual democracy."'
TOASTMASTERSINITIATE TWO
H. W. Lamb, '18L, and S. M. Abrams,'
'17E, Taken into Society.

WILL NOT INSIST ON ROOSEVELT,
Chicago, Jan. 11.-In a frank,
straightforward statement to the
American people, as Mr. Perkins
termed it, the Progressive national
committee, in session at the Congress
hotel tonight, opened the door for the
complete amalgamation of the Repub-
lican and Progressive parties. The
declaration fixed June 7 as the date
of the Progressive national conven-
tion, the same as that fixed by the
Republicans, and also in Chicago..
It declares for a reunion of the
party strength by the return of theI
Progressives to the Republican fold,
in order that the present Democratic
administration may be turned out.
The resolution for amalgamation, as
well as party principles, bears the sig-
natures of national committeemen to
the Chicago conference., That the
Progressives, too, will not insist on
the nomination of Colonel Roosevelt
by the Republicans as the price of
amalgamation was the specific state-
ment of George W. Perkins, who ar-
ranged the conference, and who was
understood to speak ex cathedra with

PromineAt Men and Women Will Pre-
sent Various Liies of En-
deavor to WNomen
GOV. FERRIS TO TALK FRIDAY
With the first meeting of the sec-
ond annual Vocational Conference on
Thursday, a new pathway of endeavor,
will be opened to the women of the
university.
In accordance with the plan of the
Women's League to interest women
in some others vocation beside that of
teaching, a number of men and wom-
en prominent in various lines of work
will be brought to Ann Arbor.
Mrs. Gary Wallace, who will open
the Conference in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall Thursday afternoon, makes
a specialty of Pharmaceutical Chem-
istry, but she will not confine her
talk entirely to that subject. From
close association with women's prob-
lems which she meets in the course of
her work on the editorial board of
the Ladies Home Journal, she has be-
come deeply interested in all lines of
work open to women. Dr. Gillette
Hayden, president of the American
Academy of Oral Prophylaxis, who
speaks upon the same program, will
take up the subject of dentistry for
women.
Miss Mary Snow, kesearch Secre
tary for the New York intercollegiate
bureau of occupations, will speak at
the Thursday evening meeting.
Lucinda Prince, of the Women's
Educational and Industrial Union of
Boston, will share the program with
Miss Snow. Mrs. Prince will talk of
her work as the head of the School of
Salesmanship there, the first to be
established in the United States.
President Harry B. Hutchins will
preside at the Friday afternoon meet-
ing. The speakers at this session will1
be Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris,
and Dr. Earl Barnes of Philadelphia.
On Friday evening Newberry Resi-
dence will be opened to the Confer-
ence guests, and all those who wish
to meet them. 'No invitations will be
issued, and all those who are inter-
ested in the Work of the Conference
are urged to come. At this informalI
gathering, Miss Mary Snow will give

Adelphi Initiates
Safeguard
dents,

Campis Moveenieit to
hives of Stu-
on River

OThER SOCIETIES TAKE ACTION
The Adelphi House of Representa-
tives started boosting the campus
movement for safeguarding lives of
student, oj the Huron river, by un-
animously voting through a resolu-
tion to that effect, at a meeting last
night. William A. Pearl, '16, Rhodes
scholarship winner, was the intro-
ducer of the measure. The text of the
resolution runs as follows:
"Be it resolved that the Adelphi
House of Representatives is in favor
of and willing to further any prac-
ticable means of safeguarding the lives
of students on the Huron river." The
word "safeguarding" was defined as
the protection, as far as possible, from
danger of drowning. The general.
sentiment of the assemblage was that
quick action should be taken. The
means which were suggested for mak-
ing navigation safer were essentially
as follows:
Convenient telephone connections
with the neighborhood and with the
city; ready access to life preservers,
grappling hooks, planks, ropes, boats,
etc., at various points along the
stream; a system of signs in places
readily seen, telling where such safe-
ty devices can be obtained; a system
of danger signals (board sign's, and
red lanterns if advisable) about dan-
ger holes for skating and over the
most dangerous undercurrents for
canoeing; and a method of periodical
reports as to the condition of such
devices.
The Adelphi has members from
practically every department and
class, and the introducers of the reso-
lution felt the organization represen-
tative enough to officially initiate the
movement among various campus so-
cieties. Nearly all the campus or-
ganizations will consider the same
question this week.
The rest of the evening was spent
in discussing the question of a stand-
ing finance committee. The subject
for discussion at the meeting next
Tuesday night will be a bill for in-

1
i
s
t
f
8
t
ti

The Texas Educator and Collector o
American Folklore Will Speak
January 4
TO SING PARTS FRO[ OWN
WORK ON "COWBOY BA LLA)S'
IS ENTHUSIASTICALLY RECEIVED
BY MANY COLLEGE CROWDS
HERE AND ABROAD
Through the efforts of Wilfred B.
Shaw, general secretary of the alumni
association, Prof. John A. Lomax, of
the University of Texas, will appear
in University hall Monday evening,
January 24, with his lecture and songs
of American folklore, under the aus-
pices of the Oratorical association.
In dealing with his subject, Professor
Shaw will give special attention to his
book on "Cowboy Ballads," a subject
on which he is well qualified to speak
and for which he is justly famous.
Professor Lomax has been more cr
less intimately associated with the
scenes and characters of these ballads
for many years. His early home was
near one of the principle cattle routes
leading to Dodge City, and many of
the songs which 'he sings in his pro-
gram were learned through hearing
them as the cowboys passed his home
driving their charges. The collection
has already become priceless and only
a very small portion of it has been
published. In the beginning of his
book, ex-President Roosevelt gave him
aid, acted as collaborator, and wrote
the introduction.
In addition to being secretary of the
University of Texas, he is president
of the American Folklore society.
Without exception he is the first an-
thority in this field, as indeed he
should be, since it is a field of his own
creation.
Ie has visited nearly all of the lead-
ing colleges and university here and
abroad, and has been heard by enthu-
siastic audiences everywbee-
rO REPEAT COURSE
IN ROAD BILING
Annual Series of Lectures in Highway
Improvement to Be Given
February 21 to 25
SPECIAL WORK IN EVENINGS
A second announcement has just
>een made by the highway engineer-
ng department of the second annual,
hort course in highway engineering
o be held in the engineering college
rom February 21 to 25.
Instruction will be given in road
building by members of the faculty of
he College of Engineering in co-op-
ration with the Michigan State high-
way department. Additional instruc-
ion will be given in lectures by men
noted in their particular line of work.
These lectures are:
"Economical Design of Highways
with Reference to Traffic"-By Ar-
(Continued on Page Six)

BRITISH TRY TO RELIEVE KUT,
Fight Course Through Turks to Re-
lIeve British Garrison; University
Mission Imperiled.
Vienna, via London, Jan. 11.-The
f capture of Mount Loveen on the west-
ern Montenegrin frontier by Austrian
' forces was announced by the war of-
fice tonight. Berane, in the interior
of Montenegro on the river Lim, also
has been taken. Mount Lovcen always
has been considered the Gibraltar of
the Adriatic. -
In Montenegrin hands it was a
great menace to Cattaro, Austria's al-
most impregnable naval base, which
could only be attacked with any pos-
sibility of success from Mount Lov-
cen. The Austrian feet in Cattaro
has co-operated with the land forces
in the attack on the Montenegrin
strong-hold.
British Try to Relieve Kut.
London, Jan. 11.-A strng British
relieving force is reported to be about
15 miles from the beleagured trdops
at Kut-El-Amara, which the Turks
are investing. They are fighting their
course eastward through the Sutan's
troops, which outnumber the British
two -to one. No news has been re-
ceived for the last three days from the
garrison, which however, is supposed
to be holding out stubbornly. The
decisive battles have probably al-
ready been fought.
Not since the Boers surrounded the
British at Ladysmith has there been
an English army in so great a peril.
All London is awaiting the news from
the besieged, with anxiety and even
alarm. This fiasco, as it appears for
the present at least, is the culmination
of a series of disasters for the Brit-
ish, resulting from lines of communi-
cation too long and too poorly defend-
ed for safety.
The fighting is now going on with
bloody fury, along the Tigris river,
down which light artillery has been
sent from Bagdad to the Turks. The
defenses, recently repaired by the
British, are believed to be almost im-
prenable, and officials are hopeful for
the safety of the garrison.
University Mission Imperiled.
The relieving party of British passed
a few days ago through the city of
Busrah, Arabia. In this city is the
hospital maintained by the University
of Michigan Y. M. C. A. The city will
(Continued on Page Six)
TECHNICS HOLD SMOKER
Engineering Magazine Rated as One
One of the Best in Country
The Michigan Technic held one of
its most successful smokers last night
when both the old and new members
of the staff gathered around the fire
in the Engineering society rooms. Rob-
ert McNamee, '17E, managing editor,
L. C. Rowley, '16E, business manager,
H. E. Montelius, '17E, advertising man-
ager, F. K. Hirth, '16E, art editor, and
other staff men, including H. A. Tay-
lor, '17E, J. H. Schmidt, '16E, and F.
H. Sweet, '18E, gave short speeches on
their respective departments.
As a step toward the perfection of
the Technic organization, it is planned
to make these smokers a periodic af-
fair and eventually make the Technic
the best college engineering journal
in the country. A recent rating in the
"Engineering Record" placed the Tech-
nic on a par with the Cornell scientific
magazine as the two best in the
country.

I WAT'S GOING ON

r-"-
r

The weather for Ann Arbor and vi-
einity-Continued fair and cold.
TODAY
Saginaw students meet to organ-
ize club at 7:30 o'clock at Union.
Tau Beta Pi dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock.
All-Fresh Glee Club rehearsal, 7:15
p. m., McMillan hall..
TOMORROW
Canadian club hold meeting and
smoker at Union at 7:30 o'clock.

Toastmasters, a. campus honorary respect to Colonel Roosevelt.
society, held its initiation banquet last' "We are all hoping, said Mr. Per-
evening at the Renellen Hospice, at kins, "with deliberation that both par-
which time Herbert W. Lamb, '18L, ties will agree on somebody, and it
and Staats M. Abrams, '17E, were need not necessarily be Colonel Roose-
taken into the organization. (Continued on Page Six)

a short talk about her work with the creasing the United States army to
(Continued on Page Six) 250.000 men.

,._

I*r-rr ..

Hill
Auditorium
Tonight
8 O'clock

Your Chance
to Hear

FREDERICK

PALMEFresh from the
PALMER Battle Front

The Only Official American Press Man With The British Forces
"MY YEAR OF:THE WORLD WAR"

seats
at
~Wa hr' s

A Vivid Narrative With MOTION PICTURES of the Real Thing

25c-

La

p U - I

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