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December 15, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-15

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THIV MICHIGAN DAILY

"Great Harm Wrought to China in Treaty With Japan", Dr. Reid

DECRIES JAPAN'S
THEATMENTOFOLD
EMP'IRE ASCRUEL
DR. REID, AUTHORITY ON CHI-
NESE MATTERS, STATES AR-
GUMENT IN LETTER

CHANGES NEEDED
IN RURAL SCHOOLS

DIPLOMAcY HOLDS
AIITIfI'P iniIrnrrT

At The Theatres

r

For

Xmas

E FORCED INTO TREATYl

"All Things in China Dominated by
Japan Since Commencement of
War a Year Ago"
An article entitled, "Crus --What
It Means to China," was recently pub-
lished in The Michigan Daily, and
was written by Dr. Gilbert Reid, of
Shanghai, China, to Rev. F. Ohlinger,
of this city. Mr. Ohlinger has recent-
ly received another letter by Dr. Reid
on the subject of the treaty between
Japan and China which is entitled,
"Japan's 'Unkindness to China."
The letter in substance is as fol-
lows:
"The ratification and the exchange
of the treaty between China and Ja-
pan, bearing on certain points of
agreement, have at last taken place,
with very little commotion. This is a
great fault in Chinese character, they
forget too quickly.
"A year of complications in China
has passed. These complications have
coalesced in aggressions from Japan,
and have resulted in loss of dignity,
prestige, and power to China. Japan's
great loss is the loss of confidence by
the Chinese people. Whether Japan
will be able to surmount this impedi-
ment either through her predominent
military power or through the ameni-
ties of diplomatic finesse cannot now
be determined. Personally I fear that
Japan will win out, and this old na-
tion of distinguished deeds will bow
to: the will of her smaller neighbor.
"The past year has passed so quick-
ly, and the events taking place in the
Far East have beenesohidden amid
the more startling events of Europe,
that the only way we can present the
facts concerning the harm wrought
on China by Japan is to itemize them
in briefest form, much like studying
theology through the Thirty-nine Ar-

Secretary Lane Says They Are in the
Greatest Need of Improvement
in His Report to Congress
URGES SAFETY IN IRRIGATION
Washington, D. C., Dec. 14.-Has
America given sufficient attention to
the development of its greatest re-
source, the 22,000,000 school boys and
girls of this country?
This question was discussed at
length in Secretary of the Interior
Lane's report to congress, in which
he also advises better measures for
the use of rivers in irrigation pur-
poses. Mr. Lane urged an improve-
ment of rural school conditions.
"Education is indeed our foremost
industry," said the secretary, "from
whatever point of view it may be re-
garded. Yet I am assured that it has
made less progress than any of our
other industries during the last 30
years. We have gone to Europe for
the new methods with which we have
experimented.
"The American people are not indif-
ferent to their schools. They pay for
their support almost as much as they
do for the entire federal government;
in round numbers, $750,000,000, which
keeps an army of 600,000 teachers at
work.
"The United States maintains a bu-
reau of education in this department,
which, upon a small appropriation,
collates as best it can the figures and
facts which most inadequately tell the
story of the growth and use of this
most brilliantly conceived piece of
governmental machinery."
The bureau should become a center
for the results of educational experi-
ments, according to Mr. Lane. It is a
branch of public work which should
be conducted in a manner similar to
that employed in thf bureau of mines.
Rural schools are in the greatest
need of improvement. "An ambitious
people will go where education can ne
had for their children," he stated.
"There is no sense in talking of the
charms of country life if the school
at comnand is no mere modern than a
(Continued on Page Five)

i

TEUTONS CONTINUE ADVANCE semble numbers are good.
- The bill for the last half of the week
Big events in the past week have ii most promising. It has such reput-
hinged largely upon phases of diplo- able Keith acts as the Australian
macy in which the United States has woodchoppers, Guerro and Carmen,
been deeply involved. By last Wed- Keno and Green, and others. / Next
nesday morning, the message of Pres- Sunday, Frederick Perry, supported by
ident Wilson had appeared through- a company of stars, will appear in the
out the land, with its advice for big- spectacular photo play, "The Family
ger national defenses and with its Stain." . .
anathemas against hyphenated citi- "September Morn" will appear for
zenship of any belligerent brand. The three days starting next Monday.
week ended with irresponsible at-
tacks upon the Austrian charge
d'affaires by press writers in Wash- An avalanche of mail orders and
ington, and with the sending of an reiterated requests over the telephone
ultimatum from this government to for seats for the engagement of Henry
Austria. The most acrid terminology Miller and Ruth Chatterton in "Daddy
of any note since the war began waI Long Legs," at the Whitney Theater
couched in this missive, but it is three on Thursday, December 16, show that
chances to one certain that Austria theater-goers of this city are extraor-
will desist from torpedoing neutral dinarily interested in the impending
passenger liners, while American cit- appearance of the co-stars in Jean
izens are on board. '1Webster's fascinating comedy. In
The offiges of Von Bethmann-Holl- view of the fact that "Daddy Long
weg and of Asquith have both re- Legs" has been for nearly three years
sounded with exaltations Cf the prin- the biggest dramatic hit on the Ameri-
ciples of peace, and both seem willing can stage, it 'is not surprising to ob-
that the war should cease, provided, serve this rush for seats, for the play
Lhe enemy take the initiative in mak- is as eagerly awaited here as it was in
ing peace proposals. New York, Chicago and San Francisco
Meanwhile German-Bulgarian-Aus- where, in each city, it broke house
trian troops have swept back the de- records for big business.
fenders of Serbia so that only the --
equivalent of a Michigan county re- No roller skating at Weinberg's
mains in actual possession of the on Monday, Wedi:eday and Thursday
Serbs and their expeditionary allies. evenings. Ice skaters can then enjoy
The Germans are even reported to the music. dect.5
have crossed the Greek border in ----- --
their pursuit of the Anglo-French in Students, for the most safe, speedy
the south. It is not likely, however, reliable economical Parcel and Mes-
that Saloniki will fail, because of the Aenger service, call 2023. nov3tf
powerful guns on entente dread-
naughts patrolling the Aegean. Rus- Buy that box of Maize and Blue cho-
sia and France have each made slight colates NOW. These chocolates are
gains on their respective battle fronts the kind that keep their original fla-
Conscription in England seems ex- vor a long time. Bloomfield' is the
tremely unpopular, and as the "dies ideal place to buy. dee'5
irae" of Lord Derby is near at hand,
this question will be sure to prove of CHRISTMAS
burning and immediate interest. The Everything in Christmas presents
Oscar II is approaching the Scandin- for men. N. F. Allen Co., Clothiers.
avians, and is preceded by a brilliant- Main St. eodFri
ly written manifesto to all the Euro-
pean courts. Sea-sickness, mutiny, A store to get good clothes-Reule
and acrimonious discussions about Connn & Flegel. nova-7-12-17-21
American affairs have livened up the
trip. 2255 2255 2255 2255
Powdered wax for dancing floor, in EXCLUSIVE
perforated top cans. C. H. Major & young men's haberdashery on sale b
Co. Phone 237. edtdec21 N F. Allen & Co., Main street.
CLOTHTOU We can do your papering, painting,
Drop into Reule, Conlin & Fiegel's tinting, etc., at once. C. H. Major &
store for your clothes. Co. Phone 237. edtdec2l

11A I lull INI L111D I IPenty offgirls, songs and dances
make up the bill now playing at the
Difficulties With Austrian Govern. Majestic. There is much to amuse,
mient and Wilson's Message and the high-class Italian quartette is
Arouse Discussion worth hearing. The opera selections
are all ems and thir anin en -

CH11LL UiLV17 aV1V c'L11U Cll i

GOS

Made of Walrus, Sea], Morocco,
Cowhide, Calf and Pig

Book Racks

Ash Trays

Brass Desk Sets

Bill Folds

Brief

Cases

Fountain Pens

Cigar

Cases

Cigarette

Cases

Leather Collar Bags

Hand Bags

Music Rolls

Engraved or Plain Stationery
Smoking Sets

Necktie Rack:

Wallets

Telescopic Drinking Cups, Photo Books
Purses, Brass or Glass Inkwells,
Leather Stationery Portfolio
Toilet Sets, Pipe Racks
MAYER, SCHAIRER Co.
STATIONERS-PRINTERS-BINDERS

"1. Japan's fifst unkindness to
hina was in refusing the request to
emain neutral. As a matter of fact
his harm must be traced to England,
r Japan entered on war at England's
equest, or, as the London Times said
ngland's 'appeal.' Germany was
nxious to neutralize Tsingtau, and
mit the fighting to the seas, not only
r her own security but for that of
hilna.
"2. Japan insulted China by land-
g troops at the port of Lungkou, far
moved from German leased terri-
ry, and within Chinese jurisdiction.
he ignored China's neutrality, pro-
sts and requests. She helped China
preserve the form of legality by
commending a war-zone which was
advantage to Japan but not to Ger-,

"3. Greater harm was done to
China, when Japan, in the face of the
strongest protests, occupied with her
nilitary forces the railway west to
Lsinanfu, and would have advanced
iorth to Tientsin but for the opposi-
ion of England. This occupation was
not a military necessity, for it did not
aelp Japan in capturing Tsingtau,
neither have the troops been removed
ince the surrender of the Germans
vas effected.
"4. When, after the removal of
Aerman prisoners to Japan, and after
omplete possession of 1 Tsingtau,
rapan refused the request of the Chi-
ese government that the war-zone be
bandoned and all Japanese troops
emoved from the interior of Shan-
ung, Japan made this request a pre-
ext for issuing 21 demands. The im-
>ression made was that Japan had
nore power in China than China her-
elf.
"5. Japan had no right to make
emands of China about matters per-
aining to Chinese territory and not
o Japanese. Demands would have
een suitable only if Japan had van-
uished China in war. Having gone
o war with Germany at England's
equest, this was no ground for de-
nanding all kinds of rights of China.
"6. The Japanese minister showed
ack of courtesy in presenting the de-
lands direct to the president, and not
> the foreign office.
"7. Japan insisted that the Chinese
overnment shold keep secret all the
emands and all the negotiations,
(Continued on Page Six)

PROPOSES COMPULSORY
TRA1IING__FOR YOUTHS1
Chamberlain's Senate Bill Provides
Military Practice for Bobs 1
From 12 to 23.
Washington. D. C.. Dec. 14.-Sen-
ator Chamberlain today introduced in
the senate a bill providing for univer-
sal military training for boys between
the ages of 12 and 2? inclusive.
The only ones exempted according
to the provisions in Senator Chamber-
lin's bill are the physically unfit,
members of the permanent military or
naval forces of the United Stales,
school teachers employed as military
or naval instructors, persons employ-
ed in the police or prison service of
the United States and in the diifereat
states and cities, the morally unfit,
inembers of religious sects whose creed
forbids its members to partake in war,
sailors, those in public service where
the interest of thepublic service de-
mands it, and other persons upon
whom the proposed training would
work a great hardship.
The training is divided into three
periods. The first is from 13 to 14,
the second from 14 to 16, and the
third from 16 to 18. In the first pe-
riod the training will be 90 hours
each year and will be devoted to cales-
thenics, and other military instruc-
tion without arms. In the second pe-
riod the training will be for not less
than 90 hours each year and will in-
clude military training with the rifle,
including gallery practice. The third
period of training will be for 90

s112 S. Main Street"

' 1

i

SHOP EARLY

SHOP EARLY

The Specially Shop of Originations
308-10-12 SOUTH MAIN STREET
ONLY 9 SHOPPING DAYS BEFORE CHRISTMAS

Ann Arbor, Michigan

hours, and in addition 10 days in camp

GIFTS
FOR WOMEN
Desk Sets
Scissors Leather Case
Salt and Pepper Sets
(Sterling)
Table Lamips with Shades
Lemon Sets in Sterling
Individual Egg Sets
Crumb Scrapers
Silver Cream and Sugar
Casseroles
Electric Irons
Electric Floor Lamp
Library Sets
Best Gas Range
Traveling Slippers
Fire Screen
Andirons
Fire Sets
Chafing Dishes
Hot Water Bottle
Bird Cages in Wicker
Hot Plates
Manicure Sets
Five O'clock Teas
Salad Bowls
Electric Vacuum Sweeper
- Eden Electric Washer
Hot Water Bottle (Aluminum)
Hong Kong Tables

GIFTS

each year. It will include field
cises, target practice and other
tary instruction.

5

exer-
mili-

FOR MEN
Mahogany Ash Stand
Traveling Slippers
Poker Racks and Chips
Flashlights
Revolvers
Guns
Pocket Knives
Cigaret Boxes
Himidlores
Razor (all styles)
Silver Shaving Set
Skates
Waste Baskets
Boxing Gloves
Fishing Rods
Reels
Refrigerator Baskets
Thermos Bottles
Lap Board (for auto)
Dressing Case (leather)
Ash Tray
Tobacco Jars
Tipperary Putps
Golfi Blls
Caddy Bags
Punch Set
Hunting Coat

GIFTS
FOR BOYS
Skates
Watches
Sleds
Erectors
SPocket Knives
Battleships
Blocks
Boxing Gloves
Stuffed Animal
Tool Boxes
Work Benchtes
Air Rifles
.22 Rifles
Wooden Horses
Skate-Mobile
Coaster Wagons
Velocipedes
Skudder Cars
Toys
Baseball Glores
Football Suits
Snow Shovels
Ranks
Vest Pocket Flashlight
Scout Hatchet
Cork Gun
Water Pistols
Skating Shoes

GIFTS
FOR GIRLS
D~ishes
Blocks
Skates
Tricycles
Deois Buggies
Watches
Toys
Wooden Animals
Mechanical Dogs
Stuffed Cats
Scissor'
Roller Skates
GIFTS
FOR BABY
Silver Knives and Forks
Baby Scales
Baby Hampers
Kewpie Trays
Brooms
Carpet Sweepers
Baby Spoons
Non-breakable Plates
Toys
Walking Dolls
Stuffed Dogs

At the age of 18 the cadet enters the
citizen army or the citizen navy, where
he serves until the end of his twenty-
third year. During this period the
training will be not less than 120
hours or twenty days each year. Ten
days each year will be spent in camp
with continuous training.
See our line of chafing dishes and
electric appliances. H. L. Switzer Co.
210 State. edtdec2l
2255 2255 2255 2255

-

ta (IRI'l N" I! '', I , 1: : g
MR,

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