100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 11, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

mon THE MICHIGAN DAIL

.._

. ..

Gregory Points Out Need for Better Neutrality Laws
I I I

DECRIS PRACIClE
ATTORNEY GENERAL DELIVERS
ANiNUAL MESSAGE 10
CONGRES
WANTS WAGES FOR CONVICTS
Advocates Federal Manufacturing
Plant in Order to Make Work
For Convicts

Washington, D. C., Dec. 10.-Imme-
diate improvement in the neutrality
laws was urged by Attorney General
T. W. Gregory in his annual report to
congress, submitted today. He de-
clared that these laws were especially
deficient in the following three partic-
ulars:

First: "It should be specifically
made a crime against the United
States to place bombs or other ex-
plosives on vessels sailing from the
ports of the United States."
Second: it should be made a crime
against the United States for any per-
son to escape or attempt to escape
from an interned warship of a belig-
erent nation."
Third: "There is no adequate law
under which the government may
seize and retain arms and am-
munition which are being ex-
ported, or which there is rea-
son to believe are about to be export-
ed. Neither is there any adequate law
under which the government may seize
and retain arms and ammunition about
to be used in connection with military
expeditions as prohibited by the Fed-
eral Penal Code."
The suggested revisions arise direct-
ly as the result of experiences con-
nected with the Mexican situation and
the European war.
Prisoner's Earnings Vet Aside
A portion of the earnings made by
prisoners in penitentiaries will be set
aside for the family of the prisoner,
if he is married, or for his own use
upon the expiration of his term, if he
is single, according to the Attorney
General.
"Perhaps the most difficult problem
involved in enforcing the law has been
how to punish or confine criminals
without at the same time punishing
their families," he said. "Undoubted-
ly many prisoners are better fed,
clothed and cared for within the walls
of these penal institutions than they
would be on the outside, but in a very
large number of cases the families of
these prisoners are left destitute, and
in a substantial number of cases their
condition is desperate. As a part of
the plan of prison industries to be
presented to Congress I shall urge
the payment monthly to the families
of prisoners of a substantial portion
of the amount earned by prison labor
and, in cases of single men, the reten-
tion of some portion of these earnings
to be paid over to them on their being
released from confinement.
"Not only would this plan help many
innocent and destitute members of the
families of these convicts, but would
be a great incentive to industry on the
part of prisoners and encourage a
feeling of pelf-respect and hope which
confinement should never be permit-
ted to destroy."
For more than 15 years the greater
part of the inmates of the Atlanta and
Leavenworth penitentiaries have been
busy adding new buildings to these in-
stitutions. This work is finished and
the Attorney General states that 2,500
men will be out of employment by
January 1, 1917. He proposes to use
them in prison industries, such as a
furniture plant at Leavenworth and a
textile mill and twine slant at At-
lanta. These products would be used
by the government, the furniture for
government offices, the textiles for
mailbags, blankets and tents, and tie
twine for the postoffice department,
which expends $250,000 for this neces-
sity annually.
A building is needed for the Depart-
ment of Justice, Mr..Gregory declared.
He outlined a number of other im-
provements desired, among which
were included the following revision
of the juvenile court laws, an amend-
(Continued bottom of Column Six)

j At The Theatres
Will M. Hough, who, with Frank R.
Adams and Joseph E. Howard, wrote
the long string of musical comedy
successes that made the La Salle the-
atre and the Princess theatre, Chicago,
famous throughout the country, has
entered the field of vaudeville writing
this season, and plans to devote a part
of each year writing for the varieties.
The success, fThe Night Clerk,"
which is playing at the Majestic, was
Mr. Hough's first venture into the
field for miniature musical comedy
for vaudeville. Tonight is the last
time for this play, which has been
well received.
All the fascination of a pretty girl's
fight for a chance in life is set forth
in "Daddy Long Legs," in which Klaw
and Erlanger will present Henry
Miller and Ruth Chatterton at the
Whitney theatre on Thursday, Decem-
ber 16. This story of a modern Cin-
derella, written by Jean Webster and
first published in magazine form, has
charmed over six million readers.
"Daddy Long Legs" has youth,
charm and quaint humor. It is the
story of a pretty waif in a bleak New
England orphan asylum, whose head
is full of dreams of becoming a great
author. One day, while the trustees
are visiting the asylum, Judy rebels
against the tyranny of the austere
matron. One of the visitors, Jervis
Pendleton, a rich and philanthropical
man of the world, admires her spirit
and decides to give her a chance in
the world. Judy is not to know the
name of the man who befriends her,
but is told to write him monthly let-
ters addressed to "John Smith." She
sees his grotesque shadow cast on the
wall by the lights of his motor car
and nicknames his "Daddy Long
Legs."
TO. REMODEL SOUTH WING
OF OLD UIVERSITY HALL
Building to Be Used After Second Se-
mester for Language and
Landscape Courses.
The old South Wing of University
hall, one of the first buildings on the
campus, is being completely remod-
eled inside and after the second se-
mester, will be occupied by the
teaching force of the Romance lan-
guages and the department of Land-
scape Design.
The south wing, which was former-
ly occupied by the department of Zoo-
logy and Botany and which has been
vacant since the completion of the
new Science building, is being com-
pletely changed with the exception of
the treasurer's office. New stairways,
as wide as possible without changing
the old brick walls, are being built
and at the.end of the corridors, racks
are being placed to hold fire hose and
extinguishers. As another precaution
against fire the building will not con-
tain more than 40 people at any time
and the largest classes will be con-
fined to the first floor.
As all the floors before contained
many small rooms that were used by
the teachers for offices, all of the par-
titions have been torn down and the
inside remodeled on a completely new
plan.'
The first three floors and part of
the fourth will be occupied by the Ro-
mance languages. The remainder of
the fourth floor will be given over to

the offices and class rooms of land-
scape designing.
The new plan of the inside will be
as follows: The first floor will con-
tain three class rooms and a large
seminary room besides an office; the
second floor will have three class
rooms, one reading room, and a Cercle
Francais room, besides the office; the
third will have three class rooms,
and three offices, while the fourth
which will be occupied jointly by the
Romance languages and the depart-
ment of Landscape Design will con-
tain four class rooms and one office.

BOOKS WORTHREADING
"THE SHOES OF HAPPINESS."-By
Edwin Markham.-Doubleday, Page
& Co.-Garden City, L. I.
After a strange silence of 14 years,
Edwin Markham, author of "The Man
With the Hoe," has published his third
book of verse. The volume, which
was first announced under the title of
"Virgilia and Other Poems," now ap-
pears as "The Shoes of Happiness."
From a poet who had placed himself
in the highest rank of contemporary
singers, much was to be expected.
Edwin Markham's golden shower more
than justifies this hope. The title-
poem, with a wealth of imagery and
unbroken melody, retells a simple al-
legorical tale of the Orient. When one
reads this story he is unconsciously
carried away from the tyranny of
noise and years into a magical East
with its rose-enchanted eves, moon-
gray gardens, and the dream-far mur-
murings of twilight seas on wind-for-
gotten shores.
"Nine are the nightingale gardens
there
That hang all night in a moon-white

At Other Collegesf
Syracuse Faculty Gets Bowling League
Syracuse, N. Y., Dec. 10.-Members
of the faculty of Syracuse University
have organized a bowling league. A
tournament opens today.
Dartmouth Considering Co-Education
Hanover, N. H., Dec. 9.-varmouth
college is considering opening its
doors to women. A benefactor of the
college has offered to donate the.
money for two dormitories, provided
tiat co-education is established.
New Conference Organized in West
Palo Alto, Cal., Dec. 10.-The refus-
d of the Pacific Northwestern Con-
frence to prohibit freshmen from1
prticipating in varsity athletic con-
tsts has resulted in the formation of
e new conference, with the following
nembers,: Washington, Oregon, Ore-
pn Aggies and California. This
eaves the old conference with but
hree schools, Washington State,
Whitman and the University of Idaho.
tanford's relation with the new and
Zie old conference is still undecided.

i

E

I

{

air; vVIllinois Against Baseball Abolition
Fifty the fountains of silver leap, Urbana, Ill., Dec. 9.-The University
Whose sound is soft as the listless flow f Illinois has decided not to abide
Of streams that forever linger and go y the ruling of the Conference of-
Down delicate, dream-far valleys of ials, who abolished baseball as an
sleep." tercollegiate sport in the "Big
bine." Ilinois is supported in her
We are told in the story of a sultan nove by Ohio State and Northwestern,
who sent his vizier in quest of the tnd she threatens as a last resort to
shoes of a happy man. When the)olt the Conference, and ally herself
"happy man" was found it was discov-vith Michigan and other schools. It
ered that he wore no shoes! Simples reported that Stagg of Chicago is
as is this allegory, Mr. Markham has'he man who was behind the move to
made it the excuse for a largess ofbolish baseball.
exquisite poetry.
exquisit sostryh vo lume ln al IM ock Trial Held at U. of C.
There are six stories in the Cincinnati, Dec. 10.-The annual
but the "Shoes" is the best, as it i mock trial of freshmen delinquent in
the longest. The "Juggler of To their observance of campus tradi-
raine," one of the narratives, is fountions took place at the gymnasium of
na-i n-n a-pci-na rik n nl P m Ari i n1 ie t.

I
S

eu oil a lu aC e t C(-i v0. 'egel
of the Madonna. There are many ve
iations of the legend, including d
by Anatole France, but "The Jugg'
of Touraine" is the first appeara&
of the tale in modern poetry.
"Virgilia," the long love poem wh
attracted so much attention on its'st
appearance some years ago, is iod-
ed in this volume, together wi a
sequel, called "The Crowning Fr."
Of the two, "Virgilia" remains tbet-
ter poem. Space does not perathe
poem to be given in its entireand
to quote merely a few lines we be
an injustice both to the readerd to
a noble poem.
In these days of unrest am, thej
nations, Mr. Markham's pc onE
"War and Peace" and onocial
Vision," are especially timely in-t
teresting. He still holds to, old
faith in the brotherhood of n In:
stead of being overwhelmed the
contradictions of modern life has
held fast to certain definite opti-E
mistic beliefs. His is no mry to
dusks and glooms of thoughut ant
unswerving fidelity to the it ofe
beauty, which is another e forb
truth. He believes in the In-tality
of the soul and much of his iration
is derived from the Bible. Ias, in- b
deed, written a book on tlPoetryL
of Jesus." One of the morautiful f
of the poems at the close o latesta
a
book of verse is entitled, : Gar- t
den of the Sepulcher." l
To many to whom Mr. iiam is
kfiown as the author of sonnet,
"The Wharf of Dreams," tlwill be t
a pleasure in the revelat)f con-
n4
tinned mastery over this dit form
which he shows in "Lion a'oness."
P.
It is impossible to resist empta-1
tion to quote this sonnet, at the
risk of exceeding the limitich my
editor imposes:
"One night we were ter, you th
and I, th
And had unsown Assyria lair,
Before the walls of Balrose in 11
air.
Low languid hills were d along
. the sky, I
And white bones markeewells of
alkali, T]
When suddenly down ti-path a

the University of Cincinnati la
week. The affair was conducted
the manner of a regular court, ai
the building was filled with specd
tors.
Bloomington, Ind., Dec. 10.-With
great deal of ceremony, ground w:
broken today for the new gymnasiu
of the University of Indiana.
Norman, Okla., Dec. 10.In "Spo
Gayer, captain and' full back of ti
Oklahoma university eleven this sec
son, that team had a man who coul
pass consistently farther than mo
players can kick. He made severf
forward passes of 50 yards, and i
one game he is credited with a pas
which attained the remarkable di
tance of 55 yards. His mark is clain
ed as a record in this departmentc
the game.
Berkeley, Cal., Dec. 10.-Due to th
early opening of school, the first se
mester will close before Christmas a
the University of California. Fina
examinations will be over by Decem
ber 18.
Berkeley, Cal., Dec. 10.-In an effor
o arouse interest in the propose
Union at California, the Daily Cali
ornian has been writing a series of
articles describing the work and his-
ory of student unions in other col-
eges and universities.
Princeton, Dec. 10.-The board of
he Daily Princetonian, the student
ewspaper of Princeton university,
ecently completed a file of the
rincetonian for the college year
878-79, and sent it to Woodrow Wil-
on, who was managing editor of the
aper during that year.
Madison, Wis., Dec. 10.-Students at
he University of Wisconsin will use
he state capitol building for their an-
ual Junior Promenade on February
. Many state officials will attend.

- -,

.st
in
ndD
a-
a
as e
m mi
in
lo
h
ze be
b
d Tb
st 7
LI R
n t
5- fe
-Pr
i
f gir
se
to
e
-up
t ve
1 is
qu
an
rio
t Inv
frc
- bu
bee
. ab]
wi]
an
try
vie
wh
ste
val
pro
Wo
Ni
exp
had
aut
talk
kick
in d
is t
poi
ct'

'Ifl[MUSIC COLUN
A galaxy of favorites will appea
the program of the Complimen
Recital in Hill auditorium, Tue
evening, December 14, to be g
under the auspices of the Univer
School of Music.
The general public of Ann Ar
as well as delegates to the S
Grange convention are cordially
vited to attend this concert, for w
no admission charge will be mad
In a certain sense, the progi
will be more popular than the p
grams usually offered on this ser
all the artists having chosen numb
which will be of special interest,i
only to music lovers, but to the p
ple in general.
The program will be as follows
Concert Rondo .............. Holl
Toccata .................Mere
Song of Happiness .........Lem
Earl V. Moore
(a) "The Plaidie".......A. H. Ry
(b) "Wind Song"..........Rog
(c) "Hail ye Tyme of Holiedayes
... Gena Branscom
Nore C. Hunt
Romance, E Minor ......... Sind:
Aria (on the G string) ......... .
Liebesfreud..............Kries
Marian Struble
Quaretes:
"Annie Laurie"........A .Gei
"Winter Song" ...... F. F. Bul
Kenneth N. Westerman, Firs
Tenor
Walter Scott Westerman, Sec-
ond Tenor.
U. Stanley Wilson, First Bass
Harry Carlson, Second Bass.
Variations on "Holy Night".....
... . . . . .. . . . . . . H ark(
La0date Dominum.........Sheld
Mr. Moore
accompaniments by Frances L. Ha
ilton and Nell B. Stockwell.
EEK TO SOLVE PROBLEM OF
STORAGE FOR MIXED PAINT
epartment of Chemical Engineerii
Experiments May Help
Big Industry
r
Manufacturers of paints have lo
xperienced difficulty in the storing
ixed paints, due to the deterioratio
the paint after having stood for,
ng time. Stocks of paint in ca
ave to be renewed from time to tim
ecause of the formation of a lay
etween the pigment and the vehicl
his leads to considerable loss.
In order to overcome this difficult
alph E. Christman, M. S., holder o
e Acme White Lead & Color Work
llowship, under the direction o
rof. E. E. Ware, of the chemical en
neering department, has beguna
ries of experiments which may lea
a solution of this problem.
Mixed paints will sometimes bod
to the consistency of putty and th
hicle apparently disappears. Thi
called puttying or livering. Conse
ently the paints cannot be kept fo
y' length of time, and this is a se
us expense to the manufacturers
vestigations have been carried o
)m time to time to solve the problem
t as yet no satisfactory solution has
en found.
f the university investigators are
le to reach a satisfactory result, it
1 be of immense practical import-
ce, as the paint and varnish indus-
according to the "Review of Re-
ws," is valued at $120,000,000.00,
ich is double that of structural
el, and consequently the highest
ned industry of any devoted to the
'duction of building materials.

uld Decrease Gridiron Toe Work
Vow that the 1915 season is over,
erts as well as those who never
any intention of being considered
thorities on the gridiron game are
ing over the idea of abolishing the
k after touchdown. Their chief idea
doing away with the extra point
hat Individual work alone adds the
nt, and in some cases-, decides the
test. Coaches of moleskin aggre-
aons go so far as to express them-
res in favor of abolishing the field
[s, but there is no reason for be-
ing that this will even be consid-
I by the rules committee.
[ways see The Ann Arbor Press
your printing if you want quality.
ss Bldg., Maynard street. Phone
,1. ( )

r on
tary
sday
iven
rsity
rbor,
tate
in-
hich
e.
ram
pro-
ries,
ers
not
peo-
3:
ins
aux
are
der
ers
nbe
ing
ach
ler
bel
ard
te
lee

1
T
I
F
S
l
i

I

CITY NEWS

on
.m-
TS
ing
ng
of
on
a
ns
ne
er
e.
;y,
of
ks
of
n-
a
d
y
e
is
)r
s.
n

Prof. Wgelow Starts Suit
Frank A. Stivers and William T.
Laird, attorneys for Prof. S. L. Bige-
low, yesterday began suit in the cir-
cuit court against the D., J. & C.
Railway company, for damages alleged
to have resulted to the professor's au-
tomobilekin an accident on November
n 28, 1914.
Professor Bigelow was driving his
machine on Washtenaw avenue on the
evening of that date, with his two dogs
in the tonneau. One of the animals
leaped out and he stopped his auto-
mobile on or near the car tracks to
allow the dog to .get back into the ma-
chine. At the same time a street car
approached and struck the car, caus-
ing considerable damage to it. The
complainant also states that when he
stopped the machine, he did not know
that it was in a dangerous position,,
owing to the darkness.
The defendant company contends
that the resulting damage was only-
slight; that the headlights on the ma-
chine and Professor Bigelow's famil-
iarity with the location of the tracks
in the vicinity should have served as
ample warning to him. It also is try-
ing to prove that he was violating a
city ordinance by the position of his
car at the time it was struck.
Considerable difficulty was experi-
enced in securing a jury yesterday
morning, but the case is now well
undereway and will probably go- to the:
jury early today.

After taking a year's rest from the
concert stage, the young violin genius,
Mischa Elman, is now playing thru-
gut the country to capacity houses
and will be heard in Hill Auditorium
next Monday evening, December 13.
It is a question whether any violin-
ist in the present generation has been
received with such wild enthusiasm
as this Russian wonder artist. Not
long ago in Detroit 500 seats had to
be placed on the stage to accomodate
the audience and on two occasions
when Elman played in Philadelphia,
the vast Academy of Music was com-
pletely sold out and extra seats had to
be arranged in the orchestra pits.
The Philadelphia Public Ledger of
(Continued on. Page Six)

MISGHA ELMAN TO
PRESENTVARIED
'PROGRAMMONDAgY
NOTED RUSSIA VIOLAN ST WILL
FILL SECOND PRE-FESTIVAL
E IIBER
GREETED BY SUCCESS ON TOUR

Selections Include Compositiolsi
Menidelssohin, Schubert
and Kreisler

by

.s
e
it
!;
.1
t
r ,

In the Justice Court
Ben Kirk, colored, was arraigned
yesterday before Justice John Thomas
on the charge of being intoxicated,.
and was fined $5.05, with the privilege
of serving 15 days in jail. Financial
shortage compelled him to choose the
jail sentence.
Frank Ray also imbibed too freely
in the glass that cheers, and was
brought before Judge Thomas. He
was fined $9.05 or 15 days in jail. He
chose the jail sentence.
Henry Murphy, colored, was arrest-
ed yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Ess-
linger, for using indecent language
and behaving boisterously on the pub-
lic streets. He came before Judge W.
G. Doty and 'was sentenckd to serve
30 days in jail.

white;
roared my triumph over the desert
wide,
hen stretched out, glad of the sands
and satisfied;

.-

Fresh Dents Will Meet This Morning
The fresh dents will hold a class
meeting at 9:00 o'clock this morning
in the fresh assembly room for the
purpose of electing a manager of the
basketball team.

sound- And through the long star-filled As-
The wild man-odor-thErouch, a syrian night,
bound, I felt your body breathing by my
And the frail Thing uivering side." -H. E. N.
with a cry!
Your yellow eyes bu)eautiful Dance and Banquet Programs- - O
with light: tractive Ones, at The Ann Arbor Press.
The dead man lay therted and (#)

(Continued from Column One) -
ment for the commodities clause of
the interstate commerce act, a regu-
lation of the laws pertaining to the
arrest and removal of persons indicted.
for crime, the appointment of addi-
tional judges when the incumbent is
over 70 years of age, a fixed salary
for the clerks in the United States dis-
trict courts, and amendment making
it a crime against the United States
to kill an officer by assaulting, beating.
or wounding him.

GIFT CARDS FURNISHED UrGGIFT CARDS FURN.SHED
STOFFLET'SNewsstand IIIMdgdLISubriptions RAII sd GitD 110 EAST WASHINGTON

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan