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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 02, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

........

rHE MICHIGAN DAILT.

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By Flashlight

Xmas.

Iombi

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iPs.

When you're out looking for your Winter
O ercoat, just pay this store a visit. We don't
ask you to favor us, but we do insist that you'll
regret slighting us.
There isn't a finer, smarter or complete
showing of O vereoats than ours in Town and
we'll show you prices that you can't beat any-
where.

You can get the inside pictures on

Music

dark days.

We have a little in-

struction book on flashlights that's
free. Ask for it.

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for f

$75

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CALKINS' PHARMACY
324 S. State Street

Wadhams & Co's Corner
MAIN STREET

"a "a ..r
-_ e..

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-=J

an "GOTHIC"
ARROW.
COLLAR
FRONT FITS CRAVAT KNOT
PERFECTLY. 2 for 2c
CLUETT. PEABODYA CO.. INC.. MAXtRS

Be
Attractively
Dressed
and gain the admiration of all
by having your next suit
Individually
Custom Tailored
by
ARTHUR F. MARQUARDT
Campus Tailor
516 East °W"iam St. Phone 1422-J
WILL DISTRIBUTE 10,000
BUTTONS FOR CAMPAIG
To Give Addresses in Public Schools
of State; Hastings Doctors
Continue Free Clinics

The

Undermuslin
Sale
now running is extraordinary
in qualities, fashions, reduc-
tions and is very comprehen-
sive.

The famous WolfMartin
and Ami-french brands
are Included complete.

(Second Floor)

V4I
MANY TRY OUT FOR PARTS
IN "THE BUSINESS )TEETING"
A large number tried out for parts
in "The Business Meeting," a play to
be given under the auspices of Mas-
ques on December 17, at a women's
League weekly party. It is to be re-
gretted that the play calls for only 10
people so efficient were those who
tried out. However, there will be
more plays presented later in the
year.
Following.are those who have parts
in the cast: Elaine Tappan, '19; Eva
Herzberg, Helen Richey, '17, Eva
Sharron, '17; Marjorie Stovell, '16;
Lois May, '18; Florence Paddock, '17;
Dorothy Gruss, '19, and Helen G. Dav-
is, '17.
Rehearsals will begin in the near
future under the direction of Mary
Palmer, '18M.
Jane Addams Suffers Breakdown
Chicago, Ill., Dec. 1.-Jane Addams
is seriousyl although not critically ill,
in the Presbyterian hospital, stricken
Monday night after an especially ac-
tive day. She was taken to the hos-
pital today. Until careful observation
can be made, the exact nature of Miss
Addams' illness cannot be determined,
so it is believed to be a sort of physi-
cal breakdown, caused by the strain
of uninterrupted work.

Lansing; Mich., Dec. 1.-As soon as
the order can be filled by the firm that
is in charge of the work, 10,000 neat
little buttons bearing the slogan of
the campaign that the state board of
health is making against tuberculosis
in Michigan, namely, "Health First,"
will be placed in the hands of the
state health workers for distribution
in the public schools.
The health campaign in each county
includes addresses to all the school
children, and as soon as the buttons
are ready for delivery, the pupils will
be given an opportunity to display
them on their coats and dresses. In
this way it is believed the good health
talks will make, more of an impression
on the children's minds and the pupils
will better remember the advice given
by the health workers.
Hastings, Mich., Dec. 1.-So much
were the doctors of Hastings impress-
ed with the free clinics that were held
here during the "Health First" cam-
paign conducted by the state board of
health that they have decided to hold
free clinics of their own once a week
from now on.
Each doctor in the city will give his
time free of charge during certain
hours of the week for this purpose and
during those hours persons suspecting
they may have tuberculosis can come
in to be examined without charge. The
finding of more than a hundred cases
of tuberculosis in Barry county has
prompted the doctors to take this step.
They believe the free clinics will do
much to help stamp out the diseases
by causing people to come in for ex-
amination when the disease is still in
its early stage.
First Year Laws to Hold Class Dinner
Plans have been completed by the
social committee of the first year law
class for a class dinner to be given
shortly before the holiday vacation.
Arrangements are also being made for
a dance, to be given the beginning of
next semester..

EDISON COMPANY IE
] FELLOWSH OF $00
Company Puts Work in Charge of
Prof. A. E. White, Who Performed
Other Experiments for Firm
Six hundred dollars have been given
to the chemical engineering depart-
ment of the University of Michigan by
the Edison Illuminating company of
Detroit to support a fellowship during
the present college year.
The Edison company maintains sev-
eral very large power plants which it
operates in accordance with the high-
est principles of scientific manage-
ment. In common with all other oper-
ators of power plants, it has occa-
sionally been subject to serious acci-
dents and delays on account of the
failure of boiler tubes in service.
The company now plans to make a
careful study of the proper specifica-
tions for boiler tubes and disseminate
the information gained for the general
public. Realizing the superior facili-
ties which the university affords, the
Edison company has asked the chem-
ical engineering department of the
university to make a careful exam-
ination of a number of tubes, some of
which have failed and some of which
have done excellent service. The metal
will be subjected to careful chemical
and microscopic examination to deter-
mine whether it has the proper chem-
ical composition and has been proper-
ly manipulated by the manufacturers.
Its properties will again be tested af-
ter a new heat treatment to determine
whether a different procedure in man-
ufacture might have improved it.
The work will be in charge of Prof.
Albert E. White, of the chemical en-
gineering department, who was suc-
cessful in a previous investigation for
the same company on brass condenser
tubes. At the time when Professor
White undertook this work on brass
condenser tubes, the failures at the
Edison company's plant averaged five
tubes a day for each condenser. New
specifications were recommended by
Professor White and as a result of
their enforcement there have not been
as many broken condenser tubes in a
year as there were in a day forrierly.
The fellwship will be held during
the coming year by Mr. Harold F.
Wood, of Manistee, Michigan. Mr.
Wood graduated from Ferris Insti-
tute in 1911 and from the University
of Michigan in February, 1915, with
the A. B. degree. He completed the
chemical engineering course at the
University of Michigan at the close of
the 1915 summer session, receiving the
degree of B. Ch. E. He had been ap-
pointed as a graduate assistant in
chemical engineering at the university
but resigned this to accept the new
fellowship.
There are now five fellowships in
the chemical engineering department1
supported by organizations which take
this broad-minded -and public-spirited'
attitude. The university on its part
is glad to cooperate in the solution ofE
such problems of general interest,1
provided that the results of the In-t
vestigation may be freely published
by it.

1,000 FARMERS TO
M1ET HERE SOON
Grange Association to Hold Annual
Convention in Ann Arbor
This Month
EVERY GRANGE SENDS TWO MEN
More than 1,000 farmers from all
over the state will attend the con-
vention of the state Grange Associa-
tion to be held here on the 14, 15, 16,
and 17 of this month.
Every grange inthe state of~Mich-
igan will send two delegates to the
convention. In addition to these there
will be a great number of people who
attend the grange meetings for edu-
cational purposes. The object of the
grange is to bring the farniers into
closer relationship, and to solve prob-
lems which trouble the agriculturist
The grange provides the only source
of entertainment that the farmer. re-
ceives. Throughout the long winter
months when travel is difficult and
communication practically impossible,
the grange meetings serve as the only
social gatherings in which the isolated
farmer can take part.
The grange is a secret organization,
and the meetings are not public. The
membership in this body is limited to
farmers. The convention meetings
will be held in Hill Auditorium. On
Wednesday evening there will be an
open meeting to which the public is
invited. A musical program, includ-
ing an organ recital, will be given at
this session. On Thursday evening the
visiting delegates will be tendered a
reception by the university authorities
in Alumni Memorial hall.

What Ekectricity Means
to You in Your Home

Electric Flat Irons
They save many steps in the kitchen

This Grafonola will play
all the latest Victor and
Columbia Records.
Come in and hear it.
Allmendinger's
Music Shop
122 E. Liberty Street

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]LUNCHES, CANDIES, HOT SUNDAES
AT THE

Electric Toasters
Make the inest toast for breakfast without any fuss or
trouble, and they are always ready.
Electric Heaters
Take the chill off the room, and do it quickly.
Why use a cold room when it can be easily avoided?
Electric Chafing Dishes
Are the very best things for the long winter evenings.
Think of the Welsh rarebits and other delicacies.
The Detroit Edison Company
Eastern Michigan Edison Division

SUGAR BOWL
109 SOUTH MAIN .STREET

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WE MAKE 0UR OWN CANDIES OUT OF
THE PUREST AND BEST MATERIALS
Conservation of Energy

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BALLOT SHOWS FACULTY
APPROVES OF TRAINING
Of 134 Votes Cast, 120 Believe That
Training Should be Com-
pulsory
Additional returns from the straw
ballot conducted by The Daily among
the faculty upon the question of mil-
itary training indicate that the faculty
is more unanimous upon the proposi-
tion than the student body, 134 votes
being cast for the training and 82
against in the 216 ballots received.
What the faculty gains in agree-
ment as to the desirability of training,
it loses in the variation of opinions as
to how the system should be applied.
Of the 134 who favored training, only
120 believe that it should be compul-
sory. In all, 84 votes were cast
against making the system compul-
sory, one member stating, "We want
nothing compulsory in America except
the exterpation of the hyphen."
In favor of voluntary drill, 31 votes
were registered; while 115 were
counted against the proposal. Many
stated that they would favor voluntary
training only if the compulsory sys-
tem should fail.

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CITY NEWS
Despondent, Kills Self.
Despondency over the loss of his
job as stenographer with.. a firm in
Chelsea, was the cause of the suicide
of Clarence J. Chapman, ag'ed 25, who
ended his life Tuesday evening, by
the gas route, at the home of 'his par-
ents, 318 E. Catherine St.
Young Chapman retired as usual in
the evening and although disheartened
over the loss of his job, he gave no
hint of his intentions. When he failed
to appear at the breakfast table yes-
terday morning, his mother instituted
a search for him with the result that
she found him in a front room of the
second story, lying on the floor uncon-
scious, with his head near an open
gas jet.
Physicians worked for hours in an
effort to revive the spark of life still
remaining, but their efforts were fu-
tile. As soon as it was ascertained
that the young man was dead, Cor-
oner Sam Burchfield was called who
pronounced death the result of a sui-
cidal intent.
Mrs. Chapman said her son had
carefully planned the suicide since he
had closed all the windows and doors
leading into the room. The room he
chose for the act was in a part of the
house little used-and where he stood
the 'least chance of being observed.
Issues Tax Receipts
City Treasurer George Sweet was
very busy all day yesterday, issuing
tax receipts. Since it was the first
day on which taxes could be paid, the
treasurer and his staff of assistants
did not expect to be very busy, but re-
ceipts aggregating a sum equal to a
week in last year's collections were
issued.
Rappold Brought to Trial
Emil Rappold, who attempted to
take his own life in the county jail,
Sunday night, was arraigned yester-
day afternoon before Justice of the

Peace Doty, on the charge of carrying
concealed weapons.
Itappold waived the preliminary ex-
amination, was bound over to the cir-
cuit court, and committed to the care
of the sheriff to await trial.
Tom's in Print Again
Tom Lovell, the poet and cobbler,
when he learned of the engagement of
President Wilson to Mrs. Norman Galt,
composed a poem together with a let-
ter of congratulation which he for-
warded to the executive offices.
Yesterday Mr. Lovell received a let-
ter from the secretary of, the presi-
dent which read as follows:
"Dr. Tom Lovell, Ann Arbor, Mich.,
"My Dear Sir:-The president has
asked me to thank you warmly for
your kind message of congratulation
which he heartily appreciates.
"Sincerely yours,
"J. P. TUMULTY,
"Secretary to the President."
Y. A. C. A. FILLS f
MANY QUEER POSITIONS
(Continued from Page Four.)
work.
As far as can be ascertained, only
three students have left school be-
cause of inability to get satisfactory
jobs. Secretary Lovejoy believes that
there are enough opportunities in Ann
Arbor to earn money and that no stu-
'dent should quit because of financial
difficulties.
Considering the growth of the
bureau during the last two years, the
eventual aim of the department would
seem to lean more and more toward
vocational guidance. Under this plan
a student will be able to obtain advice
and statistics about the different voca-
tions and find which one he is best
fitted for.
Buy your Mazda lamps at Switzer's,
310 South State. - oct23tt
Shirts made to order.-G. H. Wile
Company. State St. Tailors.

Prof. Bonner Lectures to Classical Club
Prof. Campbell Bonner, of the Greek
department, will deliver a lecture on,
"A Story About Stories," before the
Classical club ip Room A, Memorial
hall, at 7:15 o'clock tonight. The
public is cordially invited to this open
meeting.
2255 2255 2255 2255

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Two ballots declared that the uni-
versity should provide military train-
ing in summer camps and make this
training compulsory. A third favored
universal military service under the
auspices of the government. Several
expressed the belief that credit should
be given for drill work, and one mem-
ber voted for the Swiss system. AfterI
voting against training, one writer
adds, "The United States government
should do it and not spoil its univer-
sities."

Leave Copy Leave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
The Delta Supply Store
AD'VER 1 NO

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'ossibilitlecs of The "Ukulele
It can accompany the most difficult music written,
as well as the simpler gems.
To Any OCne Learning.
The pleasure derived from the Ukulele in a few
weeks' tuition far excels that of any other instrument.
WE ARE STATE AGENTS FOR THE GENUINE

Wi

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Three fine office rooms,
suitable for a doctor. @r dentist; all
piped and wired; guaranteed steam
heat. 1713-MOR, 1661-J. J. K. Mal-
colm. novl6tf

WANTED
WANTED-A name for the new Lunch
Room at 911 North University. The
student suggesting the most appro-
priate n'ame will receive a $2.00
Lunch Ticket free:-Jack Frost.

CRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE
116 S. Main St. COMPETENT INSTRUCTORS. UKULELES FROM $6.00 UP. Phone 1707

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